Monthly Archives: October 2015

The Relationship between Creativity and Intelligence

gtchat 10232015 Creativity Intelligence

This week’s topic, The Relationship between Creativity and Intelligence was a bit ‘deeper’ than usual. It became quickly apparent that there were many divergent opinions on the subject. It proved to be an interesting conversation. We welcomed many new people to the chat as well!

In order to consider this relationship, we first defined what intelligence and creativity meant to our participants. According to Gautam, intelligence is a domain-general ability to solve complex adaptive problems. In its pure form, intelligence is complex and multidimensional. Defining intelligence has gotten a lot of press in recent years; many new ideas!

Creativity is the ability to come up with original, surprising and useful ideas. (Gautam) Tamara Fisher, education specialist, described it as, “the capacity to generate and innovate in new ways, whether by sudden instinct or through long, hard work.” Creativity emerged as an adaptive cognitive mechanism; improvisational reasoning could lead to novel solutions. (Jung) Christensen defined creativity as the “ability to go beyond intelligence an capitalize on seemingly random connections of concepts.”

Currently, there is no scientific consensus on how these constructs [creativity and intelligence] are related. Some believe intelligence may increase creative potential up to a certain degree. (Jauk, Benedek, Dunst, Neubauer 2013) Some say they are opposite ends of a spectrum; other the same thing.

What are some things that characterize highly creative people? Highly creative people are passionate, sensitive, imaginative, intuitive, and often solitary. They are open to experience, mindful, think differently, daydreamers, turn adversity into advantage. 

We then discussed why it is important to understand the creative process as it affects gifted kids & adults. The more we know about neuroscience and creativity, the better we can meet the needs of gifted children. Using outdated information can diminish best practices for empowering gifted kids to fulfill their potential. Understanding how the brain works and networks will benefit all gifted and twice-exceptional children. A transcript may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays Noon NZDT/10 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

The Relationship between Creativity and Intelligence

The Relationship between Intelligence & Creativity: New Support for the Threshold Hypothesis

Intelligence and Creativity of Polish Middle-school Students: Looking for the Threshold Hypothesis (pdf)

Genius, Creativity and Breakthrough Innovations

Interview with Dean Keith Simonton on Intelligence and Creativity

The Study of Effects of Socio Demographic Factors of Senior Secondary School Students on Creativity and Intelligence

Creativity & Intelligence Leading to Psychosis and Autism (Sandeep Gautam)

Creativity and Intelligence: a Tripartite Structure? (Sandeep Gautam)

The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence (Amazon)

From Madness to Genius: The Openness/Intellect Trait Domain as a Paradoxical Simplex (abstract)

Intelligence, Creativity and Mania

Evolution, Creativity, Intelligence, and Madness: “Here Be Dragons”

Must One Risk Madness to Achieve Genius?

Wired to Create Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind (December 2015)

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity

Neuroscience of Creativity (Amazon)

Another Look at Creativity and Intelligence: Exploring Higher-Order Models and Probable Confounds

Intelligence and Creativity

 

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad. Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain 

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Gifted Advocacy: What’s the Point?

gtchat 10162015 Gifted Advocacy

Longtime #gtchat contributor Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources in Australia led off this week’s chat by explaining, “Whenever anyone speaks up to increase awareness or explain issues, they are acting as an advocate.Parent groups can advocate by increasing information and awareness by guest speaker sessions and seminars.” Leslie Graves, President of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children added, “Parents, educators and those in related professions [such as] health, mental health and extended family as well as legislators, too, [can act as advocates].” Angie French, GT teacher in Texas reminded us, “Remember, GT kids can advocate for each other too. As adults, we need to equip them with info and skills.” Jonathan Bolding, GT middle school teacher in Tennessee, explained advocacy strategies, “Parents can write op eds; groups can organize and meet with their local Policymakers; attend board meetings.” Amber Styles, Communications and Scholarship Recruitment Coordinator at the Jack Kemp Cooke Foundation, continued by saying, “Parents know their children best, but teachers and education leaders are important partners in advocacy.” Indeed, our entire chat focused on those who advocate and why they do so for gifted children.

We next considered why gifted students need special education and the responsibilities schools have for educating ALL students. The general consensus was that all students have a right to learn something new everyday; AYP [Annual Yearly Progress] applies to every student. Mary Chancellor, teacher in Texas, pointed out, “Gifted students often are reluctant to speak up in heterogeneous classrooms since classmates don’t always “get” what they’re saying.They may think of their GT classrooms as their safe place.”

How do we get beyond charges of elitism when advocating for gifted education? Sports metaphors are applicable; benefits accorded top athletes should be granted to our top scholars as well. Celi Trépanier, author and former public school teacher, told us, “We need to keep putting information about gifted children out into the public and keep advocating–never give up.”

Next we turned our attention to what should be the primary focus of gifted advocacy to better serve gifted children. Advocates need to seek out ‘best fit’ between gifted students and available programs or proposed programs. Tracy Fisher, TAGT Board of Directors member, believes, “focus should be on the importance of EVERY child having a MINIMUM of a year of growth in a year.”

Finally, we considered strategies for advocating for gifted education; effectively getting the message out. Remaining calm and professional while negotiating with school personnel is paramount to effective advocacy. Karen Mensing, elementary teacher in Arizona, suggested, “People sometimes seem to understand how essential gifted services are when it’s compared to special education.” Tracy Fisher said of her school district in Coppell, Texas, “WE STARTED A “tier services” structure two years ago. Now, every GT Learner (beginning in elementary) will have an IEP.” The moderator added, “Self-advocacy on the part of older gifted students often results in beneficial outcomes and parents should learn the language of educators; talk the talk! ” Carol Bainbridge, Gifted Kids Guide at About.com, said, “My parent group used to put on talks by experts, open to the public; went to the county fair; and left brochures at libraries.” Mary Phillips, teacher in Michigan, suggested, “Frame the conversation around who might best benefit from gifted/talented offerings, not who “deserves” it most.”

“Final thoughts: I hope we are never too discouraged or feel advocacy is hopeless. We have a mountain to move, but we can together.” ~ Celi Trépanier

A transcript of the chat may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays Noon NZDT/10 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

The Wrong Argument for Gifted Education

RED ALERT: Gifted Education is a Civil Rights Issue

Parent Support & Advocacy: What Works!

Answering The Classic Criticism of “Are Gifted Programs “Elitist”?”

10 Phrases to Defuse Tensions at IEP (&GIEP) Meetings

Preaching to the Choir: Thinking about Gifted Advocacy

Why Gifted Students Still Need Gifted Education!

Needed: Parent Advocacy

Social Networking – Impacting the World of Gifted Education

Sprite’s Site De Bono’s 6 Action Shoes 9: One Size Shoe Cover System

Innreach’s Blog: Advocacy & 21st Globalness

Gifted Advocacy: What Not to Do

Raise Your Voice for Gifted Kids

GT Carpe Diem (pdf)

Educational Advocacy for Gifted Students 

How to Support Your Exceptionally Able Child at Home and at School (Slideshare)

Care & Feeding of Gifted Parent Groups: Guide for Gifted Coordinators, Teachers & Parent Advocates (pdf)

Empowering Gifted Minds: Educational Advocacy That Works (Amazon)

The Blame Game! Are School Problems the Kids’ Fault?

How Schools Can Offset the “Asian Advantage” for Other Kids, Too

NAGC’s Advocacy Toolkit

The Problem with “Formative Assessment Tools” (part 2 of 2)

International Gifted Advocacy Organizations and Best Practice

Leslie Graves’ Livebinder “Gifted Advocacy”

Advocate for High-Ability Learners

Hoagies Gifted: Gifted Advocacy

Cybraryman’s Gifted Advocacy Page

Increasing Identification of Gifted Learners from Diverse Backgrounds

PEGY Profoundly and Exceptionally Gifted Youth: Advocacy

Closing the Excellence Gap

Hold on – Javits Works

Sprite’s Site: Asking for Help – A Guest Expert Panel Q&A Session

Sprite’s Site: Advocacy – Just ask Sprite and Company

Inside the Mind of Gifted Middle School Students

Advocating for Gifted Programs in Your Local Schools

Advocate for Your Child

 

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Writing Your Own Script: A Parent’s Role in the Gifted Child’s Development

gtchat 10092015 Writing Your Own Script

 

This week, #gtchat welcomed Corin Barsily Goodwin, Executive Director of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, and Mika Gustavson, MFT; authors of “Writing Your Own Script: A Parent’s Role in the Gifted Child’s Development”, the latest book in the GHF Press Perspectives In Gifted Homeschooling Series. It marks a departure from their previous focus of finding the right academic fit for a child in their first book Making the Choice: When Typical School Doesn’t Fit Your Atypical Child to guiding parents on how to facilitate the development of friendships for gifted and twice-exceptional children.

Making the Choice GHF

We began our discussion by considering why  gifted and twice-exceptional children struggle to find others with the same interests and how levels of friendship play a role. So often, age-peers do not share interests  with these kids due to asynchronous development and the less cited fact that true peers are scarce. Dave Mayer pointed out, “Many seek the same level of intensity regarding a concept or activity, not just mild interest or friendly amiability.” Thus, the gifted child will not relate well to others as well. The authors referenced the work of Miraca Gross in “Play Partner” or “Sure Shelter”: What Gifted Children Look for in Friendship.

There are times when some parents have difficulty separating their own needs from those of their children. They must be honest with themselves; it’s not the child’s role to fulfill the aspirations of their parents. There are also parents who are gifted, but were never identified. Their dissatisfaction with the school system may stem from personal frustration and unmet needs as a child. Sometimes a simple open and honest dialog with your child can solve the problem.

Overexcitabilites and asynchronous development both play roles in the development of friendships. Mika told us, “One child may be on different levels emotionally, behaviorally, intellectually.” Corin added, “Not every child has the capacity to deal with meltdowns, intensities or other behavioral issues. Kids may also have conflicting needs – such as one who thrives on sensory input and another who is sensory sensitive.”

gtchat 10092015 Writing Your Own Script Graphic

So, what role should parent’s play in their gifted/2E kids’ friendships? Each child is unique with different needs that must be reflected in the parent’s participation in their lives. Many factors must be taken into consideration as Corin stated, “Factors including age, development, tired or not tired, sensory input, one-on-one or groups, hungry, etc. Don’t expect consistency.” Parents may need to act as facilitators by providing opportunities for intellectual peers to meet.  Jaime of Online G3 said, “Parents can model healthy relationships, with together time, alone time, and finding ways to connect on various levels.” As a child grows, these needs change and as Jen Merrill told us, “Eventually you have to back off; I’m kinda there now. Set up events and get outta the way.”

“Not every child has the capacity to deal with meltdowns, intensities or other behavioral issues. Kids may also have conflicting needs – such as one who thrives on sensory input and another who is sensory sensitive.” ~ Corin Barsily Goodwin

How can parents be sure they are encouraging independence in their child by the actions they take? It’s important to look for social growth in your child’s behavior. Mika said, “Remember this is about scaffolding – giving your child a hand up and the tools to become independent.” According to Corin, “Scaffolding is an investment in their future independence, really. Some folks believe that kids develop in lockstep, but that’s not true. Some develop evenly; many don’t. And that’s OK.” Care M. summed it up, “I think it’s a lot like being at the playground. Grit teeth, hope for best, be there to pick up the pieces if they fall off.” A transcript may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays Noon NZDT/10 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Defining Giftedness

Gifted Resources

Resources: Twice-Exceptional (2E)

Twice-Exceptional Issues

Parent Resources

4 Ways Executive Functioning Issues Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life

Friendship Patterns in Highly Gifted Children

Teaching Social Skills to Young Gifted Children: Why & How

A 5 Is Against the Law! Social Boundaries: Straight Up! (Amazon)

A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (Amazon)

Asperger Syndrome & Difficult Moments: Practical Solutions for Tantrums, Rage & Meltdowns (Amazon)

Gifted, Bullied, Resilient: A Brief Guide for Smart Families (Amazon)

Keys to Successfully Parenting the Gifted Child (Talent Igniter)

Leslie Graves’ Livebinder Gifted and 2E

Cybraryman’s Mental and Emotional Health

Dabrowski’s Over-excitabilities A Layman’s Explanation  (Tolan)

Sprite’s Site: Stories of the OEs

Sprite’s Site: Making Connections 2

 

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Grade Levels: Is It Time to Consider Alternatives?

gtchat 10022015 Grade Levels

 

The first question under consideration at this week’s gtchat concerned why we group children by age in schools. The current system of education was developed in response to economic circumstances of the Industrial Revolution. However, as early as 1912 Frederick Burk warned, “The class system does injury to the rapid and quick-thinking pupils, because these must shackle their stride to keep pace with the mythical average.”

Celi Trépanier, author at Crushing Tall Poppies, noted, “Every child development milestone since birth is based on age. It was probably a logical choice at the time it was made.” Jaime, founder of Online G3 told us, “Age groupings allow for ease of processing in the factory model of education.” Several participants made the important distinction between peers and age-mates. One does not necessarily equal the other; especially for gifted children. Katie McClarty, Director of the Center for College & Career Success at Pearson Research and Innovation Network summed it up, “It can be difficult to find true peers for GT learners because of the asynchrony.”

“Students are educated in batches, according to age, as if the most important thing they have in common is their date of manufacture.” ~ Sir Ken Robinson, TED Talk

Is grouping by age the best way to foster growth and learning? Growth and learning come with challenge and exploration of passions; neither of which are contingent on age. Andrea of GiftedandTalented.com said, “Students should be immersed in an environment that allows them to dig into their curiosity when they feel an interest for that subject.” Jo Freitag, Coordinator of Gifted Resources  and Sprite’s Site in Australia added, “No, keeping age peers together is not the best way to foster learning – much better cooperative learning happens with true peers.” In fact, it was pointed out that rarely do we categorize people by age in any other setting.

Although there was widespread agreement that age-grouping does not serve school children well, is it plausible to consider eliminating age-grouping in public schools? Many considered it not only plausible, but necessary. It would be a monumental task to say the least; logistically, economically, and realistically ~ a whole new mind-set.

Negative consequences of changing the current system were then addressed. Societal norms steeped in tradition would come into conflict with changing the current system; i.e., accommodating sports. Non-academic activities (such as proms) supported by modern-day schools would not want drastic changes. Things to consider would be how to initially place students (what assessments to use) and the fluidity of groupings, what to name the new groupings, implementation of a new system, and the financial impact to school districts (teacher training, logistics).

gtchat 10022015 Grade Levels Graphic

What benefits might accrue for gifted children by eliminating age-grouping in schools? Eliminating age-grouping could allow children to progress at their own rate. Too many gifted children sit in classes without opportunity for growth; become disillusioned with the system. Progress could be measured by ability and mastery. There most likely would be fewer social-emotional issues and underachievement reduced. Being with academic peers would feel equalizing for many; at all strength and ability levels. Editor and writer Jeremy Bond astutely observed, “They don’t have to be labeled “gifted” if they don’t want to be. Nobody’s on the same level.”

Finally we looked at what alternatives to age-grouping should be explored. Competency-based education is one alternative to age-grouping; the student moves on after a demonstrative assessment. Mentorships, job shadowing, experiential learning are all possible alternatives to age-grouping. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 11 AM NZST/9 AM AEST to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Why Dividing Us by Age in School Doesn’t Make Sense

TED Talk: Changing Education Paradigms

Silberman’s “Crisis in the Classroom, Remaking of American Education”: A Critical Analysis (pdf)

Elon Musk Running Exclusive Ad Astra School in California Mansion Just to Educate his Children 

Grouping Kids by Age Should Have Vanished with the Little Red Schoolhouse

Is Multi-Age Grouping Beneficial to Middle School Students? (1999)

Group Kids by Ability and Subject Not Age Says Gifted Education Professor

Younger Children in the Classroom Likely Over-diagnosed with ADHD

AUS: The Effectiveness of Multi-age Grouping (pdf)

Stereotype Threat

The Effects of Grouping Children According to Their Ability in Primary Schools

Tech Will Make Us Rethink Age-grouping in Schools

Multi-age Grouping (1987)

Grade Levels Could be a Thing of the Past in Schools Focused on Competency

Competency Education Series: Policy Brief One (pdf)

What are the Benefits of Mixed-Age Classrooms?

AUS: Stages … Not Ages (pdf)

NYC: Wired Olympus Students Race toward Diploma at their Own Pace

A Second Chance at Reinventing the High School Experience

Grouping from the NAGC

The Problem with “Formative Assessment Tools”

Sprite’s Site: Socialization 2

Position Paper on Grouping from the NAGC

 

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Image courtesy of Pixabay.  CC0 Public Domain

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