Category Archives: Social Media

Role of Technology in Gifted Education

Last week during chat, we discussed cluster grouping of gifted students. Although a strategy to be considered, technology can be a better option for GT students to explore passions and work at their own pace. It is a natural fit for GT students working in STEM areas who are conducting research or working with mentors at an early age. Emerging technologies such as VR, Augmented Reality, and AI are all appealing to GT students and they are capable of utilizing the tech to their advantage.

Tech can be used to connect GT students on social networks such as Twitter to give and receive authentic feedback to their work. It expands their audience to a global level in many cases. GT students can use online resources for independent, self-directed learning; research; and access to highered online courses.

Special populations within the gifted community often struggle to form and maintain relationships with age-peers. Online opportunities can put them in contact with intellectual peers. Technology resources, especially for low-SES and rural students, need to be available not only during school hours; but, also after-school and during school breaks as well.

Asynchronous development can be a factor for younger GT students who may be drawn into groups of older students who may be intellectual peers, but much more mature. Parental and teacher guidance should be utilized. Memory construction (and recall) and sustaining attentive focus is a concern for some twice-exceptional students. Adult supervision may be required by parents, teachers or support staff to ensure optimal learning occurs. In recent years, online bullying of GT students has steadily increased. Before beginning networking, students should understand the importance of reporting of any incidences to an adult.

Accommodating a wide range of abilities in a single classroom can be nearly impossible for any teacher. Technology can be a great asset in differentiating curriculum, tiering assignments, and scaffolding learning. It can enhance learning experiences by providing educators with high quality, ongoing professional development; something that was nonexistent just a few years ago. It’s important to remember that technology is a tool and not be considered a learning outcome. It should raise awareness; provide answers to questions; and avenues to finding new questions to ask.

Is online learning a viable alternative to traditional classrooms for GT students? Yes and no. There are certainly excellent online learning experiences available. Many resources have been the result of meeting the demands of gifted homeschoolers and GT students isolated in rural school districts. Although many GT students excel in online environments, others report preferring to interact with peers and teachers face-to-face in the classroom whenever possible.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Challenging Gifted Students in the General Education Classroom (pdf)

How to Put the Six Blended Learning Models into Action

Differentiating Technology for Gifted Learners

Technology in Gifted Education: A Review of Best Practices and Empirical Research (pdf)

Using Technology in Gifted and Talented Education Classrooms: The Teachers’ Perspective (pdf)

Computer Technology for the Gifted and Talented Child! (pdf)

Technology in Gifted Education: Annotated Bibliography

The Role of Technology in Gifted and Talented Education

6 Must Have Apps, Tools, and Resources for Gifted Children (2017)

Effects of Technology on Gifted Children

Using Technology with Gifted Students

3 Ways Technology Can Help You Support Gifted Students

How to Identify, Understand and Teach Gifted Children

Teaching Strategies for Gifted Students

Students that Are Gifted Need to Be Challenged

For Frustrated Gifted Students, Distance Learning Offers a World of Opportunities

5 Activities to Try in Your Gifted and Talented Classroom

The Neglected Readers: Differentiating Instruction for Academically Gifted and Talented Learners (pdf)

Factors That Promote/Inhibit Teaching Gifted Students in a Regular Class: Results from a Professional Development Program for Chemistry Teachers

Simple Truth: Technology Changes. The Skills We Believe in Don’t.

In Celebration of Teaching Geeks!

Cybraryman’s Technology Page

Cybraryman’s Technology Integration Page

The Impact of Student-Created Apps

Leveraging Technology to Empower Student Voice, Ease Anxiety, and Create Compassionate Classrooms (Book)

Skype in the Classroom

ePals

Cybraryman’s Connected Educators/Students Page

Technology and the Gifted Child

Storybird

Assistive Technology for the 2e Learner

Meeting the Needs of Gifted and Talented Students through Technology Supported Distance Teaching

2e Students: Who They Are and What They Need

Medieval Helpdesk (with English subtitles) (YouTube 2:44)

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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Connecting the Gifted Community on Social Media

 

What are some positive ways to connect with the gifted community on social media? Take time to help new members on a platform – recommend people to follow on Twitter and welcome new group members on Facebook. Be sure you understand the intent of a tweet before responding. When you respond to tweets, be thoughtful, meaningful, and respectful. Share and retweet good news about the GT community, your students, and your child’s school/GT program.

Social networking has an effect on the way children are educated both at school and outside of it. There are both negative and positive effects to social media use by GT students. Although a way of life for most, some of these students are more at ease with face-to-face interaction. Adults need to be cognizant of individual needs. Isolation due to geography or contact with intellectual peers is a real concern for many GT students and social media can bridge the gap by bringing students together online.

How do we leverage social media as a pedagogical tool in the GT classroom? Teachers and admins can share information/success stories quickly on platforms like Twitter. Twitter is a great way to stay in touch with busy parents by using a dedicated hashtag. Twitter is a great platform for providing global feedback to students on their projects/assignments, for students to ask questions of experts, and to showcase student work on a broader stage. Facebook is constantly updating tools for student use including dedicated class pages, ways to post about upcoming events, and Facebook Live for broadcasting. Class blogs provide students a platform on which to share and archive for future use writing assignments with the ability to receive assessment and feedback through a comment section.

Integrating social media into school culture can become a powerful tool for connecting with faculty, parents, and the local community in real time in ways that were not available in the past. School admins can share school news on social networks, hold online meetings with parents, and provide professional development on gifted education for faculty and staff.

Social media platforms can provide useful networking for students seeking jobs/internships; finding mentors; collaborating on international projects; promoting personal/school success stories. They are already an intricate part of students’ lives outside of school. Connecting students with intellectual peers beyond their local schools is a logical step in creating community.

Meeting in real life can act as a validation of friendships and professional relationships begun online. It can enable further collaboration on community building by extending existing personal and professional networks. Within the gifted community, conferences are an important way of connecting with people you meet online. Tweetups can provide social context to relationships and serve to create a sense of community. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Connecting the Gifted Community

How Social Media is Reshaping Today’s Education System

22 Ways to Use Social Media in Your Classroom

Connecting with Faraway Teachers Via Social Media

Using Social Media to Be a Better Education Leader with Top Tweeting Principal Eric Sheninger

The Ups and Downs of Social Media

Contribution of Social Media to the Students’ Academic Development

10 Examples of the Positive Impact of Social Media

10 Ways to Use Twitter in Teaching

[Social Media] Staying Connected with Educator Network Twitter Chats

SENG Conference 2019

TAGT #giftED19 Conference

Cybraryman’s Social Media and Social Networking Page

Social Media Usage Motivations of Gifted Children

How to Provide High Aptitude Learners with Social and Emotional Supports

The Hottest Chat App for Teens Is … Google Docs

NAGC: Professional Learning

Global Education Conference

Image courtesy of Pixabay   Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

The G Word Film

 

This week, Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT welcomed Director/Producer Marc Smolowitz, Producer Ron Turiello and Danielle Holke to discuss their new film The G Word which seeks to answer the question, “Who gets to be ‘Gifted’ in America and why?”

The factors used to decide who is ‘gifted’ in America today are much the same as they have been for decades; factors shrouded in myths and prejudices that need to be exposed and corrected. In recent years, new research on neurodiversity and intelligence are expanding our perceptions on what giftedness entails. This information needs to inform policy decisions.

Where are some of the unlikely places ‘gifted’ people can be found? As our friends at the National Association for Gifted Children have said – there are no boundaries to giftedness. It crosses all economic, cultural, & gender identity sectors of our society. Gifted people are found at Ivy League schools as well as in prisons. They can be the superintendent or janitor at your child’s school.

“Failure for gifted people to thrive can come from a life of feeling out of sync, feeling like a misfit, and knowing one is an outlier. When one’s giftedness, quirks and all, are embraced and nurtured, giftedness thrives.” ~ Celi Trepanier, M.Ed.

Some ‘gifted’ people thrive while others don’t. Lack of early identification and misdiagnosis can place a child on the wrong path at the very beginning of their school careers. Perhaps surprising to some, where they live can affect availability of services. Rural schools with few identified GT students do not see gifted education as a priority when resources are limited.

“GT students often are singled out, ostracized, endure bullying because they learn, speak, focus, etc. differently than the norm in the general ed classroom. That may originate from peers, but it also may originate from teachers. It’s a painful experience kids can’t escape.” ~ Margaret Thomas

Many special education programs are unequipped to teach twice-exceptional students. In the past, too many decision/policy makers saw the disability before ability and the child as someone who needed to be fixed rather than support abilities. Lack of professional development in the area of twice-exceptionality has allowed myths to flourish that hinder the exceptional.

“I truly believe that twice-exceptional is the savior of gifted in the 2020s. Our nation is so focused on deficits this has allowed gifted to have a seat of the table again in ways it hasn’t in many years” ~ Marc Smolowitz

What are the risks of maintaining the status quo in gifted education for our society? If society continues to settle for the status quo, we fail our brightest children … their ability to succeed in life. Status quo is just that … stagnation … and society as a whole also loses the opportunity to progress. GT kids aren’t obligated to help society at large, but their contributions can make a difference.

There are many challenges which face gifted education in the next decade. Only 6 states in the U.S. actively support gifted education. Advocacy must be at the forefront. Including coursework in gifted education at the undergraduate level is imperative to cultivating new leadership, high quality research, and maintaining funding. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

We at #gtchat offer our congratulations to The G Word film, Marc Smolowitz, Ron Turiello and their entire crew for the completion of a successful Kickstarter in support of production of the film!

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Mind Matters Podcast: The G Word Film with guest, Marc Smolowitz (39:04)

Meet the Experts | Who Gets to be Gifted in America and Why? (Vimeo 12:13)

EXCEPTIONAL MINDS | A Story from the Forthcoming Documentary THE G WORD (Vimeo 8:31)

THE G WORD | 1st Promo (Vimeo 6:01)

Colin Seale On Being An Exception To The Rule (Vimeo 1:14)

Dr. Joseph S. Renzulli Discusses The Schoolwide Enrichment Model (Vimeo 1:00)

Producer Ron Turiello Explains What’s So Important About THE G WORD (Vimeo 2:04)

Thoughtleaders and Experts Featured in THE G WORD (Vimeo :59)

ZIP CODE 85349 (San Luis, Arizona) (Vimeo 8:00)

My Family Still Calls Me Gabby (Vimeo 6:49)

Gifted Support Group: Hidden Challenges for Gifted and 2E Students (YouTube 26:22)

What is the Excellence Gap?

Equal Talents, Unequal Opportunities: A Report Card on State Support for Academically Talented Low-Income Students

Black Intelligence (Vimeo 8:36)

Filmmaker Explores Giftedness at FDL Ojibwe School

NAGC: Giftedness Knows No Boundaries

An Independent Filmmaker Highlights Gifted Students of San Luis

Bill to End Ban on Pell Grants for Prisoners Gains Traction

Rural Communities Test Ways to Hook Gifted Students

Why Egalitarian Societies Need Gifted Education (YouTube 59:17)

The G Word Highlights NSD HiCap Program

Gifted Children and Adults: Neglected Areas of Practice (pdf)

Image courtesy of The G Word film

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Twitter Tips for GT Teachers

gtchat 08162018 Tips

Twitter chats are a great way for GT teachers to grow their Personal Learning Network and avail themselves of free professional development on a weekly basis. It’s advisable to follow along with a chat you’d like to join for a few weeks before tweeting. This way you can learn how a particular chat progresses; such as how many and when questions are asked. Do not set your Twitter account to ‘private’ if you want to join a Twitter chat. Only your followers will see your tweets. If you’re a teacher concerned about privacy, set up a separate account for chats.

It’s easier than you think to participate in a Twitter chat. During your first chat, consider simply introducing yourself. AND don’t forget to add the hashtag is you aren’t using a platform that adds it for you!

Virtually all gifted organizations now have a presence on Twitter. The easiest way to find them is to simply do a search on Twitter. Types of organizations include national and state organizations, homeschool organizations, specialized schools and programs, and those providing social emotional support.

We asked participants what was one thing they know now that they wish they had known when they started on Twitter: ” Don’t follow every account that follows you just to increase your number of followers. Follow back accounts that tweet about your interests. You’ll be happy in the future as the numbers grow.” “Twitter is an excellent place to network and to connect with experts. Participating in chats can put you in touch with like-minded colleagues; something often missing in real life situations.”

It’s important to understand the importance of the hashtag, its purpose and how to use it. Look for existing hashtags; they are how Twitter is indexed. Don’t make up hashtags just to emphasize a topic or idea. CAPS work for that.

How can GT teachers use #gtchat to their advantage beyond simply chatting? Many teachers don’t initially realize that #gtchat is available 24/7 to connect with others in gifted education and the gifted community in general … Connect with teachers, academics, psychologists, organizations and authors. #gtchat provides a transcript on @Wakelet, a weekly blog post with a summary of the chat and resources, FB and Pinterest page, and YouTube channel. You can follow @gtchatmod for the latest news and info on the chat.

GT teachers can also utilize Twitter in the classroom. For example, they can connect classrooms online via Twitter to practice Twitter etiquette, share information, and to learn about other cultures in the global community. It’s also a great way to practice a foreign language and to conduct research. Teachers and students can engage with other classrooms to work collaboratively on projects, have a book study, host an author, connect with experts, host a Twitter chat, or seek out feedback on written assignments.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet. After checking out the transcript, you can see more resources from the chat below.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

100 Twitter Tips for Teachers (2016)

25 Twitter Bio Tips for Teachers (2017)

Twitter for Educators (Dec 2017)

Facilitating a Class Twitter Chat

It’s All about the Hashtag! 50+ Popular Hashtags for Educators

TeachersFirst’s Twitter for Teachers Resources

All about Hashtags and Twitter Chats

Twitter Teacher Tips (with Handout)

Cheat Sheet: Twitter for Teachers (updated August 2017)

Cybraryman’s Twitter Resource Pages

10 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom

Free Twitter Tips for Teachers

Cybraryman’s Twitter Chats Pages

Sprite’s Site: The Twitter Stream

On an e-Journey with Generation Y: Twitter

Image courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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