Category Archives: gifted education

Reenvisioning Education through Hybrid Learning

 

This week at #gtchat we looked at hybrid learning, how it differs from blended learning and the benefits for GT students. Blended learning has traditionally been championed in the K12 learning environment balancing in class, face to face learning with online learning within a particular class. Hybrid learning, a more nuanced form of blended learning, was previously developed and used in collegiate settings. Hybrid learning is multi-faceted. It combines traditional classroom experiences with online classes and experiential learning in a refined way to meet the individual needs of students. Hybrid learning is tantamount to every gifted advocate’s dream of what educating a GT student should look like … individualized programs that address very specific needs while providing all learners an appropriate education.

How can hybrid learning address educational needs in the era of #COVID19? It has become apparent that ‘going’ to school will look a whole lot different in the upcoming school year, regardless of where you live, than in previous years. And, this change may well be in place for some time. Lessons learned at the university level can serve the K12 community well … individualized response to students needs with varying degrees of face to face time, learning through experience as well as distance learning. Hybrid learning will need to evolve; to become more flexible and all stakeholders will need respond will equal flexibility. The foe is no longer an entity or person … the school board, the classroom teacher, the parent … but a virus.

What facets of hybrid learning are best for f2f & which are best for online options? Face to face interaction is best served in traditional classrooms which foster socialization, discussing expectations and responsibilities, demonstrating skills and providing feedback. Face to face interaction is also a plus for experiential learning such as job shadowing, mentoring, internships, and research projects. Online learning can enhance group work through collaboration with intellectual peers, provide opportunity for reflection and critical analysis as well as for self-paced learning and self-assessment. It is an excellent way to serve the needs of rural learners by providing access to high quality instruction and resources not readily available to this population of students.

Assessments of hybrid learning must be grounded in best practices and reflect the individual needs of the learner. Daily interactions can reinforce positive behaviors and help shape both content and course objectives. Assessments may be summative such as projects or portfolios. They can be formative such as discussions (in class and online) or traditional homework assignments when attendance is unpredictable. By using assessment tools to gather data, the resulting analytics provide information about how well students are retaining what they learn and when mastery occurs in all aspects of hybrid learning.

Regardless what approach school districts take to providing education in the era of #COVID19, it is going to profoundly challenge parents in all aspects of their lives. The learning curve will be steep. The initial response to the onset of #COVID19 was sudden and somewhat unpredictable, but few realized the extent and duration of the response which was going to be needed. Reality is forcing uncomfortable decisions. It’s doubtful that most schools and institutions will fully grasp the consequences or be able to provide perfect solutions for all stakeholders. There will need to be cooperation from employers, caregivers, and all education providers.

Hybrid learning can meet many of our current needs. It takes time to design and implement quality programs. Utilizing readily available resources is key to streamlining the planning process. Above all, we must realize that this is a new and difficult time for everyone involved.  Its important to anticipate problems and have a responsive action plan ready; be willing to ask for student feedback and then manage student expectations. Hybrid learning may be beneficial for the times in which we live, but may well prove to be the future of education we needed … a silver lining to a terrible situation.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

What is Hybrid Learning? How to Implement a Hybrid eLearning Strategy

Fast Forward: Hybrid Models Could Prove Effective. Are they here to stay?

NC: State Board of Education Sets Requirements for 2020-21 Remote Instruction Plans

Edutopia: Answers to Your Blended Learning Questions

An Introduction to Hybrid Teaching (pdf)

Moving to a Hybrid Learning Model

State Board of Education Sets Requirements for 2020-21 Remote Instruction Plans

What Is the Difference Between Hybrid and Blended Learning?

Microsoft: Reimagining Education: From Remote to Hybrid Learning

What Will Return to School Look Like This Fall? A Look Inside Hybrid Learning Plans

What is Hybrid Learning? Here’s Everything You Need to Know

Wired: When Schools Reopen, Don’t Ditch Online Learning

Toward a Hybrid Learning System Post COVID-19

The New Fall Look for School: A Hybrid Learning Environment

Investigating Students’ Engagement in a Hybrid Learning Environment

Brownsville ISD to Provide Hybrid Learning Options for Students in Upcoming School Year

Dallas ISD May Adopt Hybrid Learning Plan, Build New School Campus Devoted to Partial At-Home Learning

K-12 Students in Indiana Likely to have ‘Hybrid’ Experience Next School Year

IL: District 150 Looking at Childcare Solutions Due to Hybrid Learning

Plano ISD, Collin College Announce Possibility of ‘Hybrid’ Learning

Florida & Miami-Dade Public Schools Preparing Hybrid/Blended Learning Models

‘Hybrid Learning’ to Be New Normal as California Schools Reopen

 

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

Acceleration: Its Time Has Come

In ‘A Nation Empowered’, there are 20 different types of academic acceleration identified. Most have been available for decades, but may prove beneficial today more than ever. Implementing acceleration now is good policy. Academic acceleration encompasses early in and out approaches to education; grade or subject skipping; mastery-based learning; independent study (self-paced education); and dual enrollment. Additional types of academic acceleration include multi-age classes; curriculum compacting; telescoping curriculum; and credit by exam.

In a field that places so much importance on research-based evidence, it is difficult to understand the skepticism that surrounds academic acceleration. Isolated instances of poorly planned acceleration too often make the headlines … in sharp contrast to the enormous amount evidence to the contrary. In fact, not accelerating a student whose situation indicates a need and willingness to do so has more negative repercussions than any perceived issues with acceleration. These students face disengagement due to boredom and higher drop-out rates.

When schools begin to re-open, budgets are going to be stretched to the brink. We’ve already begun to see gifted education programs being slashed from school budgets. These students’ needs aren’t going anywhere. The effects of being out of school for so many months have been devastating for a majority of students. The perceived need for extensive remediation will exacerbate the GT students’ need for greater depth and complexity. At all grade levels, K-College, it makes sense to allow students to progress through the system at their own speed with any means at their disposal … early entrance & graduation, distance learning, self-pacing, etc.

Best practices in academic acceleration starts with planning, planning, planning … what’s available, student buy-in, a strong commitment to the end-game, & the need to address the consequences of not making it available. Questions to ask before beginning acceleration – does the school have an adequate K12 infrastructure in place to support acceleration, how will acceleration benefit the student, & is there an exit-strategy if it isn’t working. Best practices include choosing appropriate assessments, a written acceleration plan with decisive objectives/goals, addressing academic gaps, and periodic follow-up.

Parents are often the first to assess their child’s potential. To facilitate the process of requesting consideration for acceleration, it is imperative that parents document early abilities, task and work completion, and outside test results. The first point of contact with the school should be the classroom teacher. Parents can request test data or appropriate testing, what resources are available, and to have the formation of a formal assessment team. Parents should document all communication with the school, take notes at all meetings, and be prepared to advocate with research-based evidence for all necessary services for their child.

Gifted education has long been cited for glaring inequities in how students are placed in gifted programs. In light of issues highlighted by the sudden onset of the coronavirus, it would seem a good time to reevaluate the process. Likewise, there has never been a problem with accelerating exceptional talent when it comes to sports. Perhaps it’s time to take a page out of the athletic playbook? Recent state programs that automatically enroll qualified students in advanced coursework have met with high levels of success and are far more reflective of the racial and socioeconomic makeup of their schools.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Why is Academic Acceleration (Still) So Controversial?

Early to the Starting Line: Acceleration Begins at Kindergarten (Podcast 31:27)

Academic Acceleration (YouTube 5:35)

College at 13: Young, Gifted, and Purposeful (book)

Acceleration: Topical Research Series #1

Academic Acceleration for Advanced Learners

Academic Acceleration Can Help Students Whose Needs Are Not Being Met (pdf)

NAGC: Parent TIP Sheet – Acceleration (pdf 2017)

Essential Elements: Acceleration & Differentiation for Gifted K-12 Students with Dr. Broderick (YouTube 20:28)

Belin Blank: Gifted Education 101: The Basics

Developing Academic Acceleration Policies: Whole Grade, Early Entrance & Single Subject

Belin Blank Chautauqua Classes Summer 2020 via ZOOM

Belin Blank FLOW Webinars

Guidebooks for Parents and Educators

Why am I an Advocate for Academic Acceleration?

20 Types of Acceleration

Advocating for Acceleration: Suggestions for Parents

Acceleration for Gifted Students

How to Advocate for Acceleration at Your School

Must Run in the Family: PEG Program Gets Its First Legacy Student

Academic Acceleration: Is It Right for My Child?

AUS: Acceleration of Gifted Students Procedure

Laddering Up: Academic Acceleration

Learning Acceleration Guide Planning for Acceleration in the 2020- 2021 School Year (pdf)

Social-emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-accelerated Students in the Netherlands

BISD: Advanced Academics Acceleration

Pros and Cons of Skipping a Grade

Sprite’s Site: Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 6

NAGC PHP: Advocating for Grade-Based Acceleration (pdf)

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

A Summer of Opportunities

 

With so much upheaval in our world, we that it might be a good time to chat about all the opportunities available this summer.  How can we make the upcoming months teachable moments – critical thinking about the spread of the virus, empathy, grace towards others? Every single person involved in education has experienced some level of trauma. Consideration of others will be of the upmost important when schools resume. Simply because schools reopen should not imply that the risks from the spread of coronavirus have been eliminated. Class instruction and discussion should take this into account.

A lot has been said about re-imagining education. This may be the time to advocate for best practices in gifted education – such as, acceleration and mastery-based learning. Many schools are now planning to resume in person classes this summer as well as online options for students who prefer to wait. Most experts seem to agree that outdoor summer activities such as day camps are viable options for students.

If we have learned nothing else, it is that schools are so much more than simply an institution for delivering instruction. For many students, it is a place of shelter, a source of nourishment, and where children develop social skills. Schools must work to provide students with a clean, anti-viral atmosphere where they feel safe to return to.  The summer months will be a time for significant planning to ensure that teachers & staff are prepared to meet the trauma-induced needs of returning students.

How can educators use their summer break to personally prepare for a return to school? After so much time out of the classroom, the summer break can be a time to prepare for the unforeseen. Although schools may resume in coming months, classes could be suspended just as quickly as they did in the spring. This summer, most professional development opportunities are being offered online. This eliminates costly travel and related expenses making it a great option for expanded learning.

How can parents best use (non-academic) the summer months while respecting the presence of #COVID19? Most parents have had to suddenly become surrogate teachers over the past few months and summer may be a time to get reacquainted with summertime parenting. With so many under quarantine for many months, the upcoming summer months should include time outside and time for play while certainly respecting the presence of the coronavirus.

With so many impending changes to how we educate our children, this summer needs to involve some form of professional development with specific consideration of safety procedures for both students and teachers. This summer, all of us should be open to the possibility of significant changes and how we’ll adapt when schools eventually reopen.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

TX: Pasadena ISD Summer School Expected to be Busy Because Of Pandemic

TX: Pasadena ISD Summer Information for ECHS (Early College High School) Class of 2024

NAGC: At-Home Summer Fun for Creative Kids & Families for June 2020 (pdf)

NAGC: Beyond School Walls: What Parents Can Do to Widen the Horizons of Their Gifted Learners (pdf)

NAGC: Getting Gifted Kids Outdoors – Tips for a Summer of Play (pdf)

NAGC: Summertime and the Livin’ is Easy (pdf)

Summer Institute for the Gifted 2020

NuMinds Enrichment: Camp Pursuit 2020

Michigan State University Gifted and Talented Education Summer Programs 2020 – Live Online (Apply by 6/15)

Northwestern University: Center for Talent Development Online Summer Programs 2020

Columbia University Teachers College: Summer Certification

Texas Wildlife Association Youth On-Demand Webinars

NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative (Digital Badging)

Rodriguez Resources GT (Google Docs)

Summer Writing Residency Online

Depth and Complexity RULES Webinar Series

National Inventors Hall of Fame Summer Programs 2020

Turning Challenges into Opportunities with Open Educational Resources

MENSA: At-home Learning Resources for Kids

PAGE: Gifted and Talented Resources

MO: Springfield Public Schools Announces In-Person Classes for July’s Session of Explore

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

GT Education Post COVID19

 

Teachers are reporting both in the US and Australia that shy, hyperactive, and highly creative kids are thriving out of the classroom. These were kids they were concerned about while school was still in session. GT students are expressing relief at being at home in an environment where they can self-pace, be able to independently structure their day, have fewer distractions, and have time to work on passion projects. Older GT students feel less pressure due to less standardized testing, fewer extracurricular activities required to bolster college admissions, and freedom from social peer pressures.

What unique challenges have existed for our twice-exceptional students during quarantine? Our 2E kids often have additional needs for one-on-one support which may not be possible in the home setting. Without a more formal schedule for task completion, some struggle with getting school work done. Many twice-exceptional students have multiple services in school such as OT, PT, Speech and SEL counseling. Most parents cannot provide all these supports at home.

Inequities in education that existed before the pandemic are being highlighted now such as the digital divide: access to technology and Internet access. GT students in low income areas are experiencing food insecurity, have parents & family members who must work outside the home & aren’t available to monitor school work, or lack access to mentoring/enrichment activities. Education is highly influenced by negative factors – test anxiety, bullying, income disparity, inflexible rules, passive learning vs. engaged learning, and failure to take into account student voice.

What positive effects of e-learning can we use to inform the future of education? One of the most profound effects e-learning has revealed is the antiquated approach to educating students. Time in seat does not equal learning. Much of a student’s time in school is wasted time. The future of education must realize that test scores on standardized tests does not indicate what a student has ‘learned’. It indicates how well a student tests. Unstructured time can be used for creative expression, contemplating possibilities, pursuit of passions, collaborative projects, and the potential for much needed rest.

As budgets tighten for school districts, how can they avoid eliminating gifted education? Gifted education never needed to be expensive; it needed to overcome false narratives created as excuses for not providing an appropriate education for GT students. Gifted education advocates need to do more than raise their voices; they need to offer solutions to providing equitable education to all students rather than as an alternative program, but also one which meets GT students’ needs. School districts and administrators must acknowledge the existence of GT and Twice-exceptional students who have educational and social-emotional needs. FAPE applies to ALL students.

Quarantine/Time-at-Home during this global crisis has been revelatory and should be seen as an opportunity to transform educational practices; especially regarding gifted education. Advocates for gifted education have been advocating competency-based learning, acceleration, and personalized learning. We must reimagine  education based on a student’s needs and creative abilities rather than a return to the status quo based on a system organized for the benefit of adults.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

AUS: The Students Who are in the Zone Studying at Home

Why Are Some Kids Thriving During Remote Learning?

Gifted Development Center: My Future…What Now? Teens talk about moving forward in our challenging times with Dr. Jim Delisle (YouTube 1:04)

Meeting the Needs of Gifted Learners at a Distance – A Focus on Grades 4-8

Cultivating Calm Amidst a Storm

Parenting for High Potential: Management of Anxiety Begins at Home (pdf)

Coping With the Stress of COVID-19: Tips for Families with Gifted Children (YouTube 9:13)

Resources for Providing Young Children Academic Support During the Quarantine

COVID-19 and Anxiety in Gifted Children

IAGC: 3 Top Strategies for Helping Your Child Cope with Anxiety during Challenging Times (YouTube 20:09)

What if We… Don’t Return to School as Usual (Medium)

The Invisible Blizzard and the Importance of E-learning

Unpacking Adult Mindsets (pdf 2002)

Mind Matters Podcast: Preparing for Post Pandemic Recovery (Audio 36:16)

Transitioning Gifted Education Online: A World of Possibilities

NAGC: Supporting Advanced Learners: New Roles for Parent Advocates during Times of Remote Learning

Fort Bend ISD: Covid-19 Gifted and Talented Resources

Special Solocast: Thoughts on Parenting Differently Wired Kids through a Pandemic (Audio 14:15)

Short Story Exploration (pdf)

6 Ways to Transition IEP Goals to Remote Learning

Parent Involvement Has Always Mattered. Will The COVID-19 Pandemic Finally Make This The New Normal In K-12 Education?

Distance Learning During The Coronavirus Pandemic: Equity And Access Questions For School Leaders

Image courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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