Category Archives: Teaching

Performance-Based Assessments

 

Performance-based assessments provide a more realistic way of assessing skills which reflect real world lived experiences. Students need to be prepared for workplace environments that don’t rely on standardized evaluations. Employers seek out those who can demonstrate the ability to apply their skills and utilize their knowledge-base to identify and solve problems. Students need to be prepared to meet these challenges. Performance-based assessments showcase or measure a student’s use of higher order thinking and their ability to create products and complete processes.

Performance-based assessments provide a way for students to be able to apply knowledge across multiple disciplines and increase their worth as productive and valuable employees. Students learn to be contributing members to group work and able to develop viable action plans in new situations on a timely basis. Performance-based assessments make students more responsible for demonstrating what they have learned.

What are some drawbacks of performance-based assessments? These types of assessments can be difficult to conduct in larger classes as compared to standardized testing. They are more costly and time consuming which can be problematic in tight budget environments.

We know that standardized testing can affect outcomes for marginalized groups of students, but that doesn’t necessarily imply that performance-based assessments are a superior alternative. In order to better meet the needs of diverse learners, how project-based assessments are designed and implemented is a better indication that greater equity will be achieved. Performance-based assessments can benefit diverse learners when paired with technology, customization, teacher collaboration and professional development for teachers and staff.

How can teachers create performance-based assessments for their students? They must first have a clear and definable understanding of their subject matter and then be able to identify goals they intend to assess. Teachers should set course standards, be prepared to identify students’ learning gaps, design the course, provide materials and implement educational learning plans.

Performance-based assessments become authentic when they are considered meaningful and students are engaged. Consideration should be taken that the product created or final activity provides a way for students to demonstrate their understanding of the subject matter. Authentic assessments such as presentations, portfolios, performances or projects must be open-ended and open to multiple potential outcomes. A transcript of this chat is available at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Performance-Based Assessment for 21st-Century Skills (Prufrock)

Performance-Based Assessment: Reviewing the Basics

Taking Teaching to (Performance) Task: Linking Pedagogical and Assessment Practices (pdf)

Stanford: What is Performance-Based Assessment? (pdf)

What is Performance-Based Learning and Assessment and Why is it Important?

Developing Assessments of Deeper Learning: The Costs and Benefits of Using Tests that Help Students Learn (pdf)

Authentic Ways to Develop Performance-Based Activities

Performance Based Assessment

Does Performance Based Assessment Produce Better Students?

Performance Assessment and Authentic Assessment: A Conceptual Analysis of the Literature (pdf)

Connecting Performance Assessment to Instruction: A Comparison of Behavioral Assessment, Mastery Learning, Curriculum-Based Measurement, and Performance Assessment (ERIC)

Fairness in Performance Assessment (ERIC)

Guidelines for the Development and Management of Performance Assessments (ERIC)

Developing and Implementing an Assessment Plan

Program-Based Review and Assessment (pdf)

Basic Steps of Program Assessment

Performance Based Assessment & Learning (YouTube 3:08)

Performance-Based Assessment: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners

Performance Assessment: A Deeper Look at Practice and Research

Cybraryman’s Assessments Page

Image courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Advertisements

Benefits of Online Learning for Gifted/2e

Our guest this week was Madeline Goodwin, of Exceeds Expectations Learning – 2EL. Our chat centered on the benefits of online learning for gifted and 2e (twice-exceptional) students.

Online learning for gifted students can be a way for these students to study with intellectual peers despite geographical barriers or lack of peers in local area. It has numerous benefits for 2e students who may struggle socially or emotionally to work or study in a regular classroom. The benefit of smaller classes and more individualized learning shouldn’t be overlooked.

Parents should take time to research whether their child would benefit from online learning. Participating in a free online class such as Khan Academy or similar program allows the student to experience online participation. Consideration should be given to the academic needs of the student and what classes are available. Also, it’s important to determine if classes fit in with long-range goals or may simply be taken for enrichment or a student’s passion. A student’s schedule should also be considered; does the student have time to take online classes?

What is the time commitment to take an online course? It is usually based on the program being taken. It may follow a semester format or calendar format. Online courses have evolved over time to include online live sessions, opportunities for  study sessions, and ability to meet other students from all over the world.

Online learning is excellent for public, private or homeschool students to work in areas of interests not available to them otherwise. They can be extremely cost-effective for both schools and families.

Resources can be provided to help students connect with other students. Many online classes provide times for online chat sessions for students to meet, ask questions, and study together. GT students work well with intellectual peers, but often don’t have contact with them in real life. When possible and appropriate, students may want to schedule time to meet outside of class or even facetime with classmates or instructors.

Take time to make sure a student wants to engage in online classes and has the requisite skills to complete tasks, stay focused, and time to commit to online learning. Before starting an online class, seriously plan for what to do if things don’t work out. Devise a plan B just in case and hopefully it will never be needed. Parents should be prepared to provide a strong family support system to ensure a successful outcome for their child. We encourage you to read the  transcript of this chat for additional information which may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Distance Learning Programs

Distance Education: Where It Started and Where It Stands for Gifted Children and Their Educators (pdf)

Online learning: A Smart Way to Nurture Gifted Kids

For Frustrated Gifted Kids, A World of Online Opportunities

Virtual Schools and Online Learning for K-12 Students is not a Trend or a Fad

Serving Gifted Learners Beyond the Traditional Classroom: A Guide to Alternative Programs and Services (Prufrock)

Online Learning for Gifted Students: An Idea Whose Time has Come

Is Your Gifted Child Ready for Online Learning?

Meeting the Challenges of Working with Gifted Students (pdf)

Distance Learning for Gifted Students: Outcomes for Elementary, Middle, and High School Aged Students (pdf)

Beyond the Classroom Walls: Teachers’ and Students’ Perspectives on How Online Learning Can Meet the Needs of Gifted Students (pdf)

“Just What I Need”: Gifted Students’ Perceptions of One Online Learning System (pdf)

Examining the Effectiveness of Using Web-based Learning for Gifted Students: Jordan as Case Study

Science, Creativity and the Real World: Lessons Learned from the U.S. Homeschool Community

Cybraryman’s Blended Learning Page

Cybraryman’s Google Hangout Page

Cybraryman’s Skype Page

Cybraryman’s MOOC Page

Image courtesy of Unsplash

Photo courtesy of Madeline Goodwin and graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Gifted Education Coordinator: Stakeholder or Gatekeeper?

gtchat 10182018 Coordinators

 

The role of the gifted education coordinator is highly dependent on how a school district is organized. Their role may be strictly administrative or a blended role such as teacher, student advisor, and program coordinator. Administrative duties generally include producing student IEPs (where required), providing PD to district teachers and staff, meeting state mandates, and resolving parent/teacher or student/teacher issues.

Should the GT coordinator be seen as a stakeholder or gatekeeper?  Whether seen as a stakeholder or gatekeeper, the reality is often in the eye of the beholder (parents or other teachers) rather than as they see themselves. Parents who are happy with their child’s gifted program will most likely see a stakeholder. The manner in which a GT coordinator approaches their job and views gifted education in general often influences who they are viewed by teachers and parents. Gatekeepers may restrict access to programs for various reasons.

There are some ways GT coordinators can interact with teachers and staff to build consensus around the gifted program to benefit students. Professional development for teachers and staff trainings are seen as key consensus builders in gifted education. Few teachers have any exposure to gifted education courses at the undergraduate level. GT coordinators can model best practices in their approach to developing the gifted program in their school. They should seek certification or an advanced degree in gifted education if possible.

Positive interactions with other educators responsible for educating GT students is a good first step in recognizing the need for a strong gifted program. Attending conferences and workshops dealing with gifted education can have a profound effect on how a GT coordinator views gifted education.

What are some justifications GT coordinators can use for providing gifted education services when they are not valued by the local community? A local community will not support a program it does not understand or for which it sees no value being provided or returned to it. GT coordinators should develop outreach programs to educate the local community about gifted education. GT coordinators can periodically bring together the local community, teachers, and parents to serve together on gifted advisory boards. By involving community members in decision making, they can see benefits of the programs.

“If a student is operating at one-and-a-half or more standard deviations below average, we provide services in the form of Special Education. If a student operates at one-and-a-half standard deviations ABOVE average, shouldn’t we do the same?” ~ Jeffrey Farley

State and national gifted organizations such as the NAGC, SENG and TAGT are a good place for GT coordinators to find resources to inform their decisions about the administration of gifted programs in their schools. Also, most state departments of education have information on their websites about gifted education programming.

On a personal note: I would like to thank Mr. Jeffrey Farley, M.Ed., former District Special Programs Coordinator, Beaumont ISD, for taking over the moderator’s role this week so that I could take a few days off to visit family! ~ Lisa

Please check out the resources below about the role of gifted coordinators as well as resources for them.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 1 PM NZDT/11 AM AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Stakeholder or Gatekeeper: The Role of the Principal in Gifted Education (pdf)

Ten Things All Administrators Should Know about Gifted Children

Shaping School Culture: The Heart of Leadership (bn)

TEMPO: Positive Ripple Effects of Professional Development for Gifted Programs (pdf)

Programs and Services for Gifted Secondary Students: A Guide to Recommended Practices (Prufrock)

Giving Our Gifted Students a Voice (pdf)

Administrator Quick Guide to Gifted Education (pdf)

Resources for Administrators

Administrator Toolbox 

Texas G/T Program Implementation Resource: G/T Coordinator-Teacher-Counselor Documents

How Leadership Influences Student Learning (pdf)

Pre-K to Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards

Resources for Administrators

Gifted Tactics in the Field: Reports from Four School Districts on the Challenges of Instruction for Gifted Students

Snapshot Survey of PK-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Effectiveness Factors (pdf)

Image courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Creative Commons

Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Farley.   Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Resources for GT Kids

gtchat 08302018 Kids Resources

Many websites, blog posts and conference presentations offer resources for parents or educators, but this week at #gtchat we focused on resources for the gifted child. When discussing books, it was noted that often books for parents are accompanied by books for children as well. This presents parents with the opportunity of talking with and interacting with their child on a particular subject.

Many gifted organizations (national and state) include information specifically for kids. It’s a good place to start. Other resources include Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, Mensa for Kids (last week’s guest), Byrdseed, and Hoagies Gifted.

Classroom resources which are uniquely suited for GT kids can be used in a standalone class or used in conjunction with a differentiated curriculum. It’s important to have a certified GT teacher who can help select appropriate classroom resources.

There are so many excellent available competitions. Most involve teamwork, but there are also those who have an individual opportunity for kids. It is important to match a kid’s interests to the competition. This isn’t always possible, but should be considered.

Online classes may be used to complete specific required coursework and should be taught by certified teachers. However, many GT kids like to take classes for fun where a certified teacher is not needed. MOOC’s are also a good way to provide acceleration opportunities for GT kids. Many now include credit granting options.

When planning for college, GT students may have unique challenges regarding situations involving acceleration, early (early) entrance, college credits earned in high school, and financing their education. College may not be the first option for all GT students; many may opt for a gap year or may not need college to utilize their talents. Career planning is important at this point. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

100 Resources for Gifted Kids

Byrdseed’s Puzzlements (weekly email)

Mensa for Kids

Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth – A CTY Reading List: Good Books for Bright Kids

Guide to Scholarships & Competitions for Gifted Youth

Gifted Study: Resources for Students

Academic Programs and Competitions

Enrichment Program Listing

NSGT: Educational Resources for Gifted and Talented Children

Exquisite Minds: Best Sites for Kids

Youth Code Jam (SATX): Online Resources – Learn to Code

GHF Online

QuestBridge

Gifted and Talented Students in Australia – Resources and Services

Davidson Institute

Nothing You Can’t Do (Prufrock Press)

The Gifted Kids Workbook: Mindfulness Skills to Help Children Reduce Stress, Balance Emotions, and Build Confidence (bn)

VA Association for the Gifted: Resources

Tom Clynes: Resources for the Gifted

Wonderopolis

Hoagies Gifted: Reading Lists for Your Gifted Child

Peter Reynolds: Creatrilogy (bn)

Royal Fireworks Press: Novels about Gifted and Talented Children

The Little Prince

Desmos (math site)

GeoGebra Math Apps

Wolfram Alpha Computational Intelligence

Kenken Puzzles

Code.org

The Kid Should See This

National Archives

Scratch

3Doodler

LEGO Education

TED Talks

Cybraryman’s Educators Page

Stories with Holes

Mathcounts

Destination Imagination

Science Olympiad

Future Problem Solving Program International

The Stock Market Game

First LEGO League

Odyssey of the Mind

Speak Up! Speak Out!

AUS: Aussie Educator Student Competitions

Solar Car Challenge

MaPP Challenge

Explore UT (TX)

Photo and graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

%d bloggers like this: