Category Archives: family

Best Movies & Television for Inspiring Gifted Kids

gtchat 06142018 Movies

This week at #gtchat, we explored movies and television that inspire gifted kids. They can portray gifted children in a negative light. Negativity, however, is often in the eye of the beholder. Movies and television programs reflect popular culture; and for that reason portray gifted children in a way they feel meets their audience’s expectations. Those which show gifted children in a one-dimensional light – smart kid who’s socially inept; the perfect student; a child regarded only for their contributions to society … these are negative portrayals.

What’s the downside of movies and television portraying gifted children only as geniuses or nerds? Kids are kids; they process what they see on the big and small screen. Gifted children rarely receive guidance on how to perceive these images and many adopt negative responses to being seen only for their intelligence or talents. When gifted children believe that they are only appreciated for their brain power, it can affect not only their behavior towards others but also their self-image. A poor self-image can lead to mental health issues and worse.

When gifted children see kids like themselves valued by society in films and television, they will benefit in how they see themselves and how they interact with others. Self-worth is a powerful motivator to be successful, respectful, and empathetic toward others. It improves their quality of life and of those around them; with family members, schoolmates, and teachers.

“When gifted kids see an “average” child in film or on television, they don’t see a reflection of themselves. They see someone with whom they can’t identify. This contributes to a sense separateness & increases feelings of isolation. Representation does the opposite.” ~ Jeffrey Farley, M.Ed., District Special Programs Coordinator, Beaumont ISD

When integrated into a gifted curriculum, movies and television can be a powerful teaching tool to guide students; to project role-models; to inspire creativity; to promote social consciousness. Using film and television in the classroom requires careful scrutiny of resources prior to their use. Teachers should be cognizant of individual needs of their students.

Many are fans of the recent movie, “Gifted”. They did a good job of portraying a multi-dimensional character in a highly relatable situation in a realistic way. It was obvious they knew their subject matter. Another film, Incredibles 2, debuts this week. The original, The Incredibles, has been a favorite of parents. Many films in the scifi genre include gifted children. They can often provide kids with a positive role-model.

Please check out our resources listed below! A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet which includes many great suggestions for movies and television programs that can inspire gifted children.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Movie: Gifted (2017) (Preview YouTube 2:34)

Movie: The Incredibles (Trailer YouTube 2:24)

Movie: The Incredibles 2 (Trailer YouTube 2:16)

Reel Life this Ain’t

Sprite’s Site: Gifted in Reel Life

Columbo: Breaking Gifted Stereotypes

Movies Featuring Gifted Kids (and Adults!)

25 of Our Favorite Gifted Kid Movies

Giftedness in the Media

Film Producer Seeks Honest Portrayal of Growing Up Gifted

10 Movies Gifted Children Will Love

Gifted Role Models in Literature and Film

The Impact of Popular Culture on Gifted Children

Cinematherapy in Gifted Education Identity Development: Integrating the Arts through STEM-Themed Movies (pdf)

Using Movies to Guide: Teachers and Counselors Collaborating to Support Gifted Students (pdf)

Fostering The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children through Guided Viewing of Film

The Literacy Shed: Alma

Sprite’s Site: Googlebox

Sprite’s Site: Googlebox 2

Cybraryman’s Teaching with Movies Page

Observations on Gifted the Movie

AUS: Gifted Resources Film Discussion Series

Duke TIP: A Look at the Movie “Gifted”

GHF: Gifted in Reel Life

Image used with permission

 

Chat image courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

 

Advertisements

How Home & School Environment Affect Student Achievement

gtchat 05242018 Achievement

How should student achievement be measured? Many schools are moving away from traditional measurements such as letter grades and testing. Assessment of achievement should reflect a student’s ability to use and understand what they’ve learned.

There is strong evidence that school climate – student/teacher relationships; values and norms; shared practices – affects student achievement. Students respond when schools emphasize academic excellence and promote positive interpersonal relationships.

Educators as role models impact students’ establishing goals for knowledge attainment, how they view their personal strengths, and their goals for the future. In contrast, students will assume negative perceptions by teachers of their abilities; such as, being thought of as lazy, unmotivated, or lacking ability. Teachers can have a positive effect on student achievement by encouraging students to do their best and by having high expectations of student performance.

School-wide interventions promoting healthy interpersonal relationships can drive improvement in student achievement. Interventions should stress building strong bonds between school mission and removal of barriers to full participation by all students in school activities fostering an affinity for school.

The home environment sets the stage for openness to learning; appreciation for achievement; and opportunity for learning outside of school. Creating a positive atmosphere in the home that nurtures, encourages, and responds to a child’s needs in a caring and fostering way will promote healthy academic achievement. A positive home environment that promotes student achievement will include provide ample reading materials, visits to libraries and regional enrichment opportunities such as museums or historical sites & time with intellectual peers.

Parents purposefully involving themselves in their child’s academic life by setting a positive tone about the importance of education can strongly influence achievement.  When parents and caregivers provide strong and clear messages about aspirations for their children regarding school performance, student achievement is positively impacted. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Big changes at TAGT! This week,  the appointment of Strategic Association Management was announced as our new management model and Paulina van Eeden Hill, CAE, as TAGT’s new Executive Director. Read more about these exciting changes here. Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT welcomes Paulina and looks forward to working with her and the great team at TAGT.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Factors Relating to the Academic Achievement and Home Environment in Economics of Higher Secondary Students

Educational Environment and Student Achievement (pdf)

How parental involvement affects student achievement

A New Wave of Evidence The Impact of School, Family, and Community Connections on Student Achievement (pdf)

Ready for Success: Creating Collaborative and Thoughtful Transitions into Kindergarten

Reframing Family Involvement in Education: Supporting Families to Support Educational Equity

The Impact of School Climate and School Identification on Academic Achievement: Multilevel Modeling with Student and Teacher Data

What are the Effects of the Home Environment on Learning?

The Link between School Environments and Student Academic Performance 

The Impact of Home Environment Factors on Academic Achievement of Adolescents (pdf)

How Does Your Child’s Teacher Influence Academic Performance?

Do Teaching Practices Matter for Students’ Academic Achievement? (pdf)

The Family Effect on Academic Performance in School

The Importance of Home Environment and Parental Encouragement in the Academic Achievement of African‐Canadian Youth (pdf)

Does the school building itself play a role in student achievement?

Home and School Factors as Determinants of Students’ Achievement in Senior Secondary School English Comprehension in Four South Western States (Nigeria) (pdf)

Young ICT Explorers

Sprite’s Site: Gifted Under Achievers

Cybraryman’s Learning Pages

Cybraryman’s Study Skills/Organization Pages

What Adults Can Learn from Kids (TED2010 8:06)

Boost: 12 Effective Ways to Lift Up Our Twice-Exceptional Children (Amazon)

Mind Matters Podcasts: The Over-Under on Achievement with Dr. Jim Delisle

Image courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Optimizing Asynchronous Development

gtchat 05102018 Asynchronous

The term asynchronous development was originally conceptualized by a group known as the Columbus Group. It is widely accepted today relating to gifted children. The Columbus Group defined asynchronous development as children whose inner experiences and awareness due to intellect and intensities were qualitatively different from the norm. They believed parenting, teaching and counseling required modifications in order for gifted children to develop optimally.

It is important to understand giftedness through the lens of asynchronous development. Initially, gifted children may not comprehend the role of asynchronous development in their lives on a very personal level. They need guidance. Society’s expectations of how a child should act and how a smart child should act put undue pressure on these kids that can have severe consequences for them and society.

There are paradoxes presented by asynchronous development. It can, but not in all cases, mean a child can achieve at levels well beyond what is expected for their chronological age. Asynchronous development may result in a child being placed in an academically appropriate place that fails to accommodate their social-emotional needs.

How does asynchronous development affect the behavioral and emotional aspects of giftedness? Once a child is identified as gifted, society tends to judge them solely on their achievements and how they perform without regard to social-emotional aspects. It can create a wildly different life experience for the gifted child; one that lacks the understanding and empathy of adults.

Adults can support a gifted child’s asynchronous development so that they aren’t overwhelmed by their ability to perceive the complexity of the world around them. Ideally, a gifted child’s social-emotional needs will be respected in conjunction with their gifts and talents. Recognizing the need is a good first step. Adults need to be hyper-aware of each gifted child’s unique challenges and develop individualized education plans that address the whole child.

Where can parents seek information about asynchronous development? One of the best books for parents is “Off the Charts.” It’s a compilation of works; many by members of the Columbus Group. The NAGC, SENG and IEA Gifted have extensive resources for parents seeking information on asynchronous development. State organizations may have additional local info as well. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Off the Charts: Asynchrony and the Gifted Child (Amazon)

Definition of Asynchronous Development in Children

Asynchronous Development: An Alternate View of Giftedness

Asynchronous Development in Gifted Kids

Many Ages at Once

The Neural Plasticity of Giftedness

Giftedness: The View from Within

Asynchronous Development

Asynchronous Development (NAGC)

UK: The Misidentification & Misdiagnosis of Gifted Children

Gifted Children Do Exist Here’s What Happen when We Deny It 

What I Want You to Know about My Gifted Son

Supporting Gifted Children

Parent Hot Sheet: Asynchronous Development (pdf) (NAGC)

Life in the Asynchronous Family

Asynchronous Development

The Columbus Group

Sprite’s Site: Beginning the Journey – Gifted 101

Giftedness As Asynchronous Development

4 Fabulous Ways for Kids to Pamper Mom on Mother’s Day

Image courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Sibling Rivalry in Gifted Families

gtchat 05032018 Siblings

 

ALL children need to feel valued regardless of ability. It is a delicate balancing act. Parents must often be there for siblings when one is identified for a particular gifted program and another one is not. Gifted rivalry is not accidental. It’s important to realize intentions and counseling siblings is an important parental responsibility. It can extend to the selection of colleges, participation in academic competitions and affect acceleration decisions.

What role does ‘asynchronous development’ play in gifted sibling rivalry? It can dramatically change a child’s place in the family; such as when a younger child surpasses an older sibling academically (think Young Sheldon). This can affect decisions about acceleration. Asynchronous development can ultimately cause excessive stress on parents who themselves may not be able to ‘keep up’ with their child’s intellectual progress. Younger children who are profoundly gifted may be confused or feel constrained by what they can do socially because of their chronological age.

To minimize sibling rivalries, parents can avoid comparisons, emphasize strengths, reminding child of their uniqueness, and not give more privileges to one child over the other. Furthermore, they can be minimized by not assuming that problems will arise, teaching ‘fair’ doesn’t mean equal, and remembering that not all strengths and talents are either academics or sports. Parents can try their best to spend quality time with each child; providing companionship and time alone with each one.

What can parents do to build positive and cooperative relationships in the gifted family? They can value their child’s point of view as a way to encourage cooperation and value the strengths and weaknesses of each child while acknowledging their differences.

Schools can offer resources to parents of gifted children with mixed abilities. They can suggest parents utilize school guidance counselors and enlist a favorite teacher when necessary to encourage a student to model good behavior at home. Finally, schools should maintain a positive parent-school relationship by offering resources to parents such as providing opportunities for gifted children to explore interests and passions. A transcript may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

When One Child Is Gifted: Avoiding Sibling Rivalry

How Gifted Children Impact the Family

A Gifted Child Increases Sibling Rivalry, Study Finds

The Effects of Sibling Competition

Comparing Gifted and Non-Gifted Sibling Perceptions of Family Relations (pdf 1982)

Gifted and Non-Gifted Siblings: How Conventional Wisdom is Wrong

The Social World of Gifted Children and Youth (pdf)

When One Sibling is More “Gifted” Than the Other

Tempo: Guidance & Counseling of Gifted Students

Life in the Asynchronous Family

Siblings of Twice-Exceptional Children

A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (Amazon)

Congrats, Your Kid is Gifted…But What About Her Sibling?

Keeping the Family Balance

Setting Boundaries for Gifted Siblings

Sibling Relationships in Families with Gifted Children (pdf)

Cybraryman’s Gifted and Talented Page

Image courtesy of Pixabay    CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

%d bloggers like this: