Monthly Archives: January 2018

Gifted Education on a Budget

gtchat 01112018 Budget

In the current state of educational funding, gifted programs are often the first to be cut or at least curtailed. With that in mind, this week’s chat considered ways to continue programs using creative sources of funding. It was reasoned that if schools were providing funds for other programs such as special education and sports, gifted education should be supported as well.

In the U.S., gifted education does not benefit from a national policy that includes funding but must rely on state governments to mandate and or fund programs for gifted students. Few states both mandate and fund programs while others designate unfunded mandates placing funding decisions on local school districts.

Chat participants were asked if  gifted students should  have to pay for extra activities such as academic competitions, field trips, etc. It was believed that when activities are substituted – designated – for gifted programming; ie, using Odyssey of the Mind as their gifted program (a regular in-school class); gifted students absolutely should not have to pay for these activities. When activities provided to all students in a school by an outside organization such as the PTA funding field trips, gifted students should not be required to pay for these activities.

The role of gifted organizations in influencing state budgets was then discussed. Their role is often caught in a ‘catch 22’ situation. States that fund gifted education have stronger state gifted organizations which in turn can have greater influence over state budgets. Most state organizations serve as advocates for funding. Larger organizations may have paid liaisons who work with state officials to secure funding.

What programming strategies are most cost-effective in gifted education? By far, acceleration leads in providing appropriate challenge and enrichment for the least cost to school districts. Early in and  early out strategies which are types of acceleration are extremely cost-efficient.

Technology use can certainly help gifted education budgets, but tech cannot replace gifted programming as the sole source of education for gifted students. Even with gifted students, good tech is enhanced with qualified facilitators.  Technology can fill both a personnel need and provide cost-effective measures in rural school districts that may not be able to afford highly-qualified educators for smaller populations of gifted students. Moreover, it can help gifted students to connect and collaborate with intellectual-peers in far-ranging geographical locations.

There are economic benefits to schools if they address the needs of gifted students. It was pointed out to the moderator years ago by a school board member that the less time a student spends in school (K-12) the more the district saves in educating that individual. Empowering students to achieve academic and personal goals will reap economic benefits to the local community when they become productive contributors and taxpayers to the local region. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2 PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Massachusetts’ State Gifted Board Member Speaks before Governor’s Budget Committee

Cluster Grouping of Gifted Students: How to Provide Full-Time Services on a Part-Time Budget

Possible Economic Benefits of Full-grade Acceleration https://goo.gl/Aad4y9

AUS: Meeting the Needs of Gifted Students through the Use of Subject Acceleration (pdf)

Gifted and Talented Education: A Review of Relevant Literature (pdf)

Committee for Education Funding: Analysis of Education Budget Fiscal Year 2018

NZ: Restored Funding and Hope for Gifted Education

Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program Funding Status

Kentucky Department of Education Gifted and Talented Coordinator Manual 2017 – 2018 (pdf)

TAGT: From a Nation Deceived to a Nation Empowered A Never-Ending Story (pdf – p. 6)

The Forgotten Rural Gifted Child

Rural Gifted Education and the Effect of Proximity (Abstract only)

What to Look for in a Good Gifted Program

Cybraryman’s Free or Inexpensive Supplies/Equipment for Your Classroom

Photo courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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When Gifted Students Own Their Learning

gtchat 01042018 Own Learning

Student ownership of learning is when a student becomes invested in his own learning; the realization that learning is of personal value to oneself. A student’s active involvement in their own education resulting from a desire to learn connotes student ownership of learning. At the beginning of the new year, #gtchat began the discussion of what it looks like for gifted students to own their learning.

Gifted students may or may not be motivated to take ownership of their own learning contrary to popular belief. If their strengths are not academic, they may have little interest in school. Motivation to take ownership of their learning may require educators to allow #stuvoice and choice; Socratic instruction; self-reflection; less dependence on planned lessons; less testing, more requests for feedback.

One of the best examples of students owning their learning can be found in Project-based Learning – learning proposed, directed and executed by the student. A personalized approach to PBL is especially appealing to gifted students. Another example of student owned learning is the creation of digital portfolios which can showcase their work. Portfolios may take the form of blogs, videos, or displaying art/music projects. Students can take ownership of their learning by building presentation skills either something as simple as PP to participating in a performance-based environment such as a recital.

How does technology impact student ownership of learning? Technology must enhance authentic learning; not just replication of learning. Gifted students may find building a computer or robot much more valuable than simply sitting and staring at a computer screen. It can play a vital role in the ownership of learning when used as a problem-solving tool rather than ‘the’ answer. Objectives and goals need to be personalized via technology. It enhances how students collect and share information. Technology can provide a sense of community with like-minded, intellectual peers who can work together; an oft-missed opportunity for gifted students in the past.

Virtually all work does not become valuable until it is presented/showcased. Students need to learn how to best present their ideas and projects in a meaningful way. This is a precursor for professional success in life as an adult. By learning presentation skills, it takes their learning to another level – kicks it up a notch! It also hopefully provides an authentic audience for their work. This in turn amplifies their motivation factor.

Changes need to be made to curriculum and instruction to ensure students have the skills to succeed. Instruction needs to evolve into facilitation. Meaningful learning and ownership of that learning will be enhanced by teacher led deep-level, thought provoking questioning and then thoughtful listening to provide feedback. Students should be provided with an environment that encourages imagination, student choice, freedom and time to explore interests, and finally a way to showcase their learning. A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

As we enter the 7th year of #gtchat, we would like to acknowledge those people behind the scene who make it all possible!

Thank you to the TAGT staff ~

Budget TAGT Staff

And to our Advisory Board ~

Own Learning Advisory Board

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2 PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Can Students Learn Entirely on their Own?

New Experiments in Self-Teaching (TEDTalks 17:25)

School in the Cloud

The 5 Core Components of K-12 Entrepreneurship Education

World Peace Game Foundation

The Digital Transformation of Learning: Social, Informal, Self-Service, and Enjoyable

What Is Self-Directed Education?

10 Ways to Motivate Students to Take Responsibility for Their Learning

50 Ways to Empower Students in a Connected World

Getting Students to Take Responsibility for Learning

Creating Pupils Who take Responsibility for their Own Learning

5 Ways to Increase Student Ownership in Your Classroom

When Students Drive Learning, They Can Do So Much More

Cybraryman’s Student-Centered Classrooms Page

Self-Directed Learning: Documentation and Life Stories (GHF Press)

What Makes an ‘Extreme Learner’?

Cybraryman’s Presentation Tools Page

Cybraryman’s Games in Education Page

Genius Hour: Passion Projects that Ignite Innovation and Student Inquiry (Amazon)

Meet the #SinglePointRubric

New Tech Network’s Revised Oral Communication and Collaboration Rubrics

Ginger Lewman’s LifePractice PBL

Genius Hour/20% Time Livebinder

Resonate: Present Visual Stories that Transform Audiences (Amazon)

Stop Telling your Kids that School Will Prepare them for Life

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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