Monthly Archives: November 2015

High Costs of Raising Gifted Children

gtchat 11202015 High Cost Gifted Children

Raising children today is an expensive proposition for any parent; but, perhaps even more so for parents of children identified as gifted. At this week’s chat, we discussed primarily economic factors; but many people expressed concerns related to social and emotional costs. It was noted that this as well as several other related topics will have to be considered in upcoming chats.

One of the first expenses encountered by parents can be that of out-of-school testing; either to dispute in-school testing or to provide testing that the school is unwilling to do for a wide variety of reasons. Testing may include both intelligence testing, mental health testing; etc. Also, it often needs to be repeated if initially done early, when the child enters the teen years. Financially, testing can cost thousands of dollars and involve travel expenses to distant testing facilities. These costs can be out of reach for many families.

When advocacy fails resulting in a gifted child not receiving an appropriate education, many parents turn to homeschooling, charter schools, private schools or residential schools. There are some schools for the profoundly gifted in the U.S. which are free or low-cost, but available seats are few and far between. Again, these options are not feasible for all parents.

Homeschoolers often must provide their own curriculum and with gifted children this can mean buying multiple years’ worth of materials every year. Add to this loss of income for a parent provider, extracurricular activities, online classes; and you can see how quickly expenses can add up. Private and charter schools can mean added transportation costs.

Parents of gifted children are always looking for ways to enrich and supplement their child’s education regardless of where they attend school. These costs can include summer camps, online coursework, tutoring, additional reading materials, and educational games/toys.

The chat then turned to the question of costs associated with Early College. A form of acceleration, there are costs of which many people were not aware. Besides the fact that college expenses can come years earlier than anticipated; there are issues pertaining to differences in the awarding of scholarships (merit scholarships are rarely offered to a transfer student), qualifying for financial aid, and loss of child support in the case of divorce. Age-related costs include transportation costs (student not old enough to drive), participation in field trips and college abroad programs (parents generally need to accompany student), work-study (student not old enough to work), and even using campus health centers.

The costs of providing for the many needs of a gifted child do come with a price tag, and  it often can be very high. Although gifted children may be more expensive to raise than their age peers, #gtchat has provided links below to articles with practical advice on how to mitigate those expenses and find the best solutions to finding appropriate educational and enrichment opportunities for your child. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 13.00 NZDT/11.00 AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

The Hidden Costs of Having a Gifted Child

How Do You Raise a Prodigy?

Additional Child Support for Extraordinary Expenses in New Jersey

An Accelerated Journey

How Much Does It Cost to Raise a Child Prodigy?

The Cost of Raising a Gifted Child (Video 21:41)

It Pays to Have a Smart Child, but It Can Cost, Too

Olympians’ Parents Pay the Cost of Achieving Gold

Gifted Children: Myths & Realities (Amazon)

17 Wishes for Making Parenting Gifted Easier

How Much Does It Cost to Raise a Child Star?

What Can Child Support Be Used For?

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

“How Cardboard Can Spark Creativity” with guest moderator, Krissy Venosdale

gtchat 11132015 Cardboard

Many thanks to Krissy Venosdale @Venspired for moderating our recent chat on “How Cardboard Can Spark Creativity” while our moderator was at a conference. Below, please find links to resources on finding and using cardboard for the classroom, homeschool, and home.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 13.00 NZDT/11.00 AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Google Cardboard

Link to Venspired Cardboard Poster

“It’s Not About the Space… All Learning”

Caine’s Arcade 2: From a Movie to a Movement (YouTube 8:20)

Imagination Foundation: Global Cardboard Challenge 2015

Make Do

Constructing with Cardboard

Building with Cardboard

Cardboard Construction (Prezi)

How to Work with Cardboard

Wheatpaste Tutorial

Paper Crafty: 12 Cardboard Artists Think Outside the Box

Trashformation: Furniture & Shelter from Recycled Cardboard (YouTube 7:55)

Flexible Folding Chair (YouTube 1:36)

 

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Photo courtesy of Flickr    CC BY 2.0

2014 – 2015 State of the States in Gifted Education

gtchat 11112015 NAGC State of States

In collaboration with the National Association for Gifted Children, Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented debuted the new 2014 – 2015 State of the States (SOS) of Gifted Education report found here (pdf); an extensive review of gifted education policy in the U.S. Our guest was René Islas, Executive Director of the NAGC. We were also pleased to have Dr. George Betts, president of the NAGC, and many of the Board of Directors join us as well.

In a press release, the NAGC characterized the findings of the SOS report as, “Despite some modest gains in how states serve high-ability students and fund such programs, a new report shows that a lack of transparency and consistency in laws, policies, and funding to support these students with extraordinary gifts and talents continue to vary sharply among the states.” Furthermore, “28 states lack even a single gifted education performance indicator on their annual report cards or other accountability measure. 19 states fail to monitor local district programs in this area, 16 do not require districts to submit reports and only 11 produce an annual report on the performance of these students.” Perhaps the most stunning fact to be revealed by the report was, “Only 1 state (Nevada) statutorily requires all teachers to receive training in gifted and talented education through a separate course before beginning their classroom service.”

“We need to change this reality by requiring states and districts to report on the key indicators of our high-achieving students, just as we have long required similar reporting for those students on the lower end of the achievement spectrum,” said Dr. George Betts, President of the NAGC Board. 

The need for such a report is obvious to those in the gifted community. As Michelle Swain, School Administrator in Texas and NAGC Board Member, pointed out, “We can replicate best practices when we see them successfully implemented in other states. Why reinvent the wheel?” Dr. Brian Housand, Associate Professor and NAGC Board Member, positioned the report as a means for collaboration, “Gifted educators should not live in silos. We have to find ways to collaborate across states and around the world.”

The State of the States report includes data on policies, funding, practice, and participation in gifted programs. It also gives details on state policies that can be used to check school district’s practices which affect gifted students including teacher training requirements, funding, and accountability. This valuable information can make all the difference when advocating for gifted students. For this reason as Dr. Joy Davis, Associate Professor and NAGC Board Member, said, “Wide distribution of the report is imperative.” Dr. Jonathan Plucker, Professor and NAGC Board Member, added, “We need to identify ways to help advocates in each state as they work to expand and improve services.”

gtchat State of States graphic

Tracy Weinberg of TAGT pointed out, “TAGT has made progress in Texas, reinstating some accountability for gifted services that is reported publicly. [However, it is] important to note that while services are mandated, there are over 1000 school districts in Texas, so services can vary widely.”

Although progress has been slow, many expressed the belief that gifted education is headed in the right direction and initiatives such as the State of the States report from the NAGC are helping to drive the change. Rene Islas shared, “One very positive change is that the state of Washington has adopted a mandate to identify and serve gifted students.” Dr. Brian Housand summed it up, “There’s no shortage of work to be done in gifted education. We must stay committed to serving gifted kids 24/7; get and stay involved.” A transcript of the chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 13.00 NZDT/11.00 AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Turning A Blind Eye: Neglecting Needs of GT – Limited Accountability/Oversight/Reporting (pdf)

The Nation’s Report Card: NAEP Results

Gifted by State

State Affiliate Resource Center

Using Research to Inform Advocacy Efforts (pdf)

Schools for Advanced Students at Universities and Gifted Centers (pdf)

University and Center Services for Parents and Families of Advanced K-12 Students (pdf)

Programs for Advanced K-12 Students at Universities and Centers (pdf)

The Nation’s Report Card

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad and the NAGC.

Setting Boundaries for Gifted Siblings

gtchat 11062015 Gifted Siblings

 

Setting boundaries for gifted children proved to be almost as difficult to chat about as it is for parents to do. Admittedly, raising gifted siblings brings unique challenges for parents, the children themselves and for the entire family. Many abilities, unequal abilities and asynchronous development within the same family can be overwhelming.

Parenting become a balancing act in an attempt to ensure fairness in how they respond to the needs of each family member. All children need to feel valued regardless of ability. Gifted rivalry is not accidental; realizing intentions and counseling siblings is an important parental responsibility. It can extend to the selection of colleges, participation in academic competitions and affect acceleration decisions.

How does one build positive and cooperative relationships in a family? Parents can value their child’s point of view as a way to encourage cooperation. Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources told us, “[It’s] necessary to balance opportunities offered and time spent with each and encourage them to value each other – not always easy.”

Parents need to value the strengths and weaknesses of each child while acknowledging differences. They must have a clear vision of the goals they wish to set for their children and then allow the child to set ‘some’ of their own boundaries. Acting as a role model for setting personal limits is a way to gain the respect of a gifted child. Involve children in family decisions and learn to be flexible over time. A transcript of the chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 13.00 NZDT/11.00 AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

One of Us has to be Smart Enough to Apologize

Perhaps the Issue can be Resolved with Defining Boundaries

A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (Amazon)

Who’s in Charge Here, Anyway? Delicate Balance of Boundaries with the Gifted

Siblings, Giftedness & Disparities – Oh My!

Like Minds: Similarities and Differences in Intellectual Ability in Gifted Siblings (pdf)

Congrats, Your Kid is Gifted…But What About Her Sibling?

Siblings – Gifted or Not?

A Gifted Child Increases Sibling Rivalry, Study Finds

Gifted Siblings

Gifted & Non-gifted Siblings: How Conventional Wisdom is Wrong

When One Sibling is More “Gifted” Than the Other

12 Anxiety Issues Parents of Gifted Children Face

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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