Search Results for Jo Freitag

Joys and Challenges of Twice-Exceptional Kids

JoysandChallengesTwiceExceptional

It is estimated that there are 300,000 twice exceptional children in the U.S. alone. (GCQ, Vol 55, #1, Winter 2011) Twice-exceptionality is the co-existence of both giftedness and a learning disability. It has been called a paradoxical syndrome. This week at #gtchat, we tackled the subject of 2ekids. It was soon realized that these kids are complex and have the ability to frustrate both their parents and teachers; but at the same time bring incredible joy into the lives of those around them.

Twice-exceptional children often face many social-emotional issues. Many struggle with self-awareness; knowing and understanding their own challenges. “They are often misunderstood and have expectations on them they can’t live up to.”(Mona Chicks) “The BIGGEST social-emotional challenge is finding true peers. Asynchrony makes it difficult to impossible. Worse in small towns. They have compassion like an adult, tantrums like a toddler, and wit like a snarky teenager. ” (Jen Merrill) “Two gifts, blessed with two gifts both of which need recognition & addressing in parallel, overlapping and together.” (Elaine Hook) “2ekids don’t ‘fit the mold’ for gifted, they challenge stereotypes and remind us that gifted doesn’t mean perfect.” (Andi McNair)

Labeling of children in an attempt to explain behaviors does little to address their need for specific accommodations. The gifted ‘label’ is too often misrepresented as meaning high-achiever; adult disappointment can emotionally harm twice-exceptional children. They can compensate for or mask their disability and do not get the help they need.

An exceptional resource was shared during the chat by Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources in Australia. Jo’s blog, Sprite’s Site, relates the experiences of Sprite, a fictional character, who happens to be twice-exceptional. Sprite’s disability is visually expressed by an ever present cast on one foot. Jo’s ability to make twice-exceptionality easy is to understand makes this a go to site for anyone wanting to know more about how these children feel and how to help them. She also writes a monthly newsletter which can be found here.

If you are interested in learning more about twice-exceptional children, please check out the full transcript of our chat and then the links provided below.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links from the chat:

“What is 2E?” from Twice-Exceptional Newsletter

“Twice-exceptional Students: Who Are They & What Do They Need?”

“Don’t Get Caught in the Lazy Trap”

“Twice-Exceptional Me” from the National Center for Learning Disabilities

Myths & Misconceptions About ADHD: Science over Cynicism

Giftedness & Learning Disabilities

Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism (Amazon)

Cybraryman’s Twice-Exceptional Children Page

The Misdiagnosis of Gifted Children (YouTube)

 

Additional Links:

Double Inequity, Redoubled Critique: Twice-Exceptional (Gifted + Learning Disabled) Students

Gifted and Learning Disabled A Handbook (pdf)

The Paradox of Twice-Exceptionality Packet of Information for Professionals (pdf)

The Twice-Exceptional Dilemma (pdf)

Supporting the Identification and  Achievement of the Twice-Exceptional Student (pdf)

Gifted Children with Learning Disabilities by Linda Silverman  in N. Colangelo, & G. A. Davis (Eds.) The Handbook of Gifted Education, Third Edition (pp. 533-543). Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2003 (pdf)

Twice-Exceptional Students Gifted Students with Disabilities Level 1: An Introductory Resource Book (pdf)

Special Populations: Giftedness and ADHD from Duke TIP

Identifying Twice-Exceptional Children and Three Gifted Styles in the Japanese Primary Science Classroom (pdf)

The Paradox of Giftedness and Autism (pdf)

The Paradox of Twice-Exceptional Children: Perceptions of Disabilities, Giftedness and Underachievement 

Creating a Toolkit for Identifying Twice-Exceptional Students (pdf)

Inclusion for Students with Twice Exceptionality Paradox and Possibility (pdf)

A Unique Challenge: Sorting Out the Differences Between Giftedness and Asperger’s Disorder (pdf)

Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

De Bono’s Action Plans with Special Guest Jo Frietag

Jo Freitag

This week’s special guest was Mrs. Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources in Australia and author of Sprite’s Site (blog). We discussed the use of De Bono’s Six Action Shoes Program as applied to gifted programs and in particular to Twice-Exceptional children. A full transcript of the chat may be found here.

Sprite2eQuest

Links:

Gifted Programs Planned Using De Bono’s 6 Action Shoes as a Planning Tool

Sprite’s Blue Formal Shoes

Sprite’s Grey Sneakers 

Sprite’s Brown Brogues 

Sprite’s Orange Gumboots 

Sprite’s Pink Slippers 

Sprite’s Purple Riding Boots 

Building Gifts into Talents: Overview of the DMGT (pdf) 

Sprite’s More Shoes

Sprite’s Plaster Cast

Sprite’s One Size Shoe Cover System

Gifted Resources Blog

Gifted & Creative Services Australia

Hoagies’ Gifted Education Page

Feetspeak: 2E Shoes Project 

The Psych-Owl-Ogist

Nest Ed

Dabrowski Dogs

Black Dogs

Memory Elephant

Columbus Cheetah Myth Buster

columbuscheetah

De Bono Six Action Shoes

Cybraryman’s Socratic Seminar Page

How Does Full Inclusion Affect Gifted Students?

gtchat-02072017-inclusion

Full inclusion places all ability levels in one classroom. It expects a teacher to be responsible for all children; regardless of ability or behaviors. Todd Kettler, assistant professor at UNT, explained, “Full inclusion makes big assumptions about curriculum and instruction in order to be effective for all learners. I’m not a fan of full inclusion. I recommend flexible grouping based on ability and interest with a modified curriculum. Well designed curriculum, trained and qualified teachers, and grouping will lead to the highest achievement for GT students.”

Full inclusion is very popular in education generally today. It is a real boon for strained budgets. Many administrators believe inclusion is the only appropriate approach to equity in education for all students.

How does inclusion impact gifted kids? Do other students really see them as role models? Far too often, gifted kids are relegated to the back of the room reading while other students learn material new to them. Rather than being role models, gifted students become the subject of ridicule or bullying. It can create lasting scars. Dr. Gail Post expressed that inclusion’s impact on gifted kids is “rarely positive – they have to fit in, dumb down, wait for others to catch up, and manage boredom. [It’s a] huge myth that at-risk kids will see them as role models – if anything, the situation will evoke envy and possible bullying.”

Professional development for teachers may sometimes compensate for classroom attitudes toward gifted students. It can go a long way is shaping attitudes; but more may be needed to change preconceived notions about gifted students. The core of education should always be to create empathy for one’s subject matter; with learning comes understanding. Jonathan Bolding, a MS G/T educator and 2015-16 NAGC Javits-Frasier Scholar in TN, pointed out, “PD for teachers is only part of the equation. Follow-up on fidelity of implementation, leadership support, and whole school buy-in” are also necessary.

Does removing gifted students from a classroom negatively impact the rest of the class? More often, the removal of gifted students from a classroom may have a positive effect. Removing them can allow teachers more time to work with other students who need their assistance.

Can differentiation of the curriculum really meet the academic needs of gifted students? It is dependent on the quality of professional development provided to classroom teachers. Differentiation may meet the needs of some students, but rarely the needs of highly-abled students. Jo Freitag, coordinator of Gifted Resources and author at Sprite’s Site in Australia, told us, “Differentiation is only effective if each student receives their required level of depth and pace; however extreme.” A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

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Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 14.00 NZST/12.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Educating Gifted Ss in Regular Classroom: Efficacy, Attitudes & Differentiation of Instruction (pdf)

Gifted Students and Inclusion

Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom (pdf)

Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom (Amazon)

Toward More Research on Effective Practices w/Gifted Students in Gen-Ed Settings (pdf)

Highly Gifted Children in Full Inclusion Classrooms

Maximizing Gifted Students’ Potential In The 21st Century

Gifted Programs: Is Inclusion the Answer?

Six Strategies for Challenging Gifted Learners

Differentiation in Key Learning Areas for Gifted Students in Regular Classes (pdf)

The Gifted Child and the Inclusive Classroom (pdf)

What the Research Says about Gifted Learners

Cybraryman’s Inclusion Page

Sprite’s Site: De Bono’s 6 Action Shoes 9: One Size Shoe Cover System

Photo courtesy of Pixabay    CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Existential Depression in Gifted Individuals

gtchat-11222016-existential-depression

Existential depression is a depression that arises when an individual confronts certain basic issues of existence.(Webb) Classic symptoms of existential depression include isolation, alienation, meaninglessness and lack of focus and direction.

At this week’s chat, we were excited to welcome Dr. James T. Webb to Twitter as well as our chat. Dr. Webb has written extensively about existential depression. His contributions were greatly appreciated. His book, Searching for Meaning is listed below.

“Psychologists and philosophers have known about existential depression for centuries. Only recently have folks tied it in with gifted. That makes sense, though. You have to be bright in order to realize the absurdities of societies.”                                                                      ~ Dr. James T. Webb

Existential depression can be caused by personal, environment & professional mismatches that is accompanied by a sense of hopelessness. For gifted young adults, an inability to find inspiring mentors & coaches to identify with can lead to existential depression.

“Existential depression may be caused by a traumatic event OR simply by awakening to our seemingly arbitrary existence. It’s important to know that existential depression can occur in very young gifted children as well as individuals of all ages.”     ~ Dr. Marianne Kuzujanakis

Gifted individuals are more prone to existential depression because it requires substantial thought and reflection to occur. (Webb) A predisposition to existential questioning from an early age, increases the potential for existential depression in gifted adults. They can seek out their ‘tribe’; look for those who share their need for deep thinking. We were reminded by Dr. Webb that “existential depression can spur you to change in great ways – disintegration that can become positive. It is why we need to be close, kind, and caring toward each other. Shared idealism gives us purpose, I think.” Indeed … why humanity chooses to go on in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds.

How can parents help their children cope with existential depression? Parents need to understand that their child’s feelings are real and not to be minimized. They should help them know that they are not alone and there are ways to manage feelings. Dr James Webb suggests the importance of ‘touch’ for children grappling with existential concerns … daily hugs! Children experiencing existential depression should be encouraged to utilize bibliotherapy to learn how others have coped.

“Parents can provide their children a safe place to express their concerns, fears and emotions. Encourage their abilities and interests. Help them find peers.”                                                                                           ~ Jo Freitag, Gifted Resources

There are several things teachers can do if they suspect a child may be experiencing existential depression. As with parents, teachers should not ignore the signs of existential depression or try to minimize child’s feelings. When dealing with students with existential depression, guidance counselors & support staff should be utilized.

We highly recommend viewing the transcript of this week’s chat for a more extensive review of the topic which may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 14.00 NZST/12.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Searching for Meaning Idealism, Bright Minds, Disillusionment & Hope (Amazon)

searching-for-meaning-cover

 

 

 

 

When Bright Kids Become Disillusioned

The Gifted Kids’ Survival Guide: For Ages 10 & Under (Amazon)

Existential Depression in Gifted Individuals 

Gifted, Sensitive, In Need Of Meaning: Existential Depression

Of Giftedness, ADD, Depression & Being an HSP 

Existential Crisis (Wikipedia)

Rethinking Depression: How to Shed Mental Health Labels & Create Personal Meaning (Amazon)

The Experience of Emptiness (Amazon)

Existential Depression: The Disease of the Gifted & Talented 

2008 Dabrowski Congress Proceedings (pdf)

Exploring the Duality of the Gifted Teen 

Gifted Adults & Relationships: Ten Sources of Conflict 

Your Rainforest Mind: A Guide to the Well-Being of Gifted Adults & Youth 

your-rainforest-mind-front-cover

The Problem of Pain

Dabrowski’s Theory & Existential Depression in Gifted Children & Adults

Existential Psychotherapy (Amazon)

Cybraryman’s Mental and Emotional Health Page 

What Do We Know about Suicide? Not Nearly Enough 

Right Here With You 

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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