Monthly Archives: October 2017

Does Differentiation Work for Gifted Students?

gtchat 10172017 Differentiation

While differentiation may meet the needs of many students, there’s a unique pedagogy of differentiation appropriate for gifted students. (Kettler) Differentiation for gifted students may include pre-assessment, curriculum compacting, and modifying curriculum/instruction.

Is differentiation for high-ability students as effective as for other students? All learning should be individualized to some extent,  but not all gifted students will respond the same. The quality and type of differentiation can affect outcomes. Educators should be open to change when necessary.

There may be better ways to accommodate the needs of some gifted students. Differentiated  instruction is only one way to meet their needs. Gifted students may respond better with peer-grouping.  For highly or profoundly gifted students, it may not be possible to differentiate age-based curriculum enough to challenge them.

There are some common barriers to effective differentiation. They include believing how to differentiate and to assess are set in stone; the teacher is unable to deviate from the program. Looking at differentiation as an ‘add-on’ rather than integrating it can also be a barrier.

In order to implement differentiated instruction, teachers need to start slow –anchor activities to deepen students’ understanding of a concept; enrich skills you want them to acquire. Continue by offering more choice more often; reflect on progress;  and involve parents when implementing it.

What should be considered when using differentiated instruction?  Product (student choice) and content delivery must be taken into consideration when differentiating instruction. Consider the process: tiered activities, curriculum ladders, higher-level questioning and open-ended activities. Consider assessment as well as pace and depth which also contribute to high quality differentiated instruction. A transcript is available on our Storify page.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Links:

The Pedagogy of Differentiation Moving from Strategies to Learning Design (pdf) (Kettler)

Why Differentiation Misses the Mark for Gifted Students

Using Differentiated Instruction for Gifted Learners

Defensible Differentiation: Why, What & How (pdf)

How to Differentiate Instruction in Academically Diverse Classrooms, 3rd Edition (Amazon)

Fair Isn’t Always Equal: Assessment & Grading in the Differentiated Classroom (Amazon)

Understanding Differentiated Instruction: Building a Foundation for Leadership (Book Chapter)

Teaching a Class with Big Ability Differences

18 Teacher-Tested Strategies for Differentiated Instruction

Compacting Contract (pdf)

A Starter Kit for Differentiated Instruction

Differentiation for Gifted

Leading Differentiation

Helping Gifted Kids Soar (pdf)

Sprite’s Site – De Bono’s 6 Action Shoes 9: One Size Shoe Cover System

Cybraryman’s Differentiated Instruction

Culturally Responsive Classrooms: Affirming Culturally Different Gifted Students (pdf)

Underrepresentation of High-Achieving Students of Color in Gifted Programs

Racial Bias in Gifted and Talented Placement, and What to Do about It

Pic courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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Using Technology to Engage GT Students

gtchat 10102017 Ed Tech

Technology can be an excellent way to engage gifted students. They can use the Internet to link to more “knowledgeable peers and experts” and collaborate on projects. Online connections can assist GT students to locate mentors who can scaffold their learning.

Tech tools can help teachers differentiate for a wider range of abilities with increasingly sophisticated programs. Technology can provide platforms for students to advance at their own pace; utilize distance learning; and engage in independent study.

Research shows that gifted and talented students use tech to do creative and  social learning activities in the classroom. Teachers can look for small changes in student engagement; this will impact student achievement. If you notice attendance is up and students want to be in your classroom, it may be because they can use tech to demonstrate proficiency.

How can technology help 2E students (i.e., Asperger’s/EFD) be more engaged in school? Many twice-exceptional (2E) kids respond well to computer programming that eliminates emotion in instruction and provides patience in interactions. Also, they can use smartphones and tablets to organize schedules and assignments.

Parents can support the use of technology in their child’s school. A student’s  technology-rich life outside of the classroom can serve to support learning that goes on at school (Siegle, 2004). Students who do not have access to computers outside of school may fall behind academically (Neuman & Celano, 2006).

Check out the links below to see what technology was most liked by chat participants.  A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Technology and the Unseen World of Gifted Students (pdf 2004)

Using Technology in Gifted & Talented Education Classrooms: The Teachers’ Perspective (pdf)

High-Tech Teaching Success! A Guide to Using Innovative Tech in Your Classroom (Prufrock Press)

Giftedness and Technology

Help Gifted and Talented Students with Technology

Is classroom technology good for learning or wasting time?

Factors Affecting School Teachers’ Perceptions of Instructional Benefits of Digital Technology (pdf)

8 Ways to Use Technology to Engage Students Better 

Is Technology Helping or Harming My Students?

Handheld Technology in the Classroom: Respecting & Meeting the Needs of All Writers 

Helping Kids Get Organized Some Suggestions for Parents (pdf)

Learning in the 21st Century: How to Connect, Collaborate & Create (Amazon)

Personal Computers Help Gifted Students Work Smart (1990)

Strategies for the Tech-Savvy Classroom (Prufrock Press)

Explore the Garden (Edufest 2017)

Using the Schoolwide Enrichment Model with Technology (Amazon)

Tech Tools & Resources to Whet Your Appetite (Slideshare)

5 New Edtech tools for Teachers

Edmodo.com

Flipgrid.com

Cybraryman’s Tech Integration for the Gifted Page

Padlet.com

iPiccy: Leveraging Thought Bubbles to Differentiate Learning (YouTube 5:21)

Wonderopolis An excellent website to support reading, writing, and curiosity (YouTube 4:20)

Shazam: Writing techniques using technology (YouTube 1:05:03)

Using Word Clouds 21st Century Gifted Students (YouTube 55:45)

Vocaroo.com

QRCode Monkey

ClassDojo.com

Aurasam.com

RemindHQ.com

Let’s Recap

Kahoot!

Doink.com

Kahn Academy

Learning Ally (2E)

Breakout EDU

Photo courtesy of Flickr   CC BY-NC 2.0

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

When Gifted Kids Don’t Fit In

gtchat 10032017 Fit

Explaining giftedness to a child is often overlooked; assuming they understand all the intricacies of being identified gifted. It’s important for children to understand; otherwise, they may accept myths perpetuated by society. Being gifted is more than simply academic achievement or excellence in everything. It’s knowing that it is ok to fail or be less than expected.

Anxiety can play a role in a gifted child’s need to ‘fit in’. Adults may place unfair expectations on children based on their perception of ‘gifted’ and that is hard to live up to at times. Just because a child may not ‘fit it’ doesn’t mean they don’t want to and experience anxiety trying to be something they’re not.

Asynchronous development can also affect a gifted kid’s ability to ‘fit in’. For some gifted kids, asynchronous development can severely affect their ability to engage with age-peers. It can affect how adults interact with gifted kids and perceive how they should act.

How can teachers assist gifted students with fitting in at school? It’s helpful if teachers take time to learn about giftedness; increase their understanding of these kids. Teachers’ expectations should not include using students as teacher aides which can be source of bullying for gifted child.

Parents can help to ensure a good fit in the family as well. Like teachers, parents too must take time to learn about and understand what giftedness is and isn’t. They should guard against favoritism; delegation of tasks; and resource allocation of family funds. Parents can also try to provide opportunities for positive interaction with intellectual peers beyond school walls.

Learning the difference between ‘better at’ and ‘better than’ will go a long way in getting accepted by age-peers. Gifted kids should work to understand their abilities. Positive self-image ultimately benefits in how they relate to others. Developing a sense who what’s important to them; gifted kids may decide not to go along with the crowd to fit in.

An important take-away from the chat was that although it’s natural for kids to want to fit in with age-peers; conversely, gifted kids should also learn that it’s also okay not to ‘fit in’ if they don’t want to do so. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social & Emotional Needs (Amazon)

The Gifted Kids’ Survival Guide: For Ages 10 & Under (Amazon)

Gifted Children Need a Place to Belong Gifted Children Need a Place to Belong

Gifted Students Often Struggle Socially

10 Facts You May Not Know about Gifted Children But Should

Friendship 101

How to Find Friends

Young, Gifted & Likely to Suffer for It

Gifted Children & Friendships – Why Don’t I Fit In?

How to Help your Gifted Kid Thrive

The Curse of the Gifted & Talented Child

Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students

Should We Tell Them They’re Gifted?

Is Your Child Anxious Because They’re Gifted?

Guess What? Gifted Kids Can Have Problems Too

10 Lessons from Gifted Education 

How to Help Your Overthinking Gifted Child

Sprite’s Site: Discovering the Depth and Breadth of Giftedness

Sprite’s Site: Belonging – A Place of Sanctuary

What to Say to Your Gifted Child…about Being Gifted

Gifted Children’s Bill of Rights

Common Characteristics of Gifted Individuals

Hoagies’ Blog Hop May 2014: The “G” Word “Gifted”

Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

TAGT Summit: Serving Secondary G/T Students

giftED17 Logo

On Wednesday, November 29th from 9:00 am – 4:15 pm, TAGT will be holding a day long Summit dedicated to serving secondary gifted and talented students prior to their annual conference, giftED17, in Houston, TX.

Secondary educators and district or campus leaders will explore and become empowered with diverse resources to meet the academic and social and emotional needs of gifted students. Participants will network, identify needs specific to secondary GT classrooms, and begin to solve the challenges around serving these students in the secondary setting.

Summit attendees will hear directly from secondary G/T students, our ultimate stakeholders about how they can be better served and what they wish we knew.

The summit includes time for table conversations allowing for reflection and to discussion around challenges encountered with fellow educators and leaders. Participants will also breakout, choosing two sessions that will cover topics such as classroom strategies around Early College High Schools, Dual Credit, and AP/IB Differentiation and Placing, Developing, and Evaluating G/T Teachers.

Postma Mike

Dr. Michael Postma

A networking lunch, free with registration, will be followed by the keynote address by Mike Postma, Ph.D., Executive Director of SENG (Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted). Postma will examine the challenges our gifted secondary students face and share strategies to help.

As a teacher, one of the most interesting parts of my job was the ongoing task of having to be innovative. In order to be a good educator for my students, I had to be a constant student myself, learning about new ideas, techniques, and technologies. It was important for me to stay one step ahead of my students while being flexible enough to learn from them as well. This is what makes the art of teaching so exciting: you never quite know what fresh experience the day might bring.”                                                                             ~ Dr. Michael Postma in The Inconvenient Student 

Afterwards, join a panel of experienced G/T professionals to explore best practices in identifying students who may otherwise be missed.  The panel will discuss how to ensure diversity of G/T populations and equitable access to services, including intentional cross-departmental partnerships, planning and conversations and both qualitative and quantitative data.

Finally, the day will be concluded with a Topic Roundtable & Curriculum Share. Participants will choose 3-4 meaningful topics as table facilitators lead conversations around your lingering questions. Potential topics include:

  • Rural schools
  • AP/IB Differentiation activities
  • Parent outreach
  • Lesson sharing
  • Social-Emotional Curriculum
  • School scheduling
  • Enrichment Programs, Mentorship
  • Advocating within school/district
  • Soliciting and Implementing Student Feedback

Registration may be found here. (Early registration ends October 11th) Not from Texas? TAGT is offering member prices for anyone belonging to their state’s gifted organization. G/T teachers, G/T program leaders, and campus administrators may register by selecting the 1-day giftED17 option or join us for the full conference. You must register via mail using a pdf form found here. Limited space is available and you must RSVP here once you are registered for the summit.

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