Category Archives: curriculum

Reenvisioning Education through Hybrid Learning

 

This week at #gtchat we looked at hybrid learning, how it differs from blended learning and the benefits for GT students. Blended learning has traditionally been championed in the K12 learning environment balancing in class, face to face learning with online learning within a particular class. Hybrid learning, a more nuanced form of blended learning, was previously developed and used in collegiate settings. Hybrid learning is multi-faceted. It combines traditional classroom experiences with online classes and experiential learning in a refined way to meet the individual needs of students. Hybrid learning is tantamount to every gifted advocate’s dream of what educating a GT student should look like … individualized programs that address very specific needs while providing all learners an appropriate education.

How can hybrid learning address educational needs in the era of #COVID19? It has become apparent that ‘going’ to school will look a whole lot different in the upcoming school year, regardless of where you live, than in previous years. And, this change may well be in place for some time. Lessons learned at the university level can serve the K12 community well … individualized response to students needs with varying degrees of face to face time, learning through experience as well as distance learning. Hybrid learning will need to evolve; to become more flexible and all stakeholders will need respond will equal flexibility. The foe is no longer an entity or person … the school board, the classroom teacher, the parent … but a virus.

What facets of hybrid learning are best for f2f & which are best for online options? Face to face interaction is best served in traditional classrooms which foster socialization, discussing expectations and responsibilities, demonstrating skills and providing feedback. Face to face interaction is also a plus for experiential learning such as job shadowing, mentoring, internships, and research projects. Online learning can enhance group work through collaboration with intellectual peers, provide opportunity for reflection and critical analysis as well as for self-paced learning and self-assessment. It is an excellent way to serve the needs of rural learners by providing access to high quality instruction and resources not readily available to this population of students.

Assessments of hybrid learning must be grounded in best practices and reflect the individual needs of the learner. Daily interactions can reinforce positive behaviors and help shape both content and course objectives. Assessments may be summative such as projects or portfolios. They can be formative such as discussions (in class and online) or traditional homework assignments when attendance is unpredictable. By using assessment tools to gather data, the resulting analytics provide information about how well students are retaining what they learn and when mastery occurs in all aspects of hybrid learning.

Regardless what approach school districts take to providing education in the era of #COVID19, it is going to profoundly challenge parents in all aspects of their lives. The learning curve will be steep. The initial response to the onset of #COVID19 was sudden and somewhat unpredictable, but few realized the extent and duration of the response which was going to be needed. Reality is forcing uncomfortable decisions. It’s doubtful that most schools and institutions will fully grasp the consequences or be able to provide perfect solutions for all stakeholders. There will need to be cooperation from employers, caregivers, and all education providers.

Hybrid learning can meet many of our current needs. It takes time to design and implement quality programs. Utilizing readily available resources is key to streamlining the planning process. Above all, we must realize that this is a new and difficult time for everyone involved.  Its important to anticipate problems and have a responsive action plan ready; be willing to ask for student feedback and then manage student expectations. Hybrid learning may be beneficial for the times in which we live, but may well prove to be the future of education we needed … a silver lining to a terrible situation.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

What is Hybrid Learning? How to Implement a Hybrid eLearning Strategy

Fast Forward: Hybrid Models Could Prove Effective. Are they here to stay?

NC: State Board of Education Sets Requirements for 2020-21 Remote Instruction Plans

Edutopia: Answers to Your Blended Learning Questions

An Introduction to Hybrid Teaching (pdf)

Moving to a Hybrid Learning Model

State Board of Education Sets Requirements for 2020-21 Remote Instruction Plans

What Is the Difference Between Hybrid and Blended Learning?

Microsoft: Reimagining Education: From Remote to Hybrid Learning

What Will Return to School Look Like This Fall? A Look Inside Hybrid Learning Plans

What is Hybrid Learning? Here’s Everything You Need to Know

Wired: When Schools Reopen, Don’t Ditch Online Learning

Toward a Hybrid Learning System Post COVID-19

The New Fall Look for School: A Hybrid Learning Environment

Investigating Students’ Engagement in a Hybrid Learning Environment

Brownsville ISD to Provide Hybrid Learning Options for Students in Upcoming School Year

Dallas ISD May Adopt Hybrid Learning Plan, Build New School Campus Devoted to Partial At-Home Learning

K-12 Students in Indiana Likely to have ‘Hybrid’ Experience Next School Year

IL: District 150 Looking at Childcare Solutions Due to Hybrid Learning

Plano ISD, Collin College Announce Possibility of ‘Hybrid’ Learning

Florida & Miami-Dade Public Schools Preparing Hybrid/Blended Learning Models

‘Hybrid Learning’ to Be New Normal as California Schools Reopen

 

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

Raising Digitally Savvy Kids

 

Media literate means to be adept at accessing media and to effectively use digital technologies to be participants in society. Media literate children are able to think critically about what they see and read as well as have positive interaction with digital technology. Tech savvy students can consume digital content and create literate media as a result of being media literate.

How do you teach kids to build digital media skills? When children are young, adult supervision is critical. Watching media with a child is a good start, but also discussing with them what they are viewing. It is important to discuss with students how they are using social media and how to recognize the fact that media design is advertising-driven. One of the best ways to build digital media skills is through creation and then sharing of media.

How can parents teach kids to balance tech and real life responsibilities? As adult role models, parents (and teachers) need to be cognizant of their own media consumption and consider when they choose tech over real life interactions. Parents should set clear limits (especially for younger children) regarding the amount of time spent engaged with tech and what media is being consumed. Parents can create a schedule prioritizing school work and play; and then providing opportunities for family time (meals together, family game night, outdoor activities).

How should parents approach teens about responsible tech/media use? The teen years are when identities are formed and are marked with experimentation in many areas; tech use included. It is a time when they begin to be exposed to adult experiences. Teens often hold little regard for parental (or adult) control. Rather, parents should see their role as an advisor setting reasonable limits. Parents can extend conversations about their own online experiences and stay informed about what is happening on all social media platforms.

With the current state of learning both at home and school, it’s more important than ever for schools to incorporate digital literacy into the curriculum. Organizations such as Common Sense Media offer MS/HS curriculum. Students should be taught to corroborate and verify any information they find online through the use of lateral reading (verify as you read). It is also important to teach students to continually question what they read and hear and teachers can facilitate those discussions in the classroom or video classroom.

What strategies can be used to teach children to think critically when using tech? Parents and teachers can look for teachable moments such as a child’s first encounter with a stranger online. Relate online situations to real life ones. Parents could take a family photo and then discuss the appropriateness of sharing it online; the discussion could extend to understanding digital security and how algorithms work for information sharing. Critical thinking must extend beyond the content to how the tech is being used; seeking a purposeful use of the media they consume.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

5 Ways to Raise Tech-Savvy Kids (& Responsible!)

How to Raise Media-Savvy Kids in the Digital Age

The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (book)

Screen Time: How Electronic Media–From Baby Videos to Educational Software–Affects Your Young Child (book 2012)

Digital Literacy: Raising Tech and Media Savvy Kids

Critical Media Project (website)

How to Raise Digitally Savvy Kids

Educating and Empowering Digital Citizens (website)

Digital Learning Projects for Tech Savvy Kids (2020)

How to Raise Digital Savvy Children in a Digital World

Tips for Parents on Raising Privacy-Savvy Kids (pdf)

8 Classroom Edtech Strategies That Develop Critical Thinking Skills

How to Use Technology to Foster Higher-thinking Skills in Class

Using Technology to Develop Students’ Critical Thinking Skills

Cybraryman’s Digital Literacy Page

Cybraryman’s Media Literacy Page

Zapatopi (website)

Dark Patterns (website)

Image courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

A Summer of Opportunities

 

With so much upheaval in our world, we that it might be a good time to chat about all the opportunities available this summer.  How can we make the upcoming months teachable moments – critical thinking about the spread of the virus, empathy, grace towards others? Every single person involved in education has experienced some level of trauma. Consideration of others will be of the upmost important when schools resume. Simply because schools reopen should not imply that the risks from the spread of coronavirus have been eliminated. Class instruction and discussion should take this into account.

A lot has been said about re-imagining education. This may be the time to advocate for best practices in gifted education – such as, acceleration and mastery-based learning. Many schools are now planning to resume in person classes this summer as well as online options for students who prefer to wait. Most experts seem to agree that outdoor summer activities such as day camps are viable options for students.

If we have learned nothing else, it is that schools are so much more than simply an institution for delivering instruction. For many students, it is a place of shelter, a source of nourishment, and where children develop social skills. Schools must work to provide students with a clean, anti-viral atmosphere where they feel safe to return to.  The summer months will be a time for significant planning to ensure that teachers & staff are prepared to meet the trauma-induced needs of returning students.

How can educators use their summer break to personally prepare for a return to school? After so much time out of the classroom, the summer break can be a time to prepare for the unforeseen. Although schools may resume in coming months, classes could be suspended just as quickly as they did in the spring. This summer, most professional development opportunities are being offered online. This eliminates costly travel and related expenses making it a great option for expanded learning.

How can parents best use (non-academic) the summer months while respecting the presence of #COVID19? Most parents have had to suddenly become surrogate teachers over the past few months and summer may be a time to get reacquainted with summertime parenting. With so many under quarantine for many months, the upcoming summer months should include time outside and time for play while certainly respecting the presence of the coronavirus.

With so many impending changes to how we educate our children, this summer needs to involve some form of professional development with specific consideration of safety procedures for both students and teachers. This summer, all of us should be open to the possibility of significant changes and how we’ll adapt when schools eventually reopen.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

TX: Pasadena ISD Summer School Expected to be Busy Because Of Pandemic

TX: Pasadena ISD Summer Information for ECHS (Early College High School) Class of 2024

NAGC: At-Home Summer Fun for Creative Kids & Families for June 2020 (pdf)

NAGC: Beyond School Walls: What Parents Can Do to Widen the Horizons of Their Gifted Learners (pdf)

NAGC: Getting Gifted Kids Outdoors – Tips for a Summer of Play (pdf)

NAGC: Summertime and the Livin’ is Easy (pdf)

Summer Institute for the Gifted 2020

NuMinds Enrichment: Camp Pursuit 2020

Michigan State University Gifted and Talented Education Summer Programs 2020 – Live Online (Apply by 6/15)

Northwestern University: Center for Talent Development Online Summer Programs 2020

Columbia University Teachers College: Summer Certification

Texas Wildlife Association Youth On-Demand Webinars

NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative (Digital Badging)

Rodriguez Resources GT (Google Docs)

Summer Writing Residency Online

Depth and Complexity RULES Webinar Series

National Inventors Hall of Fame Summer Programs 2020

Turning Challenges into Opportunities with Open Educational Resources

MENSA: At-home Learning Resources for Kids

PAGE: Gifted and Talented Resources

MO: Springfield Public Schools Announces In-Person Classes for July’s Session of Explore

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

The Future of Education after the Pandemic

 

This week at #gtchat, we were joined by guests, Jessica Torres and Andi McNair to discuss the future of education after COVID19. No one knows exactly when schools will reopen, but most are working on plans to do so safely and as soon as possible.

Public health including physical and mental health issues will need to be addressed if school reopenings are to be successful. Parents, students, teachers & staff need to feel school environments are safe to reenter. Consideration of health & hygiene measures must include widespread testing, vigilance regarding student and staff health (stay home when sick), wearing masks, frequent hand washing/sanitization, and physical distancing. Mental health considerations must be taken seriously upon reopening. Students and teachers experienced the trauma of sudden closings, lack of closure of previous school year, and some may have faced personal loss due to COVID19.

Returning to school will be traumatic for most students. Apprehension of socializing with friends & teachers, worry about coronavirus, and uncertainty about the future will all play a role in how they adjust to a new normal. School counselors and teachers may have to deal with students returning to school from home environments that were less than ideal. Open and frank conversations will need to take place with students. School activities will necessarily change in the near term and it will be a difficult transition for many students – limited or no sports, band, dances, performances, field trips, recess, PE classes, or being to interact with friends.

Instructional concerns will be tantamount to summer slide on steroids for many students who normally need extra supports, lacked access to tech to continue learning outside school, or who were personally affected by COVID19. All students will need a modicum of grace. It will take time to assess where a student is at academically, the need for remediation or grade acceleration, and to plan for inevitable return to social isolation due to virus resurges. Teachers will need to pre-assess, vertically align standards between grades, compact the curriculum, consider using IEPs for all students, and utilize differentiation. Schools may need to add after school programs for remediation.

We will address specific goals for gifted education next week, but we all need to consider this crisis as an opportunity to rethink the possibilities of improving education rather than just returning to the status quo. In recent years, ideas such as Andi’s genius hour, flipped classrooms, global classroom virtual connections, PBL, and competency-based learning have all been on the front-burners for educators. It is inevitable that blended learning will need to be increasingly used to meet the needs of all learners; especially during the next few years until a resolution is found to disruption of education due to coronavirus.

How can schools work to more powerfully engage their parents in the educational process? Parents are now co-teachers in the era of #COVID19. Communication is more important than ever. Schools need to educate parents on how to educate their children during school outages. Parents should be considered team members. They will need to be assured that their children are safe on school campuses, educational goals are in place for their child to be successful & be made aware of contingency plans for reoccurring school-at-home situations.

What will be the most significant change to K-12 schools in the next year? K-12 schools will need to rely on robust data and learning management systems to improve educational continuity. Secure & reliable video-conferencing systems will be essential. (Getting Smart) Schools will be re-imagined through collaboration with students (student voice), flexibility of hybrid learning, innovation in information sharing, and re-configuring class size as well as classroom logistics.

A transcript of the chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

A New Normal in Education Instructional Implications after #COVID19 (Webinar 57:45)

Forging a Path Forward How to Design a Responsive Return Plan (pdf)

School Leaders Debate Solutions for an Uncertain 2020-21

American Academy of Pediatrics: COVID-19 Planning Considerations: Return to In-person Education in Schools

AAP Guidance on School Reopening Addresses Physical and Mental Health, Instructional Time

9 Ways Schools Will Look Different When (And If) They Reopen

How to Reopen Schools: A 10-Point Plan Putting Equity at the Center

What Comes Next for Public Schooling

A Few Schools Reopen, But Remote Learning Could Go on for Years in U.S.

AFT Launches Landmark Plan to Safely Reopen America’s Schools and Communities

A Blueprint for Back to School

Searching for the Other Side of the Tunnel: Leading through #COVID-19

Survey: Teachers Favor Moving on to Next Year’s Content in the Fall

It’s Time to Accept that the Point of School Has Changed

Teaching and Learning after COVID-19

What Lessons from the Coronavirus Pandemic will Shape the Future of Education?

The COVID-19 Pandemic has Changed Education Forever – This is How

Ed Week: COVID-19: Report Offers ‘Blueprint’ for Reopening Schools and Beyond

S.C. Educators Considers Safest Way for Kids to Return to School in Summer, Fall

After The Crisis Half-Time High School May Be Just What Students Need (subscription req’d)

Cybraryman’s The New Normal Pages

There’s Always Next Year: 3 Ideas to Recover Lost Educational Opportunities Post-Coronavirus Epidemic

The Coming Mental-Health Crisis

A Perfect Time to End Our STEM Obsession: 3 Ideas for Teaching Critical Thinking At Home during (And After) The Coronavirus Pandemic

The Case for Critical Thinking: The COVID-19 Pandemic And an Urgent Call To Close The Critical Thinking Gap In Education

Virtual Reality Classrooms (YouTube 1:54)

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Photos courtesy of Jessica Torres and Andi McNair.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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