Category Archives: Psychology

Understanding the Gifted Introvert

gtchat 11092017 Introverts

A simple explanation of introversion is ‘choosing solitude above socializing’. Introverts are keen observers, innovators, fiercely loyal, and empathetic. They possess many qualities associated with giftedness and don’t conform to societal norms; preferring to make their own rules as do those thought of as gifted.

Introverts appreciate a simpler life; planning and reflecting on new ways of doing things. They encourage others to develop self-reflection and think before acting. (Jung) Introverts seek depth and intimacy in relationships often leading to longer lasting and meaningful connections.

What are some of the myths about introverts? It’s a myth that introversion and shyness are the same thing. One is a choice; the other is not. To think it’s all or nothing is also a myth. According to Francesca Gino, “Personality traits, like introversion and extroversion, exist along a continuum.”

What are the downsides to believing in the extrovert/introvert dichotomy? It “traps us in stereotypes that affect how we interact with others. If you self-identify with one personality type, you risk ignoring behaviors or needs you may have.” (Gino)

Adults can help an introverted gifted child to better adapt to social situations. If a gifted child struggles with introversion; take a deep dive into what it is and is not. If they don’t feel it’s an issue; leave them alone. Adults can also provide gifted kids with strategies to adapt their introversion to their surroundings. Teachers, too, can make the gifted classroom a sanctuary for their introverted gifted students. (Byrd) A transcript may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Introversion: The Often Forgotten Factor Impacting the Gifted

The Top 10 Myths about Introverts

How Parents Can Help Introverts Thrive

Why Socializing Drains Introverts More Than Extroverts

Introvert or Extrovert? Here’s Another Way to Think about Your Personality

Popularity, Similarity, and the Network Extraversion Bias (pdf)

Teaching Introverts Is Different

Spending Time Alone Might Be the Best Way to Rest, According to Science

Introverts Don’t Hate People, They Hate Shallow Socializing

7 Reasons to Be Proud to Be an Introvert

People Love To Identify As “Introverts” But What Does That Term Actually Mean?

Embracing Introversion: Ways to Stimulate Reserved Students in the Classroom

10 Illustrations that Sum Up What Life is like for Introverts

The Secret Lives of Introverts: Inside Our Hidden World (Amazon)

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking (Amazon)

Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed & How We Can Stick to the Plan

Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed and How We Can Stick to the Plan (Amazon)

Hiding in the Bathroom: An Introvert’s Roadmap to Getting Out There (Amazon)

Cybraryman’s Introverted Children Page

The Gifted Introvert (#gtchat)

The Gifted Introvert (2002)

After the Show: The Many Faces of the Performer (SB Kaufman)

“Make Your Class Cozy for Gifted Introverts”  (Ian Byrd)

Live Your Life from the Front Seat: Accomplish Magnificent Things in Your Life, Relationships and Career (Amazon)

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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The Impact of Popular Culture on Gifted Children

gtchat 08222017 Popular Culture

It’s no secret to the gifted community that popular culture perpetuates stereotypes about gifted children.  They are viewed  as socially inept and geniuses  with little or no consideration of reality. Furthermore, it’s common for popular culture to pit various segments of the population against each other; athletes, artists, academics.

Negative portrayals of gifted children in the media can have a profound impact on a child’s self-concept. Gifted kids often feel they can’t live up to society’s expectations; that all children identified as gifted are intellectually flawless. This can also lead to them bullying in school when they do display academic achievement or talent.

The media’s influence in a child’s life is well recognized and there needs to be a sense of responsibility on its part. Recently, Hollywood and television have been doing a better job, but needs to understand the risks of undermining intellectual ability.

Teachers and school counselors need to be aware of the social-emotional needs of gifted children (Colangelo 2003). School personnel should be understanding of exceptional developmental issues and appropriate approaches to address needs.

Parents should consider asynchronous development, emotional sensitivity, and perfectionism as related to popular culture. They need to be alert to the possibility that their child may attempt to camouflage abilities to ‘fit in’ with age-peers. Parents should learn the signs of underachievement and seek professional help if deemed necessary.

To see what chat participants felt were the best and worst representations of gifted children in the media, check out the transcript of the chat at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

How Pop Culture Stereotypes Impact Self-Concept of Highly Gifted People

The Mad Genius Stereotype: Still Alive and Well

The Gifted Teen Survival Guide: Smart, Sharp & Ready for (Almost) Anything (Amazon)

Casting Minority Gifted Students: The Pedagogical Impact of Cinema on the Culture of Schooling

When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social & Emotional Needs (Amazon)

Giftedness in the Media

Hoagies’ Blog Hop: Gifted in Pop Culture

UK: Possible Effects of Social Media on GT Children’s Intelligence & Emotional Development (pdf)

AUS: Pink or Paris? Giftedness in Popular Culture (pdf)

Using Movies to Guide Teachers & Counselors to Collaborating to Support Gifted Students (pdf)

Amadeus to Young Einstein: Modern Cinema & Its Portrayal of Gifted Learners (pdf)

The Pursuit of Excellence or Search for Intimacy? The Forced-Choice Dilemma of Gifted Youth (pdf)

Indecent Exposure: Does the Media Exploit Highly Gifted Children? (pdf p.28) Gifted Education Communicator

A Portrayal of the Gifted in Magazines: An Initial Analysis (pdf ’96)

How Stereotypes Affect Gifted Children

Portrayal of Gifted Children in Children’s Chapter Books (pdf)

Nerds & Geeks: Society’s Evolving Stereotypes of Our Students with Gifts & Talents (pdf)

Sprite’s Site: Googlebox

Profiling the Gifted in Popular Culture

Everything I Needed to Know about Being a Smart Kid, I Learned from 80’s Movies

Gifted in Pop Culture: Role Models Required

Gifted Characters in Korean & Japanese Dramas

Giftedness Magnified

An Examination of Coercive Egalitarianism: Peer, Institutional & Cultural Sanctions, Against the Achieving Gifted Child (pdf ’92)

Accepting Scholarly Identity Gifted Students, Academic Crowd Membership & Identification with School (pdf)

AUS: Gifted Students’ Perceptions of the Characteristics of Effective Teachers (pdf)

The ‘G’ Word Film from Marc Smolowitz: Meet the Experts | Who Gets to be Gifted in America and Why? (Vimeo 12”14)

Are All Children Gifted?

Gifted: Who Ever Decided to Call These Gifts?

Sprite’s Site: Acknowledging Diversity: Gifted is not a Homogenous Group

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Creating Learning Environments that Invite Play

gtchat 05022017 Play

Play-based learning is how children learn about the world and develop life skills through play and gifted children are no different in their need for play. Children develop cognitive and social skills by playing with other children; both age-mates and intellectual peers. Play helps children mature emotionally and gain the self-confidence to try new experiences. Gifted children may experience asynchronous development and productive play can help ease transitions in many cases.

Play is essential to developing imagination, creativity, dexterity, and physical strength. It is important for healthy brain and neurological development and  allows children to express feelings about their life. Play during early childhood engages a child to interact with their environment. Adults who interact with gifted children know how important play is to their development.

Not all play is created equal; children can play alone, play along-side others without interaction, or play by imitating another playmate. As children begin to play with others, they start to engage and learn cooperation and collaboration. Gifted children should be given the freedom to choose which type of play they are most comfortable with; even when it may be to have alone time.

A rich play environment for children will incorporate choices; what, when and where to play. It will provide opportunities for kids to invent and extend their own play. Rich play environments incorporates varied places to play; inside or outside, local or away. The experiences do not need to be costly choices. Many times a trip to a park or hiking trail will provide an enriching experience for a curious mind.

Teachers can direct play be providing resources for play; such as art materials, legos, or ipads. Elementary teachers often create various ‘stations’ from which children can choose activities; like Daily 5. Teachers can offer students mentoring opportunities when appropriate to the activity.

Can the idea of ‘play’ have relevance at the secondary level? Although it may not be thought of as ‘play’ per se; secondary students need time to follow their passions. They often complain about the strict regimen of high school; they need to experience periods of choice. Adulthood is about choices; high school students need to experience how to make and accept consequences of their choices.

Gifted children thrive when allowed to create their own learning experiences and these often begin as play. Many of our greatest success stories begin through the simple act of playing. The transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Play Hints at Who We Are

Play and Children’s Learning in the Classroom

The Role of Play in Learning

What is the Teacher’s Role in Supporting Play in Early Childhood Classrooms?

Learning and Developing through Play (pdf)

The Cognitive Benefits of Play: Effects on the Learning Brain

Einstein Never Used Flashcards How Children Learn & Why They Need to Play More/ Memorize Less (Amazon)

Play in Education: The Role and Importance of Creative Learning 

Learning through Play

Balancing Child-Directed and Teacher-Directed Approaches

Why Kids Need to Play J

Different Types of Play

The Importance of Play in Promoting Healthy Child Development

How to Enhance Intuitive Science Knowledge in Infants and Toddlers (Amazon)

AUS: Play Based Learning (pdf)

Sprite’s Site: Gifted @ Play: Calculate Your Leisure Profile

Jake Labazzi Playing Anthropology (YouTube 4:35)

How to Recognize, Support and Teach Musically Gifted Kids

Joey Alexander – Giant Steps (In-Studio Performance) (YouTube 10:36)

Batik’s Brain Pickings: Why I am Using PBL to Design Professional Development (Knows and Need to Knows List)

LEGO® and the Gifted Visual-Spatial Child

Learning to Play at Nerd Camp

Ditch the Worksheets, Become a Picasso, a Kindergartener, and a Gifted@play! 

Gifted Children Need the Gift of Play

Learning through Play

The Games Our Children Play

Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Boredom Busters for Gifted Students

gtchat 04112017 Boredom

Why should teachers be concerned that gifted students are bored at all? At the very heart of teaching – of becoming a teacher – is the belief that all students in their care are learning. Boredom for any student often leads to classroom management issues and gifted students can pose significant disruptions to learning. It is in everyone’s best interest to keep students engaged.

“All kids need to be engaged at their zone of proximal development. Gifted kids needs freedom to explore.” ~ Barry Gelston, Mr. Gelston’s One Room Schoolhouse

Boredom can create many undesirable consequences in the classroom and can affect gifted students exponentially as they progress through the educational system. The results of boredom in school are felt far beyond the classroom walls; misbehavior doesn’t stop at end of school day.

There are things that shouldn’t be done in response to a gifted student who is truly bored at school. Gifted students shouldn’t be given busy work, ignored, or condescended to when they finish early. They shouldn’t be expected to serve as teacher’s helper simply because it’s a convenient way to occupy their time.  Down time in the classroom should be used to provide meaningful work for gifted students that addresses their specific needs.

No more worksheet packets! End the madness! Appropriate, purposeful instruction based on data driven decisions. ~ Sarah Kessel, Supervisor of Advanced Learning Programs

There are strategies which can be used to alleviate boredom in the regular education classroom. Pre-assessment is the first step to heading off boredom. Realistic expectations of ability are needed. Rigorous, relevant and appropriate differentiation takes time and effort when planning curricular interventions for GT. (See resources below.)

“I also like to have students “choose their own adventure” by finding ways to show concepts with their voice- how can you show this?” ~ Heather Vaughn, M.Ed, UT Austin – Coordinator of Advanced Academics

What should teachers look for to determine if the student is bored or it is something else (perfectionism, 2E, ability)? Teachers need to look for signs of misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis. Then, refer the student to the appropriate staff members for evaluation. Teachers should have any and all relevant evaluations of student’s past performance and possible issues.

Engaging kids in solving authentic problems is 1 of the BEST ways to make their education REAL! ~ Tracy Fisher, School Board Member, Coppell, TX

Parents can do numerous things to combat summertime and holiday boredom when kids aren’t in school. Parenting GT kids is hard work. Adequate planning is essential to head off boredom. They can consult with GT teachers, gifted organizations, and websites about summer opportunities.

It’s also important for parents to recognize need for ‘down’ time as well. Not every minute away from school needs to be planned. Summer and school breaks are a wonderful time for gifted kids to explore their passions – think family vacations; camps; and internships.

Boredom does not need to be a subject to be avoided, but rather seen as an invitation to see how to best meet the needs of the gifted student.  A transcript of the chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Bored Out of Their Minds

15 Tips on How to Differentiate Learning for Gifted Learners

Boredom Busters: Breaking the Bonds of Boredom (PPT)

Gifted and Bored? Maybe Not

Early Finishers: Ideas for Teachers

Early Finishers: 9 Ideas for Students

Smart and Bored

Smart Kids and the Curse of the Kidney Table

Primarily Speaking: Word Work Fun!

I’m Done, Now What?

Daily Practice for the New SAT

TED Connections from MENSA for Kids

Book Review Writing: A Guide for Young Reviewers

Cybraryman’s Geocaching Page

Cybraryman’s Programming – Coding Literacy Page

Cybraryman’s Robotics Page

Genius Hour with Guest, Andi McNair

Steve Spangler: The Science of Connecting People

Coppell Gifted Association: Summer MOSAIC 2017

Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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