Category Archives: Twice-exceptional

Managing Behavioral Issues in Gifted Youth

How society views the nonconforming behavior of many gifted children has often been detrimental to the well-being and self-perception as a gifted child. It perpetuates the myth that these children are misfits and need to be fixed or reigned in somehow. It can’t be underscored enough that responsible adults in a GT child’s sphere of influence must advocate on their behalf. Societal pressures can have long-lasting, negative effects on their behavior. By failing to understand the underpinnings of a gifted child’s behavior, society places undue expectations and negative consequences for those deemed too different, too sensitive, too perfectionistic.

A misdiagnosis of a gifted child can lead to profoundly inappropriate responses to behaviors they are displaying. Although there are children who are twice-exceptional, many gifted behaviors may be misdiagnosed as a comorbid disorder; but aren’t. Misdiagnosis can lead to inappropriate educational placements, unnecessary medical interventions, and reactionary parenting due to misunderstood behaviors. It is extremely important that parents and educators rely on the services of professionals experienced in dealing with gifted individuals when seeking help in diagnosing behaviors of gifted children.

Asynchronous development is manifested in gifted children by high intellectual ability, but maturity levels closer to age-peers. Adults who don’t understand the distinction often misread behaviors and respond with punitive consequences. It can be an overlooked indication of giftedness. An angry or defiant child may just be feeling misunderstood. A bored child may be seen as not paying attention. A bossy child may be trying to express advanced knowledge. It’s important for parents to constantly remind themselves that gifted kids are still kids who need guidance and nurturing. When confronted with real-life fears and trauma, they need emotional support just like any other kid.

What unique behavioral challenges do twice-exceptional children face? Our twice-exceptional population is one of the least recognized in education today. Little attention is paid to this group of students in teacher prep programs or professional development. This can lead to inappropriate placement as well as interventions. Twice-exceptional students – #2ekids – are far too often recommended for special education services when gifted classes would benefit them so much more. Their behaviors can be exacerbated by failing to recognize their intellectual abilities. They do exhibit challenging behaviors, but it’s the responsibility of adults to find appropriate ways to manage these behaviors. Accommodating their strengths before remediating weaknesses is an important first step.

What strategies can be used in the classroom to promote positive behaviors in GT students? The late Barbara Clark (Growing Up Gifted) suggested GT kids be placed with intellectual peers and teachers who enjoyed teaching them; be exposed to a challenging, deep and complex curriculum; and given guidance to understand the nature of giftedness. Managing classroom behaviors of gifted students begins with acknowledging they will become bored and need differentiated and challenging curricular activities. If they challenge your authority, don’t take it personally; be understanding. Providing ample opportunities for student choice and voice in the classroom can reduce misbehavior and increase engagement.

What preventative strategies can parents use to reduce negative behaviors at home? Building a relationship based on honesty, respect for their opinions, and spending quality time together is way to reduce negative behaviors at home. Offer choices, rather than demands. Provide intellectually stimulating activities. Parents should teach their gifted child strategies for controlling their emotions, such as, mindfulness. It’s also important to teach respect for others’ perspectives which will benefit them throughout their lives.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10AM AEST/1AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gtchatmod

Resources:

How to Discipline your Gifted Child | Dr. Gail Post

Tips for Parents: Managing Frustration and Difficult Feelings in Gifted Children | Davidson Gifted

Classroom Management for Gifted and Twice-Exceptional Students Using Functional Behavior Assessment: A Step-by-Step Professional Learning Program for Teachers (book)

Behaviour, Emotions, Social Development: Gifted and Talented Children

Emotional and Behavioral Characteristics of Gifted Children and Their Families

Psychological Misdiagnosis of Gifted and Talented Children

Implementing Successful Behavioral Interventions with Gifted Students

Giftedness & ADHD: A Strengths-Based Perspective and Approach https://bit.ly/3ExhyMi

Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnosis of Gifted Children (Webb) | SENG

Gifted Children and Behavioral Problems

Gifted Students Need a Personalized Approach to Education

7 Ways to Help Your Strong-Willed Gifted Child Thrive

Unlocking the Potential of Gifted Kids with ADHD | ADDitude Magazine

How to Recognize a Gifted Child’s Behavior Problems

Four Ways To Reduce Behavior Problems | Byrdseed

Giftedness in Young Children: What Do Parents and Teachers Know? (pdf)

Lessons From Psychotherapy That Inform Counseling Gifted Students: What We Know and Future Opportunities (pdf) | Florida State University

Tall Tales: When your Gifted Child Lies to You | Dr. Gail Post

Disciplining Smart Kids

How to Not Argue With Your Gifted Child

Mislabeled Behavior and Giftedness

Life with a Challenging Child: What to do When your Gifted but Difficult Child is Driving you Crazy | SENG

Today’s Disruptors can be Tomorrow’s Innovators | thinkLawUS

Disciplining Gifted Children

Discipline and the Gifted Child

Image courtesy of Pixabay   Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Perspectives on Giftedness

For decades, educators, academics, professionals in the field, parents and even those identified as gifted have tried to define the term ‘gifted’ with few reaching consensus. Today’s chat will explore different perspectives about giftedness. The terms educationally and psychologically gifted are terms used by some to distinguish between individuals with different needs in school. Other terms frequently used include high achievers or profoundly gifted. 2Es or twice exceptional students are labeled ‘gifted’, but also experience learning challenges. It’s important to consider a student’s strengths and address those before deficits.

What does it mean to be ‘more’ regarding gifted children and why does it matter? When the idea of ‘more’ is introduced in discussing gifted children, concerns about behavior are generally the issue. The source or reason for intense behaviors is debatable in academic circles, but rarely for parents. It is important to recognize and address out of the ordinary behaviors of a child who is identified as gifted to ensure their well-being as well as their ability to achieve academically and gain important social skills to be successful in life. In recent years, the importance of SEL or social-emotional learning has gained recognition among educators and parents. For GT kids, the assumption was that they would be fine on their own. This is no longer the case.

What challenges do twice-exceptional students face at school and in life? Initially, recognition of the existence of twice-exceptional students is paramount to providing appropriate educational opportunities. Failure to do so can result in students receiving only remedial services. Twice-exceptional students are often misunderstood both in school and by society at large. Challenging behaviors or academic deficits can result in students being misplaced in special education rather than placement in gifted programs. Inappropriate placement in school can lead to life-long consequences for twice-exceptional students whose most urgent needs are never met. It can have disastrous effects on life and career outcomes.

Pathologizing a gifted child’s behavior – labeling normal behavior as abnormal – is like trying to fix a problem which does not exist. Interventions, inappropriate treatments and even drug therapy can do more harm than good. For parents, in particular, it is extremely important to engage with professionals who have qualified experience working with gifted children. Pathologizing gifted behaviors may result in misdiagnosis which can lead to unmet needs or even more serious problems for their child.

Parents may wonder if they should tell their child they have been identified as gifted. However, its important to explain giftedness before they learn about it from unqualified sources or form their own opinions based on misinformation. Gifted children need to understand that they are more than a label assigned to them in order to receive services at school. That understanding involves realizing they are not better than, but rather better at. Understanding the nature of giftedness will help a gifted child to realize it’s okay to make mistakes or even fail at times; it’s not an excuse for poor behavior; and they may view the world around them differently than their age peers.

What does giftedness look like in adulthood? Gifted adults may or may not recognize their own giftedness based on their individual life experiences. Unfortunately, there is a tendency to only view eminent or high achieving adults as ever being gifted. Psychologists’ offices are filled with gifted adults experiencing anxiety, intense emotions, perfectionism, an acute sense of loneliness due to an inability to connect with others, existential depression, and so much ‘more’.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10AM AEST/1AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

The Columbus Group Conference | Gifted Parenting Support

Gifted Myths: An Easy-to-Read Guide to Myths on the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional (book)

Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling

If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice Exceptional

Your Rainforest Mind: A Guide to the Well-Being of Gifted Adults and Youth

Behavioral Profiles of Clinically Referred Children with Intellectual Giftedness | BioMed Research International

Homeschooling Gifted Students: Considerations for Research and Practice (pdf) | IGI Global

Dwelling on the Right Side of the Curve: An Exploration of the Psychological Wellbeing of Parents of Gifted Children (pdf)

New Brain Mapping Technique Highlights Relationship Between Connectivity and IQ | Neuroscience News

“Choosing our Histories” by Kevin Gover, Baccalaureate Address 2016 | Brown University

The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star (book)

Bright Adults: Uniqueness and Belonging across the Lifespan (book)

Comparison of Cognitive, Psychosocial, and Adaptive Behavior Profiles among Gifted Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

Gifted … You Know What That Means, Right?

When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social and Emotional Needs (book)

Serving Highly & Profoundly Gifted Learners (pdf)

Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth | Vanderbilt University

Behavioral Profiles of Clinically Referred Children with Intellectual Giftedness | Biomed Research International

Images courtesy of GHF Learners, Celi Trepanier, Dr. Gail Post, Stacie Brown McCullough, and Paula Prober.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Resources and Tools for Supporting 2E Learners

Twice-exceptional learners, an oft misunderstood group, are those students with exceptional high abilities as well as exceptional challenges. These kids exhibit high intellectual levels while also having significant special needs such as ADD/ADHD; Asperger’s or ASD; sensory issues; ODD;  or SPD (specific learning disability). Representing up to 20% (Oak Foundation) of students, twice-exceptional learners are too often overlooked in academic settings (affecting educational opportunities) and face misdiagnosis leading to inappropriate interventions.

Please check out the resources below as well as in the transcript which can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10AM AEST/1AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Project 2e-ASD Strategies for Gifted Students with ASD (Updates Blog) | UCONN

Project 2e-ASD (website) | UCONN  

Conversations with The G Word #3: 2e, 3e & Neurodiversity (FB – ZOOM 1:13)

What is a Twice Exceptional Student? (FB Video 5:32) | Bright & Quirky

The Neurodiversity Podcast Blog

Bridges 2e Center

What is 2e? A Guide to Twice-Exceptionality

Susan Baum on Twice-Exceptionality (YouTube 4:19)

The Mythology of Learning, Part 1 Abandoning Deficit Models: A Paradigm Shift

The 2e Profile: Multiple Perspectives

2e News (website)

TECA (Twice Exceptional Children’s Advocacy)

SENG (Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted)

Twice-Exceptional Learners The Journey Toward a Shared Vision (pdf)

Twice-Exceptional Students | NAGC

Bright and Quirky (website)

How Teachers Can Help Students with Challenging Behaviors

Bright and Quirky (Blog)

To Be Gifted and Learning Disabled, 3rd ed.: Strength-Based Strategies for Helping Twice-Exceptional Students with LD, ADHD, ASD, and More

Twice-Exceptional Gifted Children: Understanding, Teaching, and Counseling Gifted Students

Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties 1st Edition

Boost: 12 Effective Ways to Lift Up Our Twice-Exceptional Children

Navigating the Transition from High School to College for Students with Disabilities (book)

Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Clinical Handbook (book) | Oxford Clinical Psychology

101 School Success Tools for Smart Kids with Learning Difficulties

Parenting Bright Kids Who Struggle in School: A Strength-Based Approach to Helping Your Child Thrive and Succeed

Creativity in Gifted Students with ASD

Cybraryman’s Twice-Exceptional Page

The 2E Resource: Teach Tools and Strategies

ADHD Bedtime Routine: How to Create One You Don’t Hate

Twice Exceptional (Blog)

The 2E Resource

Montgomery County Public Schools: A Guidebook for Twice Exceptional Students Supporting the Achievement of Gifted Students with Special Needs (pdf)

Montgomery County Public Schools: Twice Exceptional Students A STAFF GUIDEBOOK for Supporting the Achievement of Gifted Students with Disabilities (pdf)

Twice-Exceptional Students Gifted Students with Disabilities Level 1: An Introductory Resource Book Second Edition (pdf)

2e Newsletter Past Issues

How to ADHD (YouTube Channel)

Tilt Parenting (website)

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Metacognition and Social Development

Metacognition is the process by which we monitor and control (self-regulation) our own cognitive process. It can be explicit (slow and deliberative) or implicit (rapid, automatic and without awareness). A1Metacognition involves thinking about thinking; self-awareness; building an understanding of self in the context of one’s environment; mentalizing (considering mental states of others). Understanding one’s own behavior can benefit from the assessment of our behavior by others. Metacognition affects willpower, assigning blame, regret for one’s actions, agency, free will, and decision making.

Metacognition’s main function is to enhance social interaction when we communicate our thoughts to others. (Firth, 2012) Social metacognition includes one’s beliefs about others’ mental processes in light of situational norms and cultural expectations. It allows us to consider and discuss aspects of our perceptual and decision-making processes with others; thus improving our own decisions.

Should ‘intellectual character’ be an aim of education? Intellectual character involves curiosity, attentiveness, intellectual humility, open-mindedness, tenacity, and courage. When intellectual character is a main focus in education, healthy social and emotional development becomes a key element in student achievement and success. Teaching intellectual character can greatly enhance effective thinking. It can teach students to value knowledge over close-mindedness. It can also help them to decipher truth from opinion.

Why should a gifted/2E student be taught metacognition? Teaching metacognition can help students create a positive self-identity, develop social skills, learn emotional regulation, develop vocabulary to express deep thoughts and emotions, and learn executive functioning skills. Metacognition plays a strong role in collaboration; working well with others. Gifted students often struggle with participating in group work and the expectations of others regarding their behavior in these settings. Understanding metacognition can help gifted/2E students to better understand themselves; how neurodiversity can be seen as a strength; and to see intensities, not as pathological, but a manageable part of who they are.

Strategies which can be used to teach metacognition include bibliotherapy, mentoring, teaching resiliency, reframing what is ‘normal’, and cultivating student strengths and interests. (Postma) Employing a regulation checklist can be useful in teaching metacognition. A checklist can improve cognitive regulation and individual student performance. Classroom strategies which can be used to teach metacognition may include creating mnemonic devices to enhance memory, teaching word analysis and listening skills, and active reading strategies.

Metacognition is a blank slate at birth that is written on by social interactions; such as, talking to others, listening to stories and looking at pictures. Parents have significant influence in these initial interactions. Children begin to reflect on the relationship between action and knowledge at about age 4. Introspection influences behavior and parents can provide opportunities for them to gain requisite knowledge to enable good decisions regarding behavior.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10AM AEST/1AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Modeling Structural Relationships of Metacognitive States with Tendency to Virtual Networks through Mediating of Social Adjustment in Gifted Students | Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology   

Clarifying the Connections among Giftedness, Metacognition, Self-Regulation, and Self-Regulated Learning: Implications for Theory and Practice | Gifted Child Quarterly

Development of Metacognitive Concepts about Thinking in Gifted and Nongifted Children: Recent Research (Abstract) | Learning and Individual Differences Vol. 8 Issue 4

A Metacognitive Portrait of Gifted Learners | International Handbook on Giftedness

Building Metacognition in Gifted Students for Future Success | GHF Dialogue

Cognitive Characteristics of the Gifted: Reconceptualized in the Context of Inquiry Learning and Teaching | Critical Issues and Practices in Gifted Education

Smart People or Smart Contexts? Cognition, Ability, and Talent Development in an Age of Situated Approaches to Knowing and Learning | Educational Psychologist

Developmental and Cognitive Characteristics of “High-Level Potentialities” (Highly Gifted) Children | International Journal of Pediatrics

Competitive Goal Orientations, Quality, and Stability in Gifted and Other Adolescents’ Friendships A Test of Sullivan’s Theory About the Harm Caused by Rivalry | Gifted Child Quarterly

Metacognition and Flexibility: Qualitative Differences in How Gifted Children Think | Talents Unfolding: Cognition and Development

Metacognitive Awareness Scale, Domain Specific (MCAS-DS): Assessing Metacognitive Awareness during Raven’s Progressive Matrices | Frontiers in Psychology

Meta-Reasoning: Monitoring and Control of Thinking and Reasoning | Trends in Cognitive Sciences

The Relation between Student’s Effort and Monitoring Judgments during Learning: A Meta-analysis | Educational Psychology Review

Metacognitive Experience on Raven’s Matrices Versus Insight Problems | Metacognition and Learning

Links between Intellectual Humility and Acquiring Knowledge | The Journal of Positive Psychology

Educating for Intellectual Virtues (pdf)

Finding Middle Ground between Intellectual Arrogance and Intellectual Servility: Development and Assessment of the Limitations-owning Intellectual Humility Scale (pdf) | Personality and Individual Differences

Human Metacognition across Domains: Insights from Individual Differences and Neuroimaging | Personality Neuroscience

The Influence of Metacognitive Skills on Learners’ Memory of Information in a Hypermedia Environment | Journal of Educational Computing Journal

The Role of Metacognition in Human Social Interactions | U.S. National Institutes of Health

Social Metacognition: Using Social Emotional Learning to Defeat Helplessness and Engage Hope

Cybraryman’s The Brain and Brain Games Page

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom | Edutopia

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

%d bloggers like this: