Monthly Archives: October 2016

Least Restrictive Environment for Gifted Students

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Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) is a phrase that is usually associated with Special Education. In that regard, it implies that students needing support will receive it in an inclusive environment; the general education classroom. LRE presupposes that students will benefit socially and academically when grouped with age-mates.

However, when applying  LRE to Gifted Education; it has an inverse connotation.For gifted students, a regular classroom may constitute a restrictive environment. Gifted students often work at ‘keeping behind’ to not appear too different from age-peers. (Hershey, 2010)

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Who should decide what is the Least Restrictive Environment for a particular student? All stakeholders should be involved in placing student ~ the student, parent, teacher, IEP team (if available).  Multiple criteria should be considered in any placement decisions ~ don’t rely on single assessment.

There are no specific laws for dealing with Least Restrictive Environment as it relates to Gifted Education. Twice Exceptional students may use portions of federal law in the U.S. to seek accommodations pertaining to special education only.

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How can a parent advocate for LRE? Parents should educate themselves about state regulations pertaining to gifted education; learn the vocabulary. They need to make the case that there are consequences when gifted students languish in an unchallenging environment.

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When the Least Restrictive Environment cannot be achieved, there are alternatives. Parents and students should push for open opportunities such as standalone programs, acceleration, and ability grouping. Other alternatives can include mentorships, independent study, and online options. A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 13.00 NZST/11.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

What is the Legal Definition of Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)? 

Least Restrictive Environment for Gifted Kids

Educational Options for Gifted Learners

The Zone of Proximal Development in Child Cognitive Theory

When Schools Don’t Meet Your Gifted Child’s Needs

What Do Students Who Are Intellectually Gifted Say They Experience & Need in Inclusive Classroom?

Gifted & Talented Program (Prezi)

Position Statement: Grouping

PA Association for Gifted Education: Inclusion (pdf)

Montgomery Co Public Schools: Guidebook for Twice Exceptional Students (pdf)

NRCGT: The Law on Gifted Education (pdf)

Eric Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education: FAQs on Inclusion

The Least Restrictive Environment for Gifted and Talented Students (T&F Preview: Roeper Review)

IDEA Applies To ‘Twice Exceptional’ Students Too 

Special Education Rights and Responsibilities Information on Least Restrictive Environment (pdf)

Picture courtesy of Pixabay.  CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

College Planning for Gifted Teens

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This week, we welcomed Dr. Gail Post to #gtchat to chat about College Planning for Gifted Teens. Dr. Post is a Clinical Psychologist in practice for 30 years near Philadelphia and blogger at Gifted Challenges. She started her blog to advocate, explore, and raise questions about the social and emotional aspects of giftedness.

Gifted teens need to start thinking about college when they enter high school. They should begin to consider what interests them, the classes they take and their extracurriculars; but not forgetting to enjoy their high school years. Parents, too, should be planning. They can take an active role in doing a reality check with their teen regarding financial aid, admittance rates for particular colleges, availability of scholarships and remembering that not all colleges will be a ‘good fit’. Dr. Post recommended taking “the most challenging courses available -AP, IB, honors, and dual enrollment at local colleges; extracurriculars that are meaningful, challenging – go for depth of learning.” She added, “Volunteer activities in areas that are meaningful, research, sports, creative arts, competitions, community efforts” are all important additions to a teen’s portfolio.

Quote courtesy of teacher, Margie Madsen Tyner

“If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Wherever you are – if you are following your bliss, you are enjoying that refreshment, that life within you, all the time.” ~ Joseph Campbell

An important part of college planning is college entrance exams. Dr. Post explained, “Most schools don’t tell families about importance of preparing for PSATs and SAT subject tests. A high score above state cut-off on PSATs in 11th grade will open up several opportunities including National Merit Finalist status. This can help a LOT with college admissions, scholarships, and some “free ride” offers from colleges. When it comes to SATs and ACTs, she suggests, “Some teens do better on ACTs or SATs – take both to see which is best reflection of abilities.”

What financial considerations should gifted teens consider in selecting a college? Dr. Post said, “Cost is absolutely critical – parents MUST BE CLEAR from the start about what they can afford. Don’t assume the college will come through with merit scholarships that will put a big dent in the cost – plan accordingly. Few colleges are “need-blind”; many are “need-aware” and that can affect your chances for acceptance unfortunately. No college is worth years of extreme debt – even gifted kids can find their niche at any college. If a state school is what is affordable, an honors college at the school can be a great option.”

It’s important that gifted teens find the right social and emotional fit in a college. “Teens should visit colleges, sit in classes and extracurriculars of interest; meet students; get sense of whether it’s a good fit, ” said Dr. Post. She went on to say, “Consider honors programs, elite schools, or substance-free, social justice or special interest dorms to find similar peers. [Teens should] identify a list of needs related to fit and prioritize them. Consider social and emotional needs [such as] proximity and travel to home, school size, partying or Greek culture, quirkiness and traditional factors. They need to prepare for an adjustment: small fish-big pond, learning how to study for the first time, needing help, or not fitting in.”

There are many places teens and parents can go to learn about potential colleges. All schools have websites and most have social media outlets which can give prospective students information and a glimpse of campus life. A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 13.00 NZST/11.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Ten Essential Tips to Help Your Gifted Teen Plan for College

Sending Your Gifted Child to College: Providing Support when Fears Arise

Choosing the Right College for Gifted Students: The Fit Factor

Five Tips Gifted Students Need to Consider when Choosing a College

College Planning for Gifted Students: Choosing & Getting into the Right College (Amazon)

Seven College Planning Pitfalls (and how to avoid them)

Choose Wisely: Some Truths about Elite Colleges for Gifted Students

Our Dangerous Obsession with Harvard, Stanford and Other Elite Universities

Where College Admissions Went Wrong

Survey: Elite Colleges Don’t Buy Happiness for Graduates

SAT Subject Tests: Myth vs. Reality SAT Subject Tests: Myth vs. Reality

Top 100 – Lowest Acceptance Rates

Top Students, Too, Aren’t Always Ready for College

College Planning for Gifted Students (pdf)

College Planning for Gifted and Talented Youth

How Can I Help My Gifted Child Plan for College?

Postsecondary Planning for Gifted and Talented Adolescents and Young Adults (pdf)

Planning a Gifted Child’s Future

Early Entrance College Programs

PA: Getting Them TherePA: Getting Them There

Elite Colleges Struggle To Recruit Smart, Low-Income Kids

Cybraryman’s College Information Page

 

Picture courtesy of Pixabay    CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Identity Development in Intellectually Gifted Students

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The importance of identity development for intellectually gifted students has been known for decades; however, its relevance has been questioned as often as the notion of giftedness itself. Links provided during the chat and additional resources subsequently added by the moderator below cover a 30+ year period through a recent study published this month.

What exactly is identity development and why is it important for gifted individuals? According to Psychologist Andrew Mahoney, “Identity formation is the process of integrating and shaping discrete pieces of self into a unique being.” Briefly stated, it is you defining who you are; not someone else.

In order to define oneself with regards to giftedness, a thorough understanding of being gifted itself is needed. In there lies the first challenge – the many definitions of ‘gifted’. #gtchat Advisor, Lisa Van Gemert, shared her recent post on the gifted label which was highly relevant to our conversation.

Gifted children do not always understand what it means to be gifted and this leads to unnecessary confusion. At times they may be told how smart they are and this seems like a good thing. Then, they may be teased and bullied; being called derogatory names such as “nerd” or “geek” which lead to feelings of being different and resentment by age-peers. Adults need to communicate openly and honestly about giftedness; especially that it’s not about being better than others.

It has been well documented that many gifted children form protective masks to hide their giftedness and to ‘fit in’ with age-peers. A gifted child’s awareness of others’ opinion of them can shape their behavior and response to perceived expectations. Acceptance and belonging are real human desires; gifted children may form masks when these needs aren’t met. As #gtchat Advisor and GT Coordinator in Texas Nicole Shannon stated, “They are afraid of being ridiculed for being who they are at their core.”

Asynchronous development in gifted children can also hinder identity development. It supposes being many ages at once and can make for socially awkward situations. Maturity levels can be significantly different from age-peers and misunderstandings may ensue. TED-Ed Innovative Educator in Virginia, Dani Bostick, related,  “When motor skills lag, some kids don’t feel smart. If they struggle with speech or writing, their ideas are trapped inside at times.”

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Are there risks involved if a gifted child doesn’t develop a gifted identity? When gifted children don’t develop a gifted identity, they can be at risk for impostor syndrome; academic failure. Not understanding who they are; feeling different – may lead to depression and social anxiety.

Parents and teachers can help gifted children develop their identity. They need to have a strong understanding or what giftedness is and is not. Gifted children need guidance about individual needs related to their giftedness from parents and ‘trained’ school counselors.  A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 13.00 NZST/11.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

The Gifted Identity Formation Model

Can You Hear the Flowers Sing? Issues for Gifted Adults

Counseling Issues with Recognized and Unrecognized Gifted Adults

What We Have Learned About Gifted Children

Recognizing Giftedness: Defining High Ability in Young Children (pdf)

Discovering the Gifted Ex-Child (Tolan)

Editing Away My Value

Center for Identity Potential

Psychological Perspectives on Gifted Education – Selected Problems (pdf)

Ostracism among Gifted Adolescents: A Preliminary Study in Turkey (pdf)

The “Me” Behind the Mask: Intellectually Gifted Students and the Search for Identity

An Argument for Proactive Attention to Affective Concerns of Adolescents (pdf)

Giftedness: The View from Within

Coping Through Awareness: A Transformational Tool for Coping with Being Highly Gifted

Gifted Identity (website)

How Can You Help Your Gifted Child – Super Mommy, Not (video 2:57)

In Search of The Gifted Identity (pdf)

8 Reasons You Should Label Kids as Gifted

The Mad Genius Stereotype: Still Alive and Well

Intelligence, Personality, and Interests: Evidence for Overlapping Traits (pdf)

Is Giftedness A Matter Of Justice? Explaining Implicit Attitudes of Student Teachers Towards Giftedness Using A Social Justice Framework

The Impact of Giftedness on Psychological Well-Being

Nerds and Geeks: Society’s Evolving Stereotypes of Our Students With Gifts & Talents (pdf)

Editorial: The Public and Professional Perception of the Social and Emotional Status of Gifted Children (1990 pdf)

The Gifted Kids’ Survival Guide: For Ages 10 & Under (Amazon)

Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students: Helping Kids Cope with Explosive Feelings (Amazon)

The Pursuit of Excellence or the Search for Intimacy? The Forced-Choice Dilemma of Gifted Youth

Searching for Meaning: Idealism, Bright Minds, Disillusionment, and Hope (Amazon)

When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social and Emotional Needs (Amazon) https://goo.gl/J6gwGC

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Public Domain 

Cyril Joad Photo courtesy of National Portrait Gallery, London  CC License

Exceptionally Gifted Children by Miraca U. M. Gross

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Gifted Role Models in Literature and Film

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Gifted kids derive many benefits from reading books and watching films with gifted characters. Positive gifted role models in books and movies show gifted kids they are not alone; that there are others like them. These role models can help kids to learn how to appropriately interact socially with age-peers and adults. How characters are portrayed is a powerful way of influencing the views of younger readers and film goers; and can positively impact their lives.

Today there are many places where one can find books and films with gifted characters for gifted students  and children. Websites and blogs have become rich resources for book lists for above-level readers.There are book publishers who specialize in books about and for gifted students and children.  Films with gifted characters can be chosen (subjectively) via movie data bases.

Current books recommended for gifted kids by our chat participants included Artemis Fowl, Harry Potter, Magic Tree House, Surviving the Applewhites, A Wrinkle in Time, Chronicles of Narnia, Archibald Frisby, and Tuck Everlasting.  Other included Divergence, Hunger Games, Maze Runner, The View From Saturday, The Mysterious Benedict Society, The UnWanteds, Half Magic, Franny K. Stein, Percy Jackson, The Giver, Ender’s Game, and Harriet the Spy.

Recent movies recommended by our chat participants for gifted kids included the Harry Potter series, Big Hero 6, The Imitation Game, How to Train Your Dragon, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Queen of Katwe, Little Man Tate, Searching for Bobby Fischer, October Sky, Apollo 13, August Rush, Kim Possible, and Inside Out. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify. Please see the links below for more suggestions.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 13.00 NZST/11.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Book Lists for Gifted Learners

Film Discussion Series at Gifted Resources

Gifted Kids, Gifted Characters and Great Books

Amadeus to Young Einstein: Modern Cinema & Its Portrayal of Gifted Learners (pdf )

Kubo and the Two Strings

6 Books Series About Gifted Children

Movies Featuring Gifted Kids (and Adults!)

Good Books for Verbally Talented Learners (pdf)

Fostering the Social & Emotional Development of Gifted Children through Guided Viewing Of Film

The Movie about NASA’s Black Female Scientists That’s Been A Long Time Coming

Publishers Specializing in the Gifted

Top Ten Books for Gifted Children

Recommended Books for Talented Readers (pdf)

Movies with Gifted Characters (pdf)

25 of Our Favorite Gifted Kids Movies

Guiding the Gifted Reader

Bibliotherapy with Gifted Students

Using Books to Heal & Enthuse Gifted Students

The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales

Some of My Best Friends Are Books: Guiding Gifted Readers (3rd Edition) (Amazon)

Supporting Gifted Children through Bibliotherapy

Books for Gifted Children with Gifted Characters & Themes

Cybraryman’s Teaching with Movies Page

Gifted Homeschoolers Blog Hop: Gifted in Reel Life

Hoagies’ Blog Hop: Gifted in Pop Culture

 

Image courtesy of Vimeo    CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

 

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