Category Archives: Gifted Adults

Perspectives on Giftedness

For decades, educators, academics, professionals in the field, parents and even those identified as gifted have tried to define the term ‘gifted’ with few reaching consensus. Today’s chat will explore different perspectives about giftedness. The terms educationally and psychologically gifted are terms used by some to distinguish between individuals with different needs in school. Other terms frequently used include high achievers or profoundly gifted. 2Es or twice exceptional students are labeled ‘gifted’, but also experience learning challenges. It’s important to consider a student’s strengths and address those before deficits.

What does it mean to be ‘more’ regarding gifted children and why does it matter? When the idea of ‘more’ is introduced in discussing gifted children, concerns about behavior are generally the issue. The source or reason for intense behaviors is debatable in academic circles, but rarely for parents. It is important to recognize and address out of the ordinary behaviors of a child who is identified as gifted to ensure their well-being as well as their ability to achieve academically and gain important social skills to be successful in life. In recent years, the importance of SEL or social-emotional learning has gained recognition among educators and parents. For GT kids, the assumption was that they would be fine on their own. This is no longer the case.

What challenges do twice-exceptional students face at school and in life? Initially, recognition of the existence of twice-exceptional students is paramount to providing appropriate educational opportunities. Failure to do so can result in students receiving only remedial services. Twice-exceptional students are often misunderstood both in school and by society at large. Challenging behaviors or academic deficits can result in students being misplaced in special education rather than placement in gifted programs. Inappropriate placement in school can lead to life-long consequences for twice-exceptional students whose most urgent needs are never met. It can have disastrous effects on life and career outcomes.

Pathologizing a gifted child’s behavior – labeling normal behavior as abnormal – is like trying to fix a problem which does not exist. Interventions, inappropriate treatments and even drug therapy can do more harm than good. For parents, in particular, it is extremely important to engage with professionals who have qualified experience working with gifted children. Pathologizing gifted behaviors may result in misdiagnosis which can lead to unmet needs or even more serious problems for their child.

Parents may wonder if they should tell their child they have been identified as gifted. However, its important to explain giftedness before they learn about it from unqualified sources or form their own opinions based on misinformation. Gifted children need to understand that they are more than a label assigned to them in order to receive services at school. That understanding involves realizing they are not better than, but rather better at. Understanding the nature of giftedness will help a gifted child to realize it’s okay to make mistakes or even fail at times; it’s not an excuse for poor behavior; and they may view the world around them differently than their age peers.

What does giftedness look like in adulthood? Gifted adults may or may not recognize their own giftedness based on their individual life experiences. Unfortunately, there is a tendency to only view eminent or high achieving adults as ever being gifted. Psychologists’ offices are filled with gifted adults experiencing anxiety, intense emotions, perfectionism, an acute sense of loneliness due to an inability to connect with others, existential depression, and so much ‘more’.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10AM AEST/1AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

The Columbus Group Conference | Gifted Parenting Support

Gifted Myths: An Easy-to-Read Guide to Myths on the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional (book)

Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling

If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice Exceptional

Your Rainforest Mind: A Guide to the Well-Being of Gifted Adults and Youth

Behavioral Profiles of Clinically Referred Children with Intellectual Giftedness | BioMed Research International

Homeschooling Gifted Students: Considerations for Research and Practice (pdf) | IGI Global

Dwelling on the Right Side of the Curve: An Exploration of the Psychological Wellbeing of Parents of Gifted Children (pdf)

New Brain Mapping Technique Highlights Relationship Between Connectivity and IQ | Neuroscience News

“Choosing our Histories” by Kevin Gover, Baccalaureate Address 2016 | Brown University

The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star (book)

Bright Adults: Uniqueness and Belonging across the Lifespan (book)

Comparison of Cognitive, Psychosocial, and Adaptive Behavior Profiles among Gifted Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

Gifted … You Know What That Means, Right?

When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social and Emotional Needs (book)

Serving Highly & Profoundly Gifted Learners (pdf)

Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth | Vanderbilt University

Behavioral Profiles of Clinically Referred Children with Intellectual Giftedness | Biomed Research International

Images courtesy of GHF Learners, Celi Trepanier, Dr. Gail Post, Stacie Brown McCullough, and Paula Prober.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

The Gifted Introvert

It’s no surprise that we would chat about introverts at #gtchat! Some characteristics of introverts include preferring to work on their own rather than in large groups; may have limited, but deep interests; and need time alone to recharge. Introverts may exhibit deep concentration and appear absorbed in their thoughts; are reserved, deliberate and prefer one-on-one communication; and can become irritated when they don’t have enough ‘alone time’. Introverts form strong (but few) relationships, are generally self-sufficient, self-actualizing, and high achievers.

There are many misconceptions about those who are introverts; it is a choice, it can be ‘fixed’, it is simply being shy. Introverts may appear bored, but are simply deep in thought. They may seem socially awkward, but are not interested in their surroundings. Others may view introverts as judgmental when they have no opinion about the situation or person.

What is the relationship between giftedness and being introverted? Gifted individuals can be introverts or extroverts. Some research suggests a higher proportion of the gifted population is introverted. (Gallagher, 1990; Hoehn & Birely, 1988)  Being identified as gifted and possibly being introverted is a relationship; the characteristics of thoughtfulness, introspection, deliberateness, reflection, hard work, and confidence compliment gifted individuals. Gifted introverts tend to think before they speak, consider who they are speaking to first, do not crave attention, ‘enjoy’ time alone, prefer quality rather than numerous friendships, and pay attention to others.

Gifted introverts tend to think before they speak, consider who they are speaking to first, do not crave attention, ‘enjoy’ time alone, prefer quality rather than numerous friendships, and pay attention to others. Strategies which support introverted students include allowing thinking time, flexible seating, providing personal space, allow students to work in small groups or pairs, or consider interest-based assignments. Additional strategies can include providing opportunities for self-paced learning, independent study, the option to provide responses in writing, or encourage self-reflection.

What strategies can teachers use for online learning for introverted students? It might seem that online learning would be ideal for introverted students, but this is not always the case. Being on ZOOM or Teams all day long may be just as overwhelming. Zoom fatigue can be a real problem. When introverted students are confronted with technical issues and disruptions in Internet connections can add to their anxiety. Teachers can allow for additional breaks for introverted students, permit students to be on mute during discussions, or allow them to turn off their cameras while online.

Parenting an introvert requires understanding that they aren’t going to change, need their personal space and quiet time (especially after a long day at school), and does not need to have a lot of friends to be happy. An introverted gifted child needs opportunities to extend learning beyond the classroom, work on projects of interest, and to make friends on their own terms.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/Midnight UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Companion Website to Susan Cain’s Book Quiet

The Quiet Personality Test (Sign-up required)

Introvert, Dear (Online Community of Introverts)  

Go Away; I’m Introverting

Introverts, Extroverts, and Social Distancing

The Anxieties of Introversion

Understanding the Gifted Introvert

Introversion: The Often Forgotten Factor Impacting the Gifted (pdf) | Center for Gifted Education – College of William and Mary

High Ability: The Gifted Introvert

Talent Development Resources: Introversion, Sensitivity, Shyness – Are They the Same?

The Happy Introvert: A Wild and Crazy Guide to Celebrating Your True Self (Kindle)

Make Your Class Cozy for Gifted Introverts

Gifted Introverts and Extroverts

Introvert Social Needs and Preferences

The Overlooked Significant Population – Introverts

Which One Is You?: 4 Types of Introverts and Self-Care Tips to Be Your Own Hero

Living a Quiet Life

Extroverts (and Introverts, too) Face Quarantine Challenges

The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World (book)

Building a Strong Relationship With Your Introverted Child

Here’s What You Need to Know If You’re the Parent of an Introvert

Responding to Introverted and Shy Students: Best Practice Guidelines for Educators and Advisors | Open Journal of Nursing

6 Informal Assessments to Engage Introverted Students: Creating Accessible Classrooms for Introverted Students, Online or In Person

5 Ways Virtual Classrooms Help Introverts

Teaching Introverted Students: A Guide for Educators and Parents

How to Understand and Work with Introverted Students

Introverts Aren’t Actually Better at Social Distancing

Chat: The Introvert’s Secret Remote Weapon – Leading by Typing during the Pandemic

Cybraryman’s Introverted Students Page

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Coping with Isolation and Social Distancing

What unique social-emotional challenges are GT students facing during the pandemic? Many GT students are extremely cognizant of and understand the consequences of the pandemic; even at a very young age. Adults need to recognize that they may respond with high levels of anxiety. GT students often have parents and family members who are frontline workers … doctors, teachers, medical professionals … and will be very aware of how COVID19 can affect their health and family finances. Their concerns will include worries about availability of AP/IB classes online, getting into college, attending classes remotely away from friends and intellectual peers, and catching the virus themselves.  

There are strategies which can lessen the effects of remote learning for 2E (twice exceptional) students. Parents of twice-exceptional kids may feel their children are especially affected by the inherent challenges associated with remote learning and need to work closely with teachers to ensure their academic needs are being met. When working with twice-exceptional students remotely, provide them with a visual schedule and be aware of those activities they may already find challenging. Teachers should be sure to follow applicable IEP modifications. Teachers and parents can work together to facilitate learning; such as, using two separate browsers for school and for personal use. Teachers can also provide visual cues while engaging in verbal online instruction.

Maintaining a relationship with colleagues is essential in providing quality education to their students. Planning sessions that were ongoing prior to the pandemic should continue online.  It’s important to maintain a sense of community through daily check-ins, informal sharing sessions, validating concerns, and making a plan on dealing with those concerns.  Teachers can connect in-person with proper social distancing, wearing masks, health checks, and health screenings if necessary. They can also make phone calls, email, and hold virtual meetings via online platforms like Zoom.

During remote learning, schools can partner with families to raise awareness about good mental health. Taking care of physical needs such as food, housing, internet and personal device availability, and access to counseling; serve as a starting point. It is important to recognize when a child expresses feelings of fear of catching the virus, being anxious about the health of a loved one, or sadness from missing friends and family members. Schools can offer online counseling via school personnel, promote social connectedness, encourage parents to seek help if needed and where to find it, and support students in identifying and managing emotions.  

Parents can help their children cope with the uncertainty of the pandemic by being honest about coronavirus, validating fears and offering ways to cope with them, and providing opportunities for children to connect with friends and family online.  They can engage in creative play and activities to address concerns about day to day life; such as, drawing pictures about ways to be safe via masking, hand washing and social distancing. Parents can focus on the positive. Celebrate the time they have been given to spend with their children that might not have occurred before the pandemic.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 1PM NZDT/11 AM AEDT/Midnight UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Using Video to Maintain the Human Connection during the COVID-19 School Closures

Staying Away: The Psychological Impact of Social Distancing

Parenting in a Pandemic: Tips to Keep the Calm at Home | American Academy of Pediatrics

Beyond Reopening Schools: How Education can Emerge Stronger than before COVID-19

Take this Pandemic Moment to Improve Education | EdSource

The Impact of COVID-19 on Education: Insights from Education at a Glance 2020 (pdf) | OECD  

A Paradox of Social Distancing for SARS-CoV-2: Loneliness and Heightened Immunological Risk | Molecular Psychiatry

The Coronavirus Pandemic is Creating 2 Major Problems in Education, but There aren’t as Many Downsides as Upsides | Business Insider

TX: Northwest ISD – Health and Safety Protocols

TX: Gifted/Talented Education Guidance for 2020 – 2021 School Year (pdf) | TEA

Arts and Crafts as an Educational Strategy and Coping Mechanism for Republic of Korea and United States Parents during the COVID-19 Pandemic | International Review of Education

Pandemics Can be Stressful | CDC (US)

Parenting in the Age of COVID-19: Coping with Six Common Challenges | Boston’s Children’s Hospital

The Pandemic Is a Family Emergency | The New Republic

COVID-19 & Parenting Challenges | Psychology Today

Children’s Socio-emotional Skills and the Home Environment during the COVID-19 Crisis

Bored, Scared and Confused: A New Poll Shows How COVID-19 Is Affecting Children’s Mental Health, but the News Isn’t All Bad

Coping in Isolation: Predictors of Individual and Household Risks and Resilience Against the COVID-19 Pandemic (Download) | Social Sciences and Humanities Open

A Smile Can Lift the Veil of Social Isolation

The Anxiety Pandemic

Cybraryman’s Mental and Emotional Health Page

Cybraryman’s SEL Page

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Barriers to Women’s Achievement

Barriers for women’s achievement and career advancement are pervasive and pernicious. The belief that the ‘glass ceiling’ has been shattered is itself a barrier. Societal prejudice and stereotypes create ongoing barriers. Career advancement for women is thwarted by a lack of women in the ‘C’ suite and thus a lack of role models who advance to mid-level leadership roles. Qualities associated with leadership mimic male attributes. A long-standing barrier for women exists in a lack of access/entrance to the ‘good ole boys’ network. Networking is crucial in career advancement, but the opportunity to network with peers is lacking for women. Women are often forced with difficult decisions regarding work-life balance when pursuing their career. Limited availability for after-work obligations, travel, or training is reflected in job evaluations.

Impostor Syndrome – not feeling ‘good enough’ – affects how women react to workplace discrimination; how they choose their careers; and how they leave a career (quietly, leaving unresolved issues behind). It starts early for women and can determine what classes they take in high school and college. Reduced confidence can become a self-fulfilling effect in their lives. Internalizing, rationalizing, and avoidance of barriers reduce their chance of career advancement.

What can companies do to develop female talent within their organizations? Companies need to acknowledge ‘Second-Generation Gender Bias’ – a bias which creates an environment reflective of the values of men in the workplace, but includes subtle discrimination against women. Female talent development needs to recognize ability, ensure equitable professional development, provide access to peer-networking opportunities, and afford women affirmation through the creation of leadership identity. It is enhanced when more women are placed in leadership roles. This counters a male-oriented work culture that only values gender-based qualities and maintains the status quo.

There are many things women can do to promote gender equity including promoting discussion of gender bias in their workplace. They can be positive role models for and mentors to their female co-workers. And, self-advocacy is so important, as well. Women can build communities of support within companies where they feel safe to give candid feedback, discuss sensitive topics, and provide emotional support for each other.

Gender inequity starts early and continues throughout a woman’s life. Education of all stakeholders can make a real difference for women in the workplace. Women excel at all levels of education; grades; participation in GT programs, AP classes; and graduation rates. Yet, fail to rise to the highest levels in the corporate/academic world. Women at all ages should not be discouraged in seeking careers in male-dominated fields. Educators must acknowledge and address the ‘confidence gap’ that female students increasingly face over time in areas such as math & science. New approaches to education that can improve outcomes for women include design thinking, AI integration, and STEM equity.

There are many things that can ensure gender equity in the future including investing in lifelong learning opportunities, offering flexible work schedules and environments, and encouraging work-life balance. Gender equity in the workplace can be accomplished if companies mandate gender equity, establish a chief diversity officer, consider drawing workers from a broad diverse talent pool, and create open lines of communication.

This week we celebrated 10 YEARS of #gtchat on Twitter and were excited to welcome @DeborahMersino ~ founder and first moderator of Global #gtchat ~ as our guest!

 

Image

 

View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

Sprite’s Site courtesy of Jo Freitag.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Resources:

6 Barriers for Women’s Career Advancement

Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers

Who Will Lead and Who Will Follow? A Social Process of Leadership Identity Construction in Organizations (pdf)

Impossible Selves: Image Strategies and Identity Threat in Professional Women’s Career Transitions (pdf)

Negotiating in the Shadows of Organizations: Gender, Negotiation, and Change (pdf)

Taking Gender into Account: Theory and Design for Women’s Leadership Development Plans (pdf)

Barriers for Women to Positions of Power: How Societal and Corporate Structures, Perceptions of Leadership and Discrimination Restrict Women’s Advancement to Authority

Gender Issues and Achievement

Women are “Bossy” and Men are “Decisive”: What Gender Stereotypes Really Mean in the Workplace and How to Overcome Them

Defining Female Achievement: Gender, Class, and Work in Contemporary Korea (pdf)

Women in the Boardroom A Global Perspective (pdf)

Top 10 Work Force Trends to Watch in the New Decade

The Future of Women at Work: Transitions in the Age of Automation

Women and the Future of Work

Women in C-suite: Navigating Invisible Obstacles

New Study Reveals 6 Barriers Keeping Women from High-Power Networking

Women in the Workplace: A Research Roundup

Girls Get Smart, Boys Get Smug: Historical Changes in Gender Differences in Math, Literacy, and Academic Social Comparison and Achievement

‘Women and Leadership: Defining the Challenges’ in Handbook of Leadership Theory and Practice (book)

Why A Post About Women Downplaying Their Awesomeness Went Viral

Additional Resources:

The Invisible Obstacles for Women

Social Norms as a Barrier to Women’s Employment in Developing Countries (pdf)

Dismantling Perceptions, Attitudes, and Assumptions: Women Leaders are Interested in Advancement

Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men (book)

The Confidence Gap

School Is Not Working for Too Many Boys and Nobody Wants to Talk About It

Feel like a fraud?

Image courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy Lisa Conrad.

Photo courtesy of Deborah Mersino.

Photo courtesy of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented.

Image courtesy of Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources (AUS).

 

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