Strategies for Coping with Impostor Syndrome

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What is Impostor Syndrome? It’s feeling like you’re going to be found out that you are a fraud. You can never accept or enjoy success or accomplishment. Impostor Syndrome is at the crux of social anxiety; always feeling inadequate. “At university, impostors realize that there are many exceptional people; their own talents and abilities are not atypical. Often dismiss own talents; conclude they’re stupid when not the very best.” (Clance, 1985)

“Impostor Syndrome is when you are (mistakenly) sure that soon it will be obvious to all that you do not really belong in the gifted group.” ~ Jo Freitag, Coordinator – Gifted Resources, Victoria, Australia

Impostor Syndrome can manifest in many different ways such as perfectionism, the person who doesn’t ask for help (go it alone), or setting oneself up as an expert. Impostors can be workaholics (if they just work hard enough, they’ll succeed) or the profoundly gifted (setting the bar even higher).

Those dealing with Impostor Syndrome experience a negative impact on their psychological well-being. Burnout, emotional exhaustion, loss of intrinsic motivation, poor achievement, including guilt and shame about success are reinforced by the Impostor Cycle (Chrisman et al., 1995).

“I see a lot of the self-deprecating imposters. People that talk down about themselves to beat you to it.” ~ Kate Faulkner, Intervention and Enrichment Coordinator for Elementary Science in Sugar Land, TX.

How can family dynamics affect Impostor Syndrome? Family messages about the importance of being naturally intelligent are assumed to influence ambitions and expectations of Impostors from early childhood. (Clance ’85) Impostors have a strong need to please (Bussotti,‘90); may cause children to alter their behavior to prevent loss of affection from parents (Clance,‘85).

“Giftedness manifests in many ways. Some siblings’ gifts fit the academic paradigm, while others’ gifts may go unrecognized.” Jeffrey Farley,M.Ed.,  Principal of Odom Academy, Beaumont ISD, TX.

Perfectionism is a trait that is believed to have a marked impact on the development and maintenance of impostor fears. Impostors set “excessively high, unrealistic goals & then experience self-defeating thoughts and behaviors when they can’t reach those goals” (Kets de Vries, ’05).

There are coping strategies that can be used to overcome Impostor Syndrome. Realize you’re not alone. Many experience Impostor Syndrome; few talk about it. Consider a mentor. If you or someone you know feel overcome by Impostor Syndrome, seek professional help. A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2 PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

The Five Types of Impostor Syndrome and How to Beat Them

Feeling like an Impostor? You Can Escape this Confidence-Sapping Syndrome

Is Imposter Syndrome a Sign of Greatness?

The Impostor Phenomenon (pdf)

The Dangers of Feeling Like a Fake

You’re Not Fooling Anyone

The Impostor Phenomenon: Differential Effects of Parenting and the Big-Five Personality Traits (pdf)

7 Coping Strategies to Overcome Impostor Syndrome

The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women: Why Capable People Suffer from the Impostor Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It (Amazon)

Beating the Impostor Syndrome (Amazon)

The Curious Case of Impostor Syndrome

What Is Impostor Syndrome?

Sprite’s Site: Gifted Island – Testing, testing …

Sprite’s Site: Pleading the Pink Slipper

7 Ways Teachers Can Push Past Imposter Syndrome

Impostor Syndrome.com

Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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Understanding the Gifted Introvert

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A simple explanation of introversion is ‘choosing solitude above socializing’. Introverts are keen observers, innovators, fiercely loyal, and empathetic. They possess many qualities associated with giftedness and don’t conform to societal norms; preferring to make their own rules as do those thought of as gifted.

Introverts appreciate a simpler life; planning and reflecting on new ways of doing things. They encourage others to develop self-reflection and think before acting. (Jung) Introverts seek depth and intimacy in relationships often leading to longer lasting and meaningful connections.

What are some of the myths about introverts? It’s a myth that introversion and shyness are the same thing. One is a choice; the other is not. To think it’s all or nothing is also a myth. According to Francesca Gino, “Personality traits, like introversion and extroversion, exist along a continuum.”

What are the downsides to believing in the extrovert/introvert dichotomy? It “traps us in stereotypes that affect how we interact with others. If you self-identify with one personality type, you risk ignoring behaviors or needs you may have.” (Gino)

Adults can help an introverted gifted child to better adapt to social situations. If a gifted child struggles with introversion; take a deep dive into what it is and is not. If they don’t feel it’s an issue; leave them alone. Adults can also provide gifted kids with strategies to adapt their introversion to their surroundings. Teachers, too, can make the gifted classroom a sanctuary for their introverted gifted students. (Byrd) A transcript may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Introversion: The Often Forgotten Factor Impacting the Gifted

The Top 10 Myths about Introverts

How Parents Can Help Introverts Thrive

Why Socializing Drains Introverts More Than Extroverts

Introvert or Extrovert? Here’s Another Way to Think about Your Personality

Popularity, Similarity, and the Network Extraversion Bias (pdf)

Teaching Introverts Is Different

Spending Time Alone Might Be the Best Way to Rest, According to Science

Introverts Don’t Hate People, They Hate Shallow Socializing

7 Reasons to Be Proud to Be an Introvert

People Love To Identify As “Introverts” But What Does That Term Actually Mean?

Embracing Introversion: Ways to Stimulate Reserved Students in the Classroom

10 Illustrations that Sum Up What Life is like for Introverts

The Secret Lives of Introverts: Inside Our Hidden World (Amazon)

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking (Amazon)

Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed & How We Can Stick to the Plan

Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed and How We Can Stick to the Plan (Amazon)

Hiding in the Bathroom: An Introvert’s Roadmap to Getting Out There (Amazon)

Cybraryman’s Introverted Children Page

The Gifted Introvert (#gtchat)

The Gifted Introvert (2002)

After the Show: The Many Faces of the Performer (SB Kaufman)

“Make Your Class Cozy for Gifted Introverts”  (Ian Byrd)

Live Your Life from the Front Seat: Accomplish Magnificent Things in Your Life, Relationships and Career (Amazon)

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

From Tweens to Teens – Making the Transition

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Asynchronous development plays a role in age-peer relations for gifted tweens and teens. Middle school is often a time for making new friends and testing boundaries. Maturity levels greatly affect age-peer relations. Gifted high school students may approach relationships in an adult manner before they’re ready.

Family dynamics also plays a major role in the transition from tween to teen. Parents need to recognize peer influence and provide opportunities for gifted kids to socialize outside of school. Understand that gifted tweens and teens are under more stress to achieve and to compete during the middle school and high school years.

Should gifted services be ‘subject to change’ once students leave elementary school? Giftedness does not begin in 2nd grade & end in 6th; it continues across the lifespan. Gifted services are even more important as gifted students enter middle and high school. They need MORE support; not less.

What should gifted education look like in middle school and high school? Cooperative learning stressed in general education can have inherent limitations for gifted students and exacerbate anxiety for them. Flexible grouping based on ability should be considered as students enter secondary education; pair students with intellectual peers.

Schools have a responsibility to provide guidance to gifted students facing social-emotional issues during the middle to high school transition. The general school population may have very different social-emotional needs at these ages; all should be served. Failure to meet social-emotional needs of middle and high school gifted students in transition can lead to major societal issues later on.

Adults can inspire gifted tweens and teens to develop their gifts and talents. Parents and professionals can serve as role models for gifted tweens and teens. Adults can participate as mentors and career counselors for gifted students as they explore passions and ways to utilize talents. A transcript may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/Midnight UK to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Educating Gifted Students in Middle School, 2nd Ed: A Practical Guide (Amazon)

Keepin’ It Real as a 2e Parent

Back Off, Mom & Dad! Fostering Independence in Middle Schoolers

Disorganized Student: Organizing Tips for Middle Schoolers

Parenting Middle Schoolers: 6 Things that Worked for Me

Status of High School Gifted Programs 2013 (pdf)

Gifted (the Movie) Discussion Guide (pdf)

The Handbook of Secondary Gifted Education 2005 (Amazon)

The Efficacy of AP Programs for Gifted Students

How to Raise a Smarter Child, According to Parents of Gifted Kids

Mentoring Gifted Children: It Takes a Village

7 Tips for Parenting Tweens and Teens

Show and Tell – Preparing Gifted Tweens and Teens for the Future

Sprite’s Site: Do you grow out of giftedness?

Cybraryman’s Asynchronous Development Page

Sprite’s Site: Talkfest

Teen Learning Lab

Cybraryman’s Social and Emotional Learning Page

Empathy: Healing the Awkward Heart

Cybraryman’s The Brain and Brain Games Page

What to Say When Other People Interfere with Your Parenting

Photo courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Beyond Honors & AP: How can we best serve secondary G/T students?

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Meeting the needs of gifted and talented students in middle and high school is often a subject approached very differently by those in general education and gifted advocates. This week at #gtchat we discussed how to best meet the needs of these students with Colin E. Seale of thinkLaw. Joining Colin, was Sarah Pfeiler, Curriculum and Training Manager at thinkLaw.

Honors Colin Bio

So many gifted and talented kids breeze through elementary school and lack of challenge leaves them ill-prepared for middle and high school. These identified students face many teachers who lack professional development and knowledge of what the ‘gifted’ label entails, or  have inappropriate expectations. Twice exceptional students may face the biggest challenge when schools see only deficits and fail to support strengths.

Gifted and talented students often struggle when there is no “right” answer. Educators must learn how to channel perfectionism into positive action; involve student voice and choice in relation to passions. They should share with the student what perfectionism is and is not.

Most gifted students are pulling rather than being pushed when it comes to technology in school. Allowing them to create their own tech is a great incentive; for example; learn coding as a second language.

Today’s high students will have careers in fields that do not yet exist. Future prospects should be partnered with passions and mentorships. Gifted students are often the visionaries! They can be supported by providing opportunities to explore personal choices in their education.

Gifted and talented students go to college and are ‘big fish’ in a ‘bigger pond.’ How do you prepare them for the transition out of high school?  GT students who are challenged in high school are better prepared for the transition to higher education. Educators should provide opportunities to begin the transition when ready via Early College, Dual Enrollment, and Early Out.

How do you help gifted and talented students to broaden their perspective of success beyond GPA, SAT, and ACT scores? They know the score. Offer new ways to learn: PBL, Genius Hour, Design Thinking, and mentorships. Expose them to testing early so it becomes routine. Begin thinking about college and beyond earlier than age-peers.

With appropriate professional development and open minds, educators will be prepared to best serve gifted and talented students. A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

TAGT Summit: Serving Secondary G/T Students

Canon City Schools (CO): Transitions & Portability

Accommodating the Social Emotional Needs of Secondary Gifted/Learning Disabled Students

Perfectionism A Practical Guide to Managing “Never Good Enough”

Helpful Tips for Parents of Perfectionistic Gifted Learners

Using Technology to Engage GT Students

Using Technology in Gifted & Talented Education Classrooms: Teachers’ Perspective pdf)

How Can We Prepare Kids For Jobs That Don’t Exist Yet?

A Field Guide to ‘jobs that don’t exist yet’

11 Really Cool Jobs that Don’t Exist Today but Will Soon

The Efficacy of AP Programs for Gifted Students

5 Summer Activities for Gifted and Talented Students

Ten Essential Tips to Help your Gifted Teen Plan for College

thinkLaw: Sample Lesson Download

thinkLaw: Critical Thinking Webinar

Empathy: Healing the Awkward Heart (video 5:49)

Cybraryman’s Empathy Page

Cybraryman’s Study Skills/Organization Page

Perfectionism and Gifted Students (YouTube 1:04:31)

Failing Fabulously: 3 Ways Re-framing Mistakes Builds Critical Thinking (Video  5:43)

Cybraryman’s Social and Emotional Learning Page

BBC: Make a One Minute Movie

Cybraryman’s Critical Thinking Page

Hoagies’ Gifted: Perfectionism and the Gifted Child

Wonderopolis (YouTube 4:20)

Awkward Silences: 3 Ways Wait Time Enhances Critical Thinking (Video 6:17)

Cybraryman’s The 4 C’s+ Page

Cybraryman’s Soft Skills Page

6 Tips for Helping Your High-Schooler Learn to Self-Advocate

Cool Colleges: For the Hyper-Intelligent, Self-Directed, Late Blooming, and Just Plain Different, 2nd Ed. (Amazon)

James and Susie (YouTube 5:15)

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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