Monthly Archives: December 2020

2020 Retrospective: The Lost Year

This week’s #gtchat was a look back at 2020! A transcript can be found at Wakelet. Resources from the chat can be found below. This was the final chat of the year. We wish you all a very happy holiday season from all of us at Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT!

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/Midnight UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

The Impact of #COVID-19 on Education: Insights from Education at a Glance 2020 (pdf)

#COVID-19 and Student Performance, Equity, and U.S. Education Policy | Economic Policy Institute

Policy Brief: Education during COVID-19 and Beyond (pdf) | United Nations

A Roundup of COVID-19’s Impact on Higher Education

3 #COVID-19 Education Trends Set to Persist Post-Pandemic

#COVID-19 and Human Development: Assessing the Crisis, Envisioning the Recovery | United Nations Development Programme

The #COVID-19 Pandemic: Shocks to Education and Policy Responses | The World Bank

Putting the ‘Learning’ Back in Remote Learning: Policies to Uphold Effective Continuity of Learning through #COVID-19 (pdf) | UNICEF

Education in a Post-COVID World: Nine Ideas for Public Action (pdf) | United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization

Time to Fix American Education with Race-for-Space Resolve | The Harvard Gazette

The Impact of #COVID-19 on Student Achievement and What It May Mean for Educators

How will #COVID-19 Change Our Schools in the Long Run?

The 10 Most Significant Education Studies of 2020

 
What Educators Are Learning during the Pandemic

3 Keys to a Better 2020–21

The Top 6 Trends in Education for 2020 

Education in 2020 – The end of the classroom? | Education World 

Schooling disrupted, Schooling Rethought How the Covid-19 Pandemic is Changing Education (pdf) | OECD 

Education: From Disruption to Recovery | UNESCO 

COVID-19’s Long-Term Impacts on Education in 2020 and Beyond

Will 2020 be remembered as the year in which education was changed? 

‘Panic-gogy’: Teaching Online Classes during the Coronavirus Pandemic | NPR 

20 Teachers Share How Education Will Change in 2021

Here’s Why 2021 Could Be another Big Year for Smart Education and Learning Market with Top Industry Leaders

Cybraryman’s 4 Cs+ Page

Images courtesy of Pixabay & Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad

The Gifted Introvert

It’s no surprise that we would chat about introverts at #gtchat! Some characteristics of introverts include preferring to work on their own rather than in large groups; may have limited, but deep interests; and need time alone to recharge. Introverts may exhibit deep concentration and appear absorbed in their thoughts; are reserved, deliberate and prefer one-on-one communication; and can become irritated when they don’t have enough ‘alone time’. Introverts form strong (but few) relationships, are generally self-sufficient, self-actualizing, and high achievers.

There are many misconceptions about those who are introverts; it is a choice, it can be ‘fixed’, it is simply being shy. Introverts may appear bored, but are simply deep in thought. They may seem socially awkward, but are not interested in their surroundings. Others may view introverts as judgmental when they have no opinion about the situation or person.

What is the relationship between giftedness and being introverted? Gifted individuals can be introverts or extroverts. Some research suggests a higher proportion of the gifted population is introverted. (Gallagher, 1990; Hoehn & Birely, 1988)  Being identified as gifted and possibly being introverted is a relationship; the characteristics of thoughtfulness, introspection, deliberateness, reflection, hard work, and confidence compliment gifted individuals. Gifted introverts tend to think before they speak, consider who they are speaking to first, do not crave attention, ‘enjoy’ time alone, prefer quality rather than numerous friendships, and pay attention to others.

Gifted introverts tend to think before they speak, consider who they are speaking to first, do not crave attention, ‘enjoy’ time alone, prefer quality rather than numerous friendships, and pay attention to others. Strategies which support introverted students include allowing thinking time, flexible seating, providing personal space, allow students to work in small groups or pairs, or consider interest-based assignments. Additional strategies can include providing opportunities for self-paced learning, independent study, the option to provide responses in writing, or encourage self-reflection.

What strategies can teachers use for online learning for introverted students? It might seem that online learning would be ideal for introverted students, but this is not always the case. Being on ZOOM or Teams all day long may be just as overwhelming. Zoom fatigue can be a real problem. When introverted students are confronted with technical issues and disruptions in Internet connections can add to their anxiety. Teachers can allow for additional breaks for introverted students, permit students to be on mute during discussions, or allow them to turn off their cameras while online.

Parenting an introvert requires understanding that they aren’t going to change, need their personal space and quiet time (especially after a long day at school), and does not need to have a lot of friends to be happy. An introverted gifted child needs opportunities to extend learning beyond the classroom, work on projects of interest, and to make friends on their own terms.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/Midnight UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Companion Website to Susan Cain’s Book Quiet

The Quiet Personality Test (Sign-up required)

Introvert, Dear (Online Community of Introverts)  

Go Away; I’m Introverting

Introverts, Extroverts, and Social Distancing

The Anxieties of Introversion

Understanding the Gifted Introvert

Introversion: The Often Forgotten Factor Impacting the Gifted (pdf) | Center for Gifted Education – College of William and Mary

High Ability: The Gifted Introvert

Talent Development Resources: Introversion, Sensitivity, Shyness – Are They the Same?

The Happy Introvert: A Wild and Crazy Guide to Celebrating Your True Self (Kindle)

Make Your Class Cozy for Gifted Introverts

Gifted Introverts and Extroverts

Introvert Social Needs and Preferences

The Overlooked Significant Population – Introverts

Which One Is You?: 4 Types of Introverts and Self-Care Tips to Be Your Own Hero

Living a Quiet Life

Extroverts (and Introverts, too) Face Quarantine Challenges

The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World (book)

Building a Strong Relationship With Your Introverted Child

Here’s What You Need to Know If You’re the Parent of an Introvert

Responding to Introverted and Shy Students: Best Practice Guidelines for Educators and Advisors | Open Journal of Nursing

6 Informal Assessments to Engage Introverted Students: Creating Accessible Classrooms for Introverted Students, Online or In Person

5 Ways Virtual Classrooms Help Introverts

Teaching Introverted Students: A Guide for Educators and Parents

How to Understand and Work with Introverted Students

Introverts Aren’t Actually Better at Social Distancing

Chat: The Introvert’s Secret Remote Weapon – Leading by Typing during the Pandemic

Cybraryman’s Introverted Students Page

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Best Advice for Teachers New to Gifted Education

Roles and responsibilities of a GT teacher are a response to the school setting in which they find themselves. It makes a real difference if students are being served in the general ed classroom, during pull-out, or in a standalone program. Teachers, co-teachers, GT specialists, and resource teachers should all be responsible for understanding what it means to be identified as a GT student and be willing to advocate for their students’ education. GT teachers should be cognizant of the fact that their students know no bounds, are from every background (ethnically, socially, SES), and may potentially be twice-exceptional. Many, perhaps most, are outliers.

What differences exist between expectations and classroom realities for new GT teachers? When new GT teachers have had little exposure to gifted education or experience with GT students, it can be an eye-opening experience. Presumptions are often disposed of quickly in the classroom. Oftentimes, teachers’ new to gifted education expectations revolve around academic excellence which may be present or not. GT students may consider these expectations irrelevant. Not all are ‘teacher pleasers’. GT students need their teachers for guidance and as advocates. They will not always ‘make it on their own’. They need time with intellectual peers and mentors. They should not be used as teaching assistants. The GT student may be the class clown, an underachiever, or asleep in the back of the room. They may appear rude, argumentative, or the first to challenge authority. They may struggle with asynchronous development.

What do teachers new to gifted education need to know about 2E learners? First and foremost that they exist. Twice-exceptional learners are not lazy. They must confront both internal and external struggles that others – adults, age-peers, family members – may lack the ability to understand. Twice-exceptional learners are often difficult to identify; and when acknowledged, their deficits are considered more important than their strengths to be accommodated. Multiple approaches need to be utilized to best serve twice-exceptional kids. IEPs, GIEPs, AIG, and 504 plans should be used together when available; with gifted plans taking precedent.

Best practices should be used for ensuring equitable identification/programming for under-represented gifted populations. Assess every student. Use multiple types of assessments when necessary. Be aware of test bias. Schools should consider (with additional qualification) non-standard assessments such as teacher referrals, parent referrals, and even a student’s self-nomination. It is important to guard against not only test bias, but implicit bias of the person administering the test as well as cultural and gender bias.

What should new GT teachers know about differentiation, curriculum, assessment & instruction for gifted learners? In a word … everything. There is extensive literature dedicated to differentiation (see resources below). Specific GT curriculum, assessment and instruction which is research-based is essential for GT learners. Assessment and instruction, at times, may need to be highly personalized. Allowing GT students to take the lead in helping design instruction will take many educators out of their comfort zone, but be beneficial to the student. It’s also important to accept the fact that the student may actually know more about any given subject than their teacher. At this point, the role of educator may need to change to facilitator or coach.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/Midnight UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

What to Expect When You’re Expected to Teach Gifted Students: A Guide to the Celebrations, Surprises, Quirks, and Questions in Your First Year Teaching Gifted Learners (book)

What to Expect When You’re Expected to Teach Gifted Students (Vimeo 50:35)

Teacher’s Survival Guide: Gifted Education: A First-Year Teacher’s Introduction to Gifted Learners 2nd Edition (book)

Gifted Education and Gifted Students: A Guide for Inservice and Preservice Teachers

Best Practices in Gifted Education: An Evidence-Based Guide

A Field Guide to Gifted Students: A Teacher’s Introduction to Identifying and Meeting the Needs of Gifted Learners

A Field Guide to Gifted Students: Identifying and Meeting the Needs of Gifted Learners (Vimeo 59:43)

Six Strategies for Challenging Gifted Learners

Handbook of Giftedness in Children: Psychoeducational Theory, Research, and Best Practices (book)

Critical Issues and Practices in Gifted Education: What the Research Says 2nd Edition

Gifted Education 101: The Basics (pdf)

‘Twice Exceptional’ Students Miss Out on Gifted Classes

Even Gifted Educators Say Their Classes Don’t Reach All Who Need Them

Best Practices for Gifted Programming and Services

Building a Successful Gifted Program

A Strategy for Overcoming Equity Issues in Gifted Programs

Research on Giftedness and Gifted Education: Status of the Field and Considerations for the Future

Enhancing Gifted Education for Underrepresented Students: Promising Recruitment and Programming Strategies

Gifted/Talented Education (pdf)

Resources for Educators

Tips for Teachers: Successful Strategies for Teaching Gifted Learners

8 Essential Tips & Resources for Educators of Gifted Kids

Practical Recommendations and Interventions: Gifted Students (pdf)

Current Practices in the Education of Gifted and Advanced Learners in South Australian Schools | Australasian Journal of Gifted Education

Image courtesy of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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