Category Archives: Gifted Organizations

Books, Blogs & Documentaries for GT Parents & Teachers

gtchat 05312018 Books

There are many ways to find online for resources regarding gifted children, parenting, and the education of GT students. Google Alerts can be set to learn about the latest news in gifted children, gifted education and gifted & talented. Of course, you can check out @gtchatmod Twitter lists! Also, state and national gifted organization websites have great resources. Don’t rely solely on your own state’s sites; check around (TX, CA, OH, MN, CT).

Organizations for the gifted have resources for parents and teachers of GT students. On Twitter, a few include @NAGCGIFTED, @SENG_Gifted, @GiftedHF, @PPUK_,  and @wcgtc; as well as @IEAgifted @SIGifted @belinblank @CECTAG and @Hoagies Gifted.  Mainstream education websites also provide resources for gifted and talented; such as, @edutopia @ASCD, and @iste.

You can check out our transcript at Wakelet to see favorite books, blogs and documentaries of chat participants. We’ve included links below to additional sites.

Disclaimer: Inclusion in the links below is for informational purposes only and does not imply a recommendation by Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Publishers:

Publishers Specializing in the Gifted

Prufrock Press

Great Potential Press

GHF Press

Free Spirit Publishing

Royal Fireworks Press

Tumblehome Learning

AUS: Hawker Brownlow Education

Teachers College Press Columbia University

Information & Publications at NAGC

Books:

Books on Gifted Topics

TAGT Legacy Book Awards

Boost: 12 Effective Ways to Lift Up Our Twice-Exceptional Children (Perspectives) (Volume 11) (Amazon) January 2018

How to Be Everything: A Guide for Those Who (Still) Don’t Know What They Want to Be When They Grow Up (Amazon) May 2018

The Gifted Kids Workbook: Mindfulness Skills to Help Children Reduce Stress, Balance Emotions, and Build Confidence (Amazon) Release Date: August 2018

The Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners: Teaching the Four Essential Steps to Success (Grades 5–12) (Amazon) October 2017

UK: Redefining More Able Education: Key Issues for Schools (Amazon) April 2018

Doing Poorly on Purpose: Strategies to Reverse Underachievement and Respect Student Dignity (Amazon) January 2018

UK: Providing for the Special Needs of Students with Gifts and Talents (Amazon Kindle Edition) November 2017

Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties (Amazon) February 2018

The Cheetah Stories: Understanding the Challenges of Being Gifted

Trilogy: The School for Gifted Potentials (Amazon)

Bust Your Buts: Tips for Teens Who Procrastinate (Amazon)

If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice Exceptional (Amazon)

Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students: Helping Kids Cope with Explosive Feelings (2nd ed.) (Amazon)

Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties (Amazon)

Welcome to the Ark (Amazon)

Surviving the Applewhites (Amazon)

A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (Amazon)

Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner (Amazon)

Searching for Meaning: Idealism, Bright Minds, Disillusionment, and Hope (Amazon)

The Survival Guide for Gifted Kids: For Ages 10 and Under (Amazon)

Bright, Talented, & Black: A Guide for Families of African American Gifted Learners (Amazon)

Multicultural Gifted Education, 2nd ed. (Amazon)

Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism (Amazon)

Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary Executive Skills Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential (Amazon)

Off the Charts: Asynchrony and the Gifted Child (Amazon)

A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future (Amazon)

Exceptionally Gifted Children (Amazon)

Mellow Out, They Say If I Only Could: Intensities and Sensitivities of the Young and Bright (Amazon)

Gifted Children: Myths And Realities (Amazon)

The Mislabeled Child: Looking Beyond Behavior to Find the True Sources and Solutions for Children’s Learning Challenges (Amazon)

When the Labels Don’t Fit: A New Approach to Raising a Challenging Child (Amazon)

Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them (Amazon)

Kindling the Spark: Recognizing and Developing Musical Talent (Amazon)

Dumbing Down America: The War on Our Nation’s Brightest Young Minds (And What We Can Do to Fight Back) (Amazon)

Iowa Acceleration Scale Manual 3rd Edition (Amazon)

Parents’ Guide to IQ Testing and Gifted Education: All You Need to Know to Make the Right Decisions for Your Child (Amazon)

Genius Denied: How to Stop Wasting Our Brightest Young Minds (Amazon)

Curriculum Compacting: A Guide to Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction through Enrichment and Acceleration (Amazon)

Teaching Gifted Kids in Today’s Classroom: Strategies and Techniques Every Teacher Can Use (Amazon)

Education of the Gifted and Talented (6th Edition) (Amazon)

Jacob’s Ladder Reading Comprehension Program Set of 7, 2nd ed. (Prufrock)

Leonardo da Vinci (Amazon)

Blogs:

Blog: Gifts for Learning

Blog: Sprite’s Site

Blog: laughing@chaos

Blog: Gifted Challenges

Blog: The Deep End

Blog: Ramblings of a Gifted Teacher

Blog: Yellow Readis

Blog: My Twice Baked Potato

Blog: Institute for Educational Advancement Blog

Blog: Your Rainforest Mind

Blog: Crushing Tall Poppies

Blog: The Fringy Bit

Podcasts:

Mind Matters Podcasts

Podcast: Episode 8: A Guide to Self-Advocacy

Podcast: Episode 9: The Over-Under on Achievement

TILT Parenting Podcasts

Documentaries:

BBC Documentary: Generation Gifted

Documentary: 2e – Twice Exceptional

Documentary: RISE The Extraordinary Journey of the Exceptionally and Profoundly Gifted (Promo YouTube 7:19)

The Misdiagnosis of Gifted Children (YouTube 14:21)

Documentary: The G Word (in production)

Documentary: Breaking the Bee

Organizations:

Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented

National Society for the Gifted and Talented

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation

Belin-Blank Center

New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education

Chicago Gifted Community Center

Acceleration Institute

UNSW: GERRIC (AUS)

Other:

Google DOC: Blogs, Vlogs and Podcasts For The Gifted Community

AUS: Gifted and Talented Education Kit for Teachers (GERRIC) Free

Cybraryman’s Gifted and Talented Page

Hoagies Gifted

Byrdseed

Ginger Lewman: LifePractice Learning

Signal Fire Coaching

Image courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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Gifted Education on a Budget

gtchat 01112018 Budget

In the current state of educational funding, gifted programs are often the first to be cut or at least curtailed. With that in mind, this week’s chat considered ways to continue programs using creative sources of funding. It was reasoned that if schools were providing funds for other programs such as special education and sports, gifted education should be supported as well.

In the U.S., gifted education does not benefit from a national policy that includes funding but must rely on state governments to mandate and or fund programs for gifted students. Few states both mandate and fund programs while others designate unfunded mandates placing funding decisions on local school districts.

Chat participants were asked if  gifted students should  have to pay for extra activities such as academic competitions, field trips, etc. It was believed that when activities are substituted – designated – for gifted programming; ie, using Odyssey of the Mind as their gifted program (a regular in-school class); gifted students absolutely should not have to pay for these activities. When activities provided to all students in a school by an outside organization such as the PTA funding field trips, gifted students should not be required to pay for these activities.

The role of gifted organizations in influencing state budgets was then discussed. Their role is often caught in a ‘catch 22’ situation. States that fund gifted education have stronger state gifted organizations which in turn can have greater influence over state budgets. Most state organizations serve as advocates for funding. Larger organizations may have paid liaisons who work with state officials to secure funding.

What programming strategies are most cost-effective in gifted education? By far, acceleration leads in providing appropriate challenge and enrichment for the least cost to school districts. Early in and  early out strategies which are types of acceleration are extremely cost-efficient.

Technology use can certainly help gifted education budgets, but tech cannot replace gifted programming as the sole source of education for gifted students. Even with gifted students, good tech is enhanced with qualified facilitators.  Technology can fill both a personnel need and provide cost-effective measures in rural school districts that may not be able to afford highly-qualified educators for smaller populations of gifted students. Moreover, it can help gifted students to connect and collaborate with intellectual-peers in far-ranging geographical locations.

There are economic benefits to schools if they address the needs of gifted students. It was pointed out to the moderator years ago by a school board member that the less time a student spends in school (K-12) the more the district saves in educating that individual. Empowering students to achieve academic and personal goals will reap economic benefits to the local community when they become productive contributors and taxpayers to the local region. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2 PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Massachusetts’ State Gifted Board Member Speaks before Governor’s Budget Committee

Cluster Grouping of Gifted Students: How to Provide Full-Time Services on a Part-Time Budget

Possible Economic Benefits of Full-grade Acceleration https://goo.gl/Aad4y9

AUS: Meeting the Needs of Gifted Students through the Use of Subject Acceleration (pdf)

Gifted and Talented Education: A Review of Relevant Literature (pdf)

Committee for Education Funding: Analysis of Education Budget Fiscal Year 2018

NZ: Restored Funding and Hope for Gifted Education

Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program Funding Status

Kentucky Department of Education Gifted and Talented Coordinator Manual 2017 – 2018 (pdf)

TAGT: From a Nation Deceived to a Nation Empowered A Never-Ending Story (pdf – p. 6)

The Forgotten Rural Gifted Child

Rural Gifted Education and the Effect of Proximity (Abstract only)

What to Look for in a Good Gifted Program

Cybraryman’s Free or Inexpensive Supplies/Equipment for Your Classroom

Photo courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Connecting the Gifted Community

gtchat 03212017 Connecting

For the past 5 years, Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT has had the support of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented. This has enabled #gtchat to grow and flourish not only on Twitter,  but to encompass an expanded web presence on Storify, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube and a weekly post on the blog.

Connecting TAGT Staff2

With the Internet now an integral part of our lives, the choices to connect with like-minded people are ever-increasing. Many teachers have gravitated toward Twitter due to the expansive number of available educational chats (300+), ease of use, brevity of interactions, development of PLNs and the information about opportunities to connect offline at conferences and edCamps. A simple 30 minute daily commitment can provide a wealth of resources and contacts.

Connecting 2013 2016 Adv Board

A unique opportunity also exists for parents as participants in #gtchat as it is one of a very few Twitter chats that addresses the needs of both parents and teachers. Topics covered each week include a wide array of interests concerning the gifted community. Guests includes academics, psychologists, authors and leaders in the community. Twitter also provides a way for parents to connect both online and offline. Global #gtchat has arranged TweetUps at the international, national, and state level.

It was exciting to introduce our new #gtchat Advisory Board! You can connect with them on Twitter: Tracy Fisher @antraasa Ginger Lewman @GingerLewman Jeffrey Farley @FarleyJeffrey Jo Freitag @jofrei Heather Vaughn @msheathervaughn and Angie French @teachagiftedkid .

Connecting 2017 Adv Board

Thank you, also, to Mr. Jerry Blumengarten ( @cybraryman1) who was one of the original advisors of #gtchat from the beginning and a frequent contributor to #gtchat.

gtchat 03212017 Connecting Happy Birthday from Jerry

 

On a personal note: As I begin my 6th year as moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT, I look forward to facilitating the conversation for many more years to come. My contact information is listed below and I welcome your suggestions for topics, guests, and resources. A transcript of this chat can be found on our Storify page.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 14.00 NZDT/12.00 AEDT/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Cybraryman’s Twitter Educational Hashtags Page

Digital Learning Day: Social Media PD Best Practices

7 Tips for Getting the Most out of Twitter Chats

#gtchat on Participate Learn

#gtchat at the TAGT Website

Links for Portland Parents of Talented and Gifted Children

Social Networking – Impacting the World of Gifted Education

Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT Blog: Starting a Gifted Parents’ Group 

Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented (TAGT) Website

Twitter for Teachers – A Practical Guide to Get Started Today

6 Things Teachers Must Try This Summer!

Cybraryman’s Social Media Page

WISGIFT List-Serv (Wisconsin Gifted for advocates, educators, parents, and other supporters of gifted education)

Plymouth Gifted

Minnesota Council for the Gifted and Talented

Plymouth Gifted – 2017 Summer Opportunities

WCGTC 22nd Biennial Conference Registration

Gifted Homeschoolers Forum: Local and Regional Support

Minnesota Dept. of Education: Gifted Education

Hormel Foundation Gifted and Talented Symposium

AUS: Gifted Families Support Group Inc.

Sprite’s Site: The Twitter Stream

Gifted Homeschoolers Forum: Gifted Cubed

AUS: GERRIC at UNSW

Photo courtesy of Pixabay      CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

How to Use Twitter to Advocate for Gifted Education

gtchat 03222016 Advocate with Twitter

 

This week, #gtchat celebrated 4 years of support from the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented. Pictured below is the staff of TAGT and our Advisory Board. I am so thankful for the support they give me each and every week. #gtchat simply would not be possible without it. They are always a phone call or email away.

 

gtchat Thanks TAGT Staff

Texas Association for the Gifted & Talented Staff

 

gtchat Advisory Board 2016

Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT Advisory Board

 

During the TAGT 2015 in December, the question came up in one of my sessions, “How can we use Twitter to advocate for gifted education?” This led to the topic for this week’s #gtchat. Although I am admittedly biased, I believe Twitter is the best form of social media to use for advocacy. It is concise; to the point; and without the ‘drama’ of other platforms. As pointed out by #gtchat Advisor, Lisa Van Gemert, “Twitter is less susceptible to the echo chamber that you get in Facebook.” Twitter encourages and facilitates creation of communities with shared interests, desires, end goals. (Putnam) Twitter chats with a recognizable and unique hashtag promote a continuing conversation over time. Using appropriate hashtags wisely allows advocates to reach beyond the ‘choir’; outside the box.

“Twitter is less susceptible to the echo chamber that you get in Facebook.”

~ Lisa Van Gemert, the Gifted Guru

Advocacy via Twitter can be accomplished by retweeting, hashtagging and liking tweets. One can use Twitter to identify gifted education advocates or organizations and build relationships by ‘following’; using DMs; and adding to lists.  The strategic success of advocacy via Twitter requires a fluid and an evolving approach to using social media. Over time, other forms of social media may be used to supplement the reach of Twitter by tapping audience preferences.

“Twitter brings a much wider conversation; other social media can become silos.” ~ Dr. Brian Housand

How can gifted organizations use Twitter to advocate for gifted education/children & benefit their members? As the quote below reminds us, on Twitter organizations can simultaneously provide information, foster involvement and promote advocacy. (Lovejoy and Saxton) must commit to a

gtchat Organizations Information

long-term presence on social media; specifically Twitter and eschew ‘quick result’ strategies. Twitter provides conduit to reaching existing supporters and potential audiences; i.e., educators needing gifted classroom strategies. The ‘community’ paradigm can extend to fostering interaction between organizations for the greater good. Twitter can be used to forge an authentic voice; replicate print and web communications; and as a conversational tool. Organizations can also use Twitter to share information on upcoming conferences, webinars, and chats; always using hashtags to widen reach.

gtchat Tweet Smart

Parents, too, can use Twitter to advocate for gifted children and their education. Parents meeting on Twitter can facilitate in real life meetings for kids and their peers. By Participating in Twitter chats related to gifted education and gifted students, they are able to affirm positive messages about these kids. In several states, parents along with advocates have combined forces to use Twitter to effectively appeal to politicians considering gifted education legislation. Tracy Fisher, #gtchat Advisor, told us, “Part of advocating is LEARNING! They can lurk, ask experts for info, etc.”

“It is easy to share with several groups of people by using multiple hashtags.” ~ Tyler Clark, Executive Assistant of the World Council for Gifted & Talented Children

Twitter is often used at gifted conferences as a backchannel for attendees as well as presenters. It is used to initially promote and raise awareness about upcoming conferences. Then, Conference attendees can use conference-specific hashtags to tweet from sessions. Presenters use Twitter to connect with their audience and get immediate feedback during sessions. It’s even a great way to plan Tweet-ups at the conferences!

“Commentary tweets and special twitter sessions from conferences can give people a vicarious feeling of attending.” ~ Jo Freitag, Gifted Resources & Sprite’s Site

 

“A conference can encourage social media participation before and during the conference; including all!” Carolyn K., Hoagies Gifted

Finally, we discussed how to  use Twitter to connect with peers and colleagues to advocate for gifted issues. Gifted advocates can connect with leaders in the field in real-time to tweet issues important to all. It can be used to acknowledge accomplishments within the gifted community; announce new books; and link to relevant blog posts. Users can encourage followers to connect by tagging them in tweets and graphics. It’s an excellent way to build communities of like-minded advocates. A transcript of the chat may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at  Noon  NZST/110.00 AEST/1.00 UK (Subject to change due to Daylight Savings Time). to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Cybraryman’s Educational Websites Page

Sprite’s Site: The Twitter Stream

gtchat Sprites Site Twitter Stream

Cybraryman’s Educational Sites: Edcamps, Teach Meets and Conferences

Sprite’s Site: Global GT Chat on Twitter

gtchat Sprites Site GT Chat on Twitter

Tweeting Social Change: How Social Media are Changing Nonprofit Advocacy

How Organizations Use Social Media: Engaging the Public

Tweet, Tweet! Using Live Twitter Chats in Social Work Education

8 Tips for Effectively Using Social Media for Social Change

Cases on Strategic Social Media Utilization in the Nonprofit Sector (Amazon)

Connecting with Social Media to Drive Change (Amazon)

Users of the World, Unite! The Challenges & Opportunities of Social Media (pdf 2010)

Social Media Best Practices for Nonprofit Organizations (pdf)

Information, Community & Action: How Nonprofit Organizations Use Social Media (Prezi)

Dialogic Connections (Shaw) (pdf)

Chirping for Charity: How U.S. Nonprofits are Using Twitter to Foster Dialogic Communication (pdf)

 

Photos courtesy of morgueFile , Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain , Jo Freitag

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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