Category Archives: Critical Thinking

Embracing Multipotentiality in Gifted Students

gtchat 10112018 Multipotential

The textbook definition of multipotentiality is: an educational/psychological term referring to the ability and preference, particularly of strong intellectual or artistic curiosity; to excel in 2 or more different fields. A multipotentialite does not need to be an expert in any one field and may like to study diverse subjects. They are often referred to as a Jack-of-all-trades or Renaissance person.

Being a multipotentialite means having the potential to pursue many different passions and   be successful at many or all of them. They have a wide variety of career choices and the ability change from one to another if they wish.

Is there a downside to multipotentiality? A multipotentialite often finds it difficult to choose a single career or when they do; stick with it. Often they are never challenged until college when studies become difficult. It can lead to high stress levels, overscheduling, confusion and depression.

One can embrace their own multipotentiality by seeking inspiration from peers and  from mentors who can help a multipotentialite focus on their passions. Investigation, researching ideas, and trying things out can all help a multipotentialite gain a career focus.

How can parents guide their child’s response to being a multipotentialite? They can expose children throughout their lives to opportunities to work with peers, mentors and professionals. Parents can tune into their child’s passions and look for ways to help them explore ideas and potential careers.

Multipotentialites should embrace the philosophy of ‘variety is the spice of life’; it is no longer necessary to remain in a single career throughout one’s life. It’s acceptable to hold multiple part-time positions that blend passions. They should remain adaptable and be ready to change course when opportunities arise. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 1 PM NZDT/11 AM AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Refuse to be Boxed In: Embrace Your Multipotentiality

From Identification to Ivy League: Nurturing Multiple Interests and Multi-Potentiality in Gifted Students

Career Counseling for Gifted Students: Literature Review & Critique (pdf)

Multipotentiality Among the Intellectually Gifted: “It Was Never There and Already It’s Vanishing” (pdf)

Gifted Adrift? Career Counseling of the Gifted and Talented

A World of Possibilities: Career Development for Gifted Students

If You Still Don’t Believe You’re Gifted

Multipotentiality: Are You Overwhelmed By Your Too Muchness?

Let’s Get Real about Gifted Kids

What is a Multi-Potential?

Identity, Purpose, and Happiness: Helping High-Achieving Adolescents Find All Three

Counseling Concerns of Gifted and Talented Adolescents: Implications for School Counselors

Multipotentiality: When High Ability Leads to Too Many Options

When I Grow Up: Multipotentiality and Gifted Youth

Good at Too Many Things?

Cybraryman’s Multipotentiality Page

Multipotentiality Resources

Multipotentiality: When High Ability Leads to Too Many Options

Multipotentiality – Do You Have Too Many Tabs Open?

Image courtesy of Flickr  CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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Building Intentional Leadership in Gifted Learners

gtchat 10042018 Leadership

 

This week, our guest at #gtchat was Dr. Mary Christopher, Professor of Educational Studies and Gifted Education at Hardin-Simmons University and Program Director: Doctorate in Leadership. Dr. Christopher is a Past-President of TAGT and also does consulting in gifted education and leadership. She is the co-author of Leadership for Kids: Curriculum for Building Intentional Leadership in Gifted Learners from Prufrock Press.

The definition of leadership has been evolving in recent years. It now includes the ability to expect the unexpected and adapt quickly to change. Leaders today are seen as innovators and producers rather than simply consumers of someone else’s information or product. According to Robert Sternberg, gifted leaders possess creativity, intelligence and wisdom.

“Since the Marland Report, experts included leadership in definitions of giftedness and viewed leadership as integral to giftedness, but leadership remains the least served domain of giftedness. Gifted leaders may not be served within the gifted program.” ~ Dr. Mary Christopher

It is important for GT students to learn about leadership. Depending on their personal interests and goals, GT students often become future leaders and the quality of their leadership depends on understanding what makes a great (intentional) leader even better. Today more than ever, it’s important for GT students to see the value in moral and ethical behavior, clear communication with those they are working, motivating others through personal positive actions and providing inspiration.

“Gifted kids will often be ahead of the pack in some regard throughout their lives. Learning to achieve goals through teamwork whether they have formal authority or not is going to be crucial for a sense of satisfaction.” ~ Kate Arms

What characteristics, skills, and perspective of leadership are needed to become intentional leaders? Intentional leaders should be able to develop ideas to be studies, provide new solutions to existing problems, persuade others to assist in solving problems, and ensure implementation of those solutions. (Sternberg) They are willing to work with a diverse group of colleagues engaged in problem solving and seek to involve all stakeholders.

“It’s important that we balance students cognitive abilities with skills that allow them to be successful people in the world. It’s about challenging Ss to tap into the affective domain that will grow their capacity to bring positive change to society.” ~ Matt Cheek 

Educators can use many different strategies to incorporate leadership training into their curriculum. Students should be presented with opportunities for critical thinking, analysis and creative problem solving. For young gifted students, teachers can include biographies of great leaders in their LA curriculum to read and discuss.

Where can students find opportunities to develop leadership skills outside of the classroom? Finding mentors who are leaders in their community can help develop leadership skills and allow skills to develop naturally. Volunteering exposes students to opportunities to practice and model leadership skills while helping others.  Extracurricular activities can provide avenues for developing skills necessary to lead within group and team activities.

Below find curated resources from the chat and additional ones that can be used in and out of the classroom when teaching students about leadership. A transcript may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 1 PM NZDT/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Leadership for Kids: Curriculum for Building Intentional Leadership in Gifted Learners (Prufrock Press)

Does Your Gifted Kid Have Leadership Characteristics?

Developing Leadership Goals for Gifted Learners (PP – pdf)

Eight Great Ways to Develop Youth Leaders

Developing Leadership Skills in Young Gifted Students (pdf)

Dare to Care: Teaching Leadership to Gifted Students (pdf)

Leadership Education for Gifted and Talented Youth: A Review of the Literature (pdf)

Intelligences Outside the Normal Curve: Co-Cognitive Factors that Contribute to the Creation of Social Capital and Leadership Skills in Young People (pdf)

Early Development and Leadership: Building the Next Generation of Leaders (CRC Press)

TEMPO: What the Research Says about Leadership Development of Gifted Students (pdf)

TEMPO: Understanding and Encouraging Leadership Giftedness (pdf)

The Most Important Leadership Competencies, According to Leaders around the World

The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness (bn)

How Great Leaders Think: The Art of Reframing (bn)

Leadership for Students: A Guide for Young Leaders (Prufrock Press)

The O Factor: Identifying and Developing Students Gifted in Leadership Ability (Google Books)

Leadership Lessons with Raina Penchansky

Boundless Leadership: Leadership Hacks by Scott Stein – Book Review

Boundless Leadership: Now is the perfect time to take on a personal quest

Building Everyday Leadership in All Kids (Free Spirit Publishing)

Changing Tomorrow 1: Leadership Curriculum for High-Ability Elementary Students (Prufrock)

The Leader in Me Program

Co-Active Leadership: Five Ways to Lead (bn)

Photo courtesy of Dr. Mary Christopher.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Developing Teamwork Challenges for GT Students

gtchat 05172018 Adventures

This week, we welcomed Greg Laufer of Adventures in Learning located in El Paso, TX as our guest to chat about developing team work challenges for gifted and talented students.  Adventures in Learning provides services to both educators and gifted students with professional development, academic competitions and summer camps. Every year they host an academic competition called Team Quest – The Ultimate Academic Challenge.

Grouping strategies are most often used in full inclusion classrooms. For in class grouping, peer-grouping greatly benefits gifted students. Another popular strategy is flexible-grouping which may yield benefits by reducing misconceptions of elitism. Gifted and talented students report overwhelmingly preference for work with other intellectual peers for numerous reasons. They get frustrated when group members expect them to do a majority of the work.

“I have seen how grouping helps students learn, become better listeners, learn life skills, and understand their classmates and themselves. Grouping by ability and interest are important, BUT we all know life is not always so neat and tidy. Students will face MANY situations in life when they will not get to work with someone like them. They also need to see the value in how others think and do things.” ~ Greg Laufer

What are the benefits of fostering team building through group work for gifted students? They need to experience working on a team early on to understand how to interact with others and prepare for later academic challenges. Gifted students can benefit from the experience of working with multiple ability peers that mirror the society in which they will one day work and live.

“Probably the biggest benefit (of grouping) is helping GT students to see they do not have to deal with everything on their own. It is common for GT students to take on too much and place pressure on themselves. Grouping helps them to see it’s OK to reach out and ask for help. Differing perspectives is another reason we at Adventures in Learning love grouping students. Inside our academic competition (Team Quest) we see this every day.” ~ Greg Laufer

We can encourage gifted students to see the value of group work with respect to successful participation in the workforce. Parents can communicate their own participation in working in groups to their children and how it has made a difference in their work experience. Teachers and schools can provide opportunities for job-shadowing and career day programs during the school year.

“With a global economy that we see today, being able to communicate and work with others is more important than ever before. The days of sitting in a cubical for 8 hours and never talking to anyone are not as prevalent as they once were. Students must be TAUGHT teamwork. Companies today are learning that being a team player and someone having still to collaborate is SOOOOOO important! After if a job candidate can demonstrate the ability to work together, they have a better chance at getting the job over a more “qualified” person.” ~ Greg Laufer

One of the best ways to impress upon children the importance of anything is to model the behavior you want to see in them. Participating in community service and including them whenever possible sends a powerful message. Parents can provide opportunities for their children to be on a team during after-school and summer recess.

Our final question of the chat was for our guest Greg Laufer: How did Adventures in Learning begin conducting Academic Competitions? Greg started Adventures in Learning over 20 years ago. His longevity in the business speaks to its benefits for the gifted community.

“I started out 22 years ago when I was asked to assist a friend to present the “paper/pencil” portion of an academic competition. It was such a fun experience that I have turned it into my life’s work. Over the years I have worked with nearly 60,000 GT students in our program TEAM QUEST. The Team Quest Theme for next school year will be “Secrets of the Sea” We will be posting about our new program throughout the summer.” ~ Greg Laufer

A transcript may be find at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Adventures in Learning (El Paso)

Adventures in Learning: About Us

Team Quest The Ultimate Academic Challenge

Adventures in Learning University Workshops

Adventures in Learning Professional Development & Trainings

10 Team-Building Games That Promote Critical Thinking

Developing Critical Thinking and Creativity through Team Building in the Classroom

Elementary Matters: Team Building Activities

Gifted and Talented Center: LEGO Science and Engineering

Developing Leadership Skills in Young Gifted Students (pdf)

AUS: Tournament of Minds – Inquiry into the Education of Gifted and Talented Students (pdf)

12 Ways to Promote Teamwork, Creativity & Problem-Solving During the Summer (pdf)

Ability Grouping and Self-Esteem of Gifted Students

Adventures in Learning’s Summer Reading Program!

Team Quest: The Ultimate Academic Challenge

What Educators Need to Know About Gifted Students and Cooperative Learning (pdf)

Gifted Education and Cooperative Learning: A Miss or a Match? (pdf)

Gifted Students’ Perceptions of the Academic and Social/Emotional Effects of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Grouping (Abstract)

Cybraryman’s Collaboration Page

Cybraryman’s Connectivity Page

Guiding Gifted Collaboration

Image courtesy of Adventures in Learning.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Building Empathy Through Critical Thinking

gtchat 03082018 thinkLaw

This week, Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT welcomed Colin Seale and Sarah Pfeiler of the team from thinkLaw to chat about “Building Empathy Through Critical Thinking” on Twitter. thinkLaw helps teachers teach critical thinking  through legal cases. To learn how your gifted students can benefit from thinkLaw’s standards-aligned program that helps educators teach critical thinking  to all students, click this link to schedule a brief call.

Colin Seale

Colin E. Seale, Founder & CEO

 

Sarah Pfeiler

Sarah Pfeiler, Curriculum & Training Manager 

 

GT students often experience a significant lack of empathy from their teachers at very young ages. It can cause a lifetime of discouragement when they feel misunderstood and marginalized by adults. When teachers fail to understand what the label ‘gifted’ entails – more than academics; it can create an atmosphere in which GT students no longer feel they should be expected to show emotions that aren’t extended to them.

 

Empathy pic thinkLaw

 

Students need to understand what empathy is and ways to express it. By opening a dialog on what it is and isn’t, students gain a greater appreciation of its importance in their own lives. Introducing the idea that empathy can improve both the student’s life and the lives of those around them becomes challenging when you realize that they’re only in school a fraction of their day. Home environment matters, too.

“We often see little empathy for gifted students because too many think “they are going to be just fine.” 4 students in my 2nd grade g/t class didn’t graduate from HS. They are not going to be “just fine.” And even if they were, is “just fine,” really good enough?” ~ Colin E. Seale

Emotional empathy can be extremely difficult to foster in classrooms where teachers are overworked, underpaid and expected to be defender, counselor and psychologist all while trying to teach. It can be integrated across the curriculum with careful and thoughtful planning and included by subtle reminders to students to think before they speak to or act toward others.

“Using mentor texts is a great way to teach empathy because it’s not personal.  You might select a story about a kid who is struggling socially but has a lot going on at home that people don’t know about. It’s harder for students to start with trying to understand what’s really going on behind the scenes with someone who is targeting or being mean to them.” ~ Sarah Pfeiler

Intellectual empathy must be modeled by teachers and administrators every single day. It isn’t enough to touch upon occasionally. It should be an integral part of lesson planning throughout the school year. It requires teachers to thoughtfully listen and respond to students in a respectful manner. GT students don’t tolerate ‘lip service’ when they are giving careful consideration to the questions they’re asked.

“Building Empathy vs. Academic Rigor is a false choice! When your instruction involves analysis of multiple perspectives, root cause analysis, collaboration, and design thinking, you necessarily enhance our students’ ability to put themselves in someone else’s shoes.” ~ Colin E. Seale

Intellectual empathy is drowned out by emphasis on test prep, lack of support staff, tight budgets and time constraints which redirect discourse to rote learning and preconceived notions of what is meant be ‘education’. It is not valued any longer by society; it’s not included in the standards. Base knowledge trumps comprehension in most general education classrooms where GT students spend a majority of their time.

We all can play a role in teaching empathy in an effort to build critical thinking. It’s important to realize the impact it has on the lives of students. A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2 PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

thinkLaw website

The thinkLaw Team

Help Me Understand: 4 Ways to Use Critical Thinking to Develop Empathy

The Critical Thinking Gap: How thinkLaw is Fighting the Equity Issue of Access to Deeper Learning

The State of Critical Thinking Part 1: What is Critical Thinking?

The State of Critical Thinking Part 2: Persevering When Thinking Gets Hard

Webinar: It’s Time for a Critical Thinking Revolution!

Empathy plus Critical Thinking equals Compassionate Action

What are the Importance and Benefits of “Critical Thinking Skills”?

How to Be Empathetic

How Dialogue Teaches Critical Thinking and Empathy

How Cross-Cultural Dialogue Builds Critical Thinking and Empathy

Compassionate Critical Thinking: How Mindfulness, Creativity, Empathy, and Socratic Questioning Can Transform Teaching (Amazon)

How Empathy Affects Learning, And How to Cultivate It In Your Students

Teaching Empathy through Design Thinking

Template Independent POV Project (Google Doc)

Bad Luck? An Exercise in Critical Thinking for St. Patrick’s Day (TPT)

Story Telling with Persona Dolls (pdf)

Cybraryman’s Empathy Page

Gifted Unit Plan (Google Doc)

40 Kindness Activities and Empathy Worksheets for Students and Adults

Five Principles of Extraordinary Math Teaching (TEDx 14:41)

Emotional Intensity in Gifted Children

The Care & Feeding of Advanced Readers Resources (Google Drive)

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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