Monthly Archives: August 2018

Growing Resilient Gifted Kids

gtchat 08092018 Resilience

How do you define ‘resilience’? This week at #gtchat we discussed what resilience means for gifted children. It refers to protective factors which buffer a person’s response to stressful situations or significant life events. Resilience isn’t fixed. It changes due to circumstances over one’s lifespan. It involves optimism (believing in yourself), persistence (in the face of potential failure), and becoming a good problem solver.

Characteristics often common to gifted children and those children considered resilient include task commitment, a desire to learn, and reflectiveness as well as the ability to dream. Common characteristics of gifted children and resilient children may also include self-control, self-awareness or even risk-taking. In recent years, research has shown that high intelligence contributes to greater resilience. (Bonanno 2004)

Resilience plays a role in the life of 2E students. Twice-exceptional students must deal with others’ perceptions of how ability should influence achievement. Failure to meet those expectations can negatively affect 2E students. These students who may be at higher risk not to develop resilience and be successful could counter risk factors with a network of support from caring and nurturing adults.

Teachers can nurture academic resilience in the classroom by providing an environment where students feel safe and respected. They can act as role models for students by keeping emotions in check around students and encouraging positive interpersonal relationships. Teachers can encourage students to read books about courage in the face of adversity.

Parents can build resilience at home by expressing positive attitudes in difficult situations; displaying emotions such as love, gratitude, and hope; and providing a long-term caring relationship with their child. When young children face an untenable situation, parents can brainstorm with them to understand what is happening and how they might develop a plan to overcome the problem. Parents also need to realize the importance of relinquishing control over their child’s life and allow the child to experience ‘agency’ – being able to solve problems on their own; to take control of their own life’s narrative.

How can we integrate mindfulness, gratitude, and empathy into children’s busy lives? Mindfulness, gratitude and empathy are powerful factors in developing resilience in children and adults need to provide the necessary time to allow them to be integrated into their child’s life. Encourage children to express gratitude when good things happen in their lives and empathy for others who may be having experiences which they haven’t had. Resilience trumps failure and adults can serve as role models who exhibit mindfulness, gratitude and empathy in everyday tasks and when responding to the needs of their children.

We encourage you to view the transcript of this chat which can be found at Wakelet. Then, check out the resources below for more information.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Sprite’s Site: Revitalization and Resilience

Sprite’s Site: Best Australian Blogs 2012 Part 6

Sprite’s Site: Surviving the Christmas Season

Teaching Tenacity, Resilience, and a Drive for Excellence: Lessons for Social-Emotional Learning for Grades 4-8 (Prufrock Press November 2018)

Developing Resilience in Gifted Students

“Gifted, Bullied, Resilient: A Brief Guide for Smart Families” with author, Pamela Price

An Overview of Resilience in Gifted Children

How Can I Improve My Gifted Child’s Resilience?

Resilience and Gifted Children

Coping 101: Building Persistence and Resilience in Gifted Children

The Implications of Risk and Resilience Literature for Gifted Students with Learning Disabilities

Enhancing Resilience of Gifted Students (pdf)

AUS: The Social Emotional Well-Being of the Gifted Child and Perceptions of Parent and Teacher Social Support (pdf 2018)

UK: Approaches to Measuring Academic Resilience: A Systematic Review (pdf)

Transforming Outstanding Potential in Outstanding Skills by Using Storytelling to Develop Intellectual Abilities of Gifted Students at Risk

Using Mindfulness-Based Strengths Practices with Gifted Populations (pdf)

Management of Anxiety Begins at Home

Building Resilience

Cybraryman’s Critical Thinking Page

Cybraryman’s Learning from Mistakes Page

Cybraryman’s Coping Strategies Page

Cybraryman’s Social and Emotional Learning Page

Cybraryman’s Risk Taking and Innovation Page

Wikipedia: Four Stages of Competence

AUS: Building Resilience in Children

Nurturing Gratitude in Kids 365 Days a Year

Photo by sydney Rae on Unsplash

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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Improving GT Parent-Teacher Communications

gtchat 08022018 Communications

Unique challenges exist in relationships between GT parents and teachers, and this week on #gtchat we discussed ways to improve how parents and teachers of gifted students communicate with each other. In many situations, gifted-identified students have an education plan which places certain requirements and responsibilities on all parties involved in the agreement. GT students often receive accommodations or interventions which place additional stressors and constraints on the teacher/student/parent relationship.

In a perfect world, good parent-teacher relations most often benefit the student. Depending on their age, a student can explore their potential with the help of a supportive teacher/mentor. Good parent-teacher relationships don’t just happen. They need to be cultivated and maintained in the spirit of mutual respect. A good start is to make sure all stakeholders have a firm grasp of the need for gifted education.

Today there exists a wide range of tech tools and apps to facilitate open communication between parents and teachers. Schools have long acknowledged that open lines of communication can avoid misunderstandings between parents and teachers. Educators and schools, however, must be cognizant of a family’s ability to access technology and take steps to provide access when it doesn’t exist or provide other means of communication.

Face-to-face activities can improve parent-teacher relations. This relationship can be enhanced through participation in extracurricular activities, breakfast/coffee with a teacher/admin opportunity, and even pre-scheduled after school meetings.

What best practices can parents use to improve their child’s education? Parents need to learn the ‘lingo’ used by educators; they will earn the respect of those who are  responsible for making decisions affecting their child. Best practices for parents advocating for their gifted child include researching state and local education laws and diligent planning concerning their child’s educational needs prior to meeting with school personnel.

Parents and teachers many never see eye-to-eye regarding a child’s education plan, but remaining calm, professional and open-minded will serve everyone’s best interests.  When researching a child’s particular school, always be aware of the ‘chain of command’ and follow it precisely. Know who the teacher reports to, but start with the teacher first. Most schools recognize this chain of comment: teacher >>> administrator >>> principal >>> superintendent >>> school board. To learn more about improving parent-teacher communications, you can check out the resources below and read a copy of the transcript from this chat at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Starting the School Year on a Positive Note: Five Key Suggestions for Parents

Tips for Talking with Your Gifted Child’s Teacher

Communicating Effectively with Your Gifted Child’s School

Dear Teacher, My Gifted Child is in Your Class

How Do I Work with My Child’s School? (pdf)

Tips for Your Gifted Kid’s Parent-Teacher Conference

Parent-Teacher Conferences

Communicate with Teachers about Meeting Your Gifted Child’s Needs

Six Tips for Communicating with Your Gifted Child’s Teacher

50 Tips, Tricks and Ideas for Teaching Gifted Students

What Parents Should Expect for the Gifted Child: How to Make It Happen

Why School’s Not Fair to Gifted Kids

Sprite’s Site: The Meeting

Sprite’s Site: Advocacy

Cybraryman’s Parent Teacher Conferences and Communication Page

Cybraryman’s Parents and Teachers Page

Cybraryman’s Parents and Teachers Event Open House and Orientation Page 

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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