Monthly Archives: May 2015

How to Chat on Twitter

gtchat How to Join a Twitter Chat Graphic

 

From time to time, I am asked, “How do I join your chat on Twitter?” Since we were off last week, I thought this would be a good time to explain the chat process.

Each Friday at 7E/6C/5M/4P, people get together on Twitter to chat about all things related to the gifted community using the hashtag #gtchat. To join the conversation, you need to have a Twitter account and it cannot be designated as ‘private’. If you feel the need to protect your tweets (only followers can see what you tweet), consider opening a second account under a pseudonym just to chat.

 

gtchat on Twitter Search

 

You can participate in a chat directly on Twitter by searching the hashtag #gtchat and then choosing the ‘Live’ tab on the search results page. You may want to Save your search to use for future reference. (Hint: Follow #gtchat’s official Twitter account @gtchatmod to see tweets concerning chat times and topics.) It is important to know that you must remember to add the hashtag #gtchat to each of your tweets so that they will be visible to the rest of the people at the chat. As the chat progresses, you will have to Refresh your screen to see available new tweets.

gtchat Twitter Account graphic

 

An alternate way to join our chat is to use a 3rd party app such as Tweetchat or Twubs. These apps add the hashtag to your tweets automatically and also only display the tweets using the hashtag during the chat. Most participants, including the moderator, use Tweetchat. To use this app, sign into your Twitter account; open a second tab in your browser and go to Tweetchat.com; enter the hashtag ‘#gtchat’ on the opening screen; utilize the ‘Authorize App’ function; you will be redirected to the #gtchat tweet stream. Once there, you can tweet, retweet, reply and favorite tweets just like on Twitter. (Hint: If you are familiar with apps such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite, you may use either of these as well.)

 

gtchat Tweetchat Opening Screen

 

It’s as simple as that! So, what have you been waiting for? Join us on Fridays for #gtchat on Twitter. National and International chat times are listed below. It you miss a chat, you can always access the transcript at Storify and I post a short summary with links from the chat here at this blog every week. Take a look around the blog to see what you have been missing! For more general information about chatting on Twitter, check out the links below. (Thanks to Jerry Blumengarten @cybraryman1 for the links. Jerry also was instrumental in helping #gtchat get started!)

Prior to our last chat, we welcomed a new sponsor for #gtchat, GiftedandTalented.com. You can read more about this new partnership at the TAGT website here.

gtchat-logo-with-sponsor

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented and sponsored by GiftedandTalented.com is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 11 AM NZST/9 AM AEST to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our new Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media    Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

How to Take Part in or Moderate a Chat on Twitter from Cybraryman

Twitter from Cybraryman

Twitter for Beginners from Cybraryman

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in a Twitter Chat

How Do You Participate in t Twitter Chat?

Twitter Chats: How to Survive and Thrive in a Twitter Chat … Hockey Style Eh? 

Official Twitter Educational Chat Schedule

“A Nation Empowered” with guest, Dr. Ann Shoplik

 

 

gtchat Nation Empowered2 05152015

The recently released report, A Nation Empowered, is a 10 year follow-up to the seminal report, A Nation Deceived, and was the subject of our chat this week with Dr. Ann Shoplik. Dr. Shoplik is the Administrator of the Acceleration Institute at Belin-Blank (University of Iowa) and Co-editor of the new report. Dr. Katie McClarty, who contributed a chapter to the new report, also joined us.

We asked Dr. Shoplik why a new report was written. She explained. “Acceleration is the most-researched, yet under-utilized program option for gifted kids. Policy and practice haven’t kept up with the research on acceleration. Short and long-term research evidence is clear: Acceleration works! Colleges of Education don’t teach acceleration. We must inform administrators and teachers. [And] It was time to update the classic report!” From the report, [A Nation Empowered] was “designed to empower educators with evidence to use in implementing the various types of acceleration. Robust empirical evidence is the most effective means of empowering educators and parents of gifted students.”

Image 3 Acceleration works green

Despite all the research evidence, schools, parents, and teachers still have not accepted the idea of acceleration. There seem to be as many myths about acceleration as there are about being gifted. Combine this with concern about a child’s social-emotional development, lack of experience, a limited knowledge base, personal bias on the part of many educators and it’s easy to see why acceleration has not been implemented on a wide-scale basis.

Image 4 Like minded students

However, it is interesting to note that similar concerns are rarely voiced when discussing student athletes:

“Imagine, if you can, a football coach putting his arm around his starting tailback and telling him the players on the other team are going to feel bad if the tailback runs past them. “So when you get the ball,” the coach tells his player, “ease up.” No coach would ever say that. And yet, in our classrooms, we tell our smart kids, in subtle ways, “Be careful about how you show your smarts. Don’t be too showy.”  A Nation Empowered Vol. 1 P. 39

What are some signs to look for that a student should be accelerated? The number one answer was “boredom”! This happens “when there is a mismatch between the student’s intellectual level and the level of school work,” Dr. Shoplik told us. Teachers, school psychologists, or gifted/talented coordinators may make recommendations for acceleration, but often don’t.

Image 2 School Counselors

The benefits of acceleration are well-documented. Students who are accelerated demonstrate exceptional achievements years later. Dr. Shoplik said, “Failing to accelerate an able student is likely to have negative effects on motivation, productivity; may even lead to dropping out. Achieving success in a class that is challenging bolsters confidence, raises expectations and alters mindsets.”

Image 1 Careers orange

It was surprising to learn that there are 20 different types of acceleration! This allows it to be tailored to the needs of the student. Dr. Shoplik elaborated, “Students not ready for a grade skip can accelerate in 1 subject [or opt for] a combined class, distance learning, dual enrollment, or credit by exam.” A full transcript of the chat may be found at Storify.

Image 7 parent another copy

Prior to this week’s chat, we welcomed a new sponsor for #gtchat, GiftedandTalented.com. You can read more about this new partnership at the TAGT website here.

gtchat-logo-with-sponsor

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 11 AM NZST/9 AM AEST to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our new Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Acceleration PowerPoint (registration required) h

Academic Acceleration for Gifted Students: A Nation Empowered from Blog Talk Radio

The Advantages of Acceleration via #gtchat Advisor Lisa Van Gemert

Hoagies’ Blog Hop March 2015: Acceleration

Report Says Schools Still Shortchanging Gifted Kids

Study: Gifted Students Still at Risk of Being Left Behind

Get the Report: A Nation Empowered at the Acceleration Institute

Acceleration Institute Resources for Educators

U.S. States’ Policies on Acceleration at the Acceleration Institute

New Research Supports Positive Impact of Skipping a Grade on Gifted Students’ Career Success & Satisfaction

As A Nation, How Can We Best Empower Our Gifted Kids? via Jonathan Wai

Skip A Grade? Start Kindergarten Early? It’s Not So Easy

Equal Talents, Unequal Opportunities (pdf)

Early Enrollment Myths: Social & Emotional Fit

Report Suggests Accelerating Gifted Students

The Grade Skip Dilemma: Why Your Child May Fare Better than You Expect

Exceptionally Gifted Children: Long-Term Outcomes of Academic Acceleration and Nonacceleration (pdf)

Should I accelerate my gifted child?

Iowa Acceleration Scale

Hoagies Gifted Academic Acceleration

Belin-Blank Workshops in Gifted Education

Online Learning: 3 Approaches for Gifted/2E

gtchat Online Learning 05082015

 

When three stars join together, their light shines brightly and that is certainly what happened when Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, Online G3 and Mr. Gelston’s One Room School House recently announced their new online learning alliance. All three organizations offer online classes and if they don’t have what you need, they will refer you to one of their partners. Fortunately for gifted kids, all their classes are suited for gifted and twice-exceptional students.

This week’s #gtchat hosted the executive directors and several instructors from all three alliance partners. Each answered questions about their particular programs as well as more queries about online learning in general. It was a fast-paced and informative discussion.

We first chatted about the benefits of online classes for gifted and 2E students. These classes can make learning more accessible for students who don’t have these resources locally. It provides a way for these kids to meet (virtually) and to interact with each other and connect with expert teachers. These classes can be tailored to the specific needs of the student and their individual schedules regardless of where they live; provided in a safe and quiet environment. They are also available to schools and homeschool resource centers blending learning with regular curriculum offerings.

We would like to thank Corin Goodwin, executive director of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum; Jaime Smith, founder of Online G3; and Barry Gelston, owner and Claudia L’Amoreaux, instructor at Mr. Gelston’s One Room Schoolhouse for being our guests this week. Several other instructors joined us including Justin Schwamm (GHF – Latin); Christy Knockleby (GHF – Minecraft Math);  and Madeline Goodwin (GHF – Planet Earth & Climate Science). A transcript of the chat may be found on Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 11 AM NZST/9 AM AEST to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our new Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Class Offerings:

GHF Online Class Schedule

Online G3

Online G3 Summer Courses

Mr. Gelston’s One Room Schoolhouse

About the Alliance:

Education is Better with Friends (OnlineG3)

Friends We Trust (Mr. Gelston’s One Room Schoolhouse)

Online Learning Partnership (GHF)

Additional Links:

GHF Online Teacher Bios

G3 Course Placement and Progression

He’s Really Gifted In Math?!?

Online Learning Communities Revisited

GHF Online Update (Facebook)

 

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad, Barry Gelston, Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, Online G3 and TAGT.

How to Create a Gifted Individualized Education Plan

gtchat GIEP

 

Creating a Gifted Individualized Education Plan is hard work. It is a formal plan that delineates the accommodations a student will have in place for an academic year. Even if your locality does not recognize GIEPs or IEPs, they can be useful as a framework to advocate for a gifted student. GIEPs need to be prepared and submitted well in advance of the year in which they are expected to be implemented. They should be detailed and specific to ensure academic progress and talent development.

Gifted IEPs are a good idea for gifted students because a written and agreed to plan is easier to implement and monitor over the course of the school year. When written with specific goals and appropriate terminology, they have  a greater success rate than verbal agreements. Beyond academic objectives, Gifted IEPs can address a child’s social adjustment with peers and learning preferences.

Parents, gifted education teachers, regular education teachers, guidance counselors,  and school psychologists can all be involved in the GIEP process. The student should be consulted throughout the process as well. If the gifted student does not ‘buy in’ to the final agreement, the chances of success are slim. Often schools form multidisciplinary teams to review education plans.

What should be included in a GIEP? An excellent example can be found here. Assessment  and testing data will usually be presented in the GIEP. Present Levels of Educational Performance (PLEP) provide a baseline to aid in showing annual growth of a student. Specific goals and expected outcomes related to the student’s strengths and interests; specifically designed instruction to be provided; and support services like transportation needs, teaching strategies, collaborative time for gifted and regular education teachers should be included. Areas of weakness (academic, social, emotional, motivational) to be remediated may also be considered.

Resources for completing a comprehensive Gifted Individualized Education Plan may be found in the links provided at the end of this post. A full transcript can be found on our Storify page.

Thanks to Leslie Graves, Jerry Blumengarten, Jen MerrillAmy Harrington, Jeremy Bond and Rhonda Boyer for additional links included below.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 11 AM NZST/9 AM AEST to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our new Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Sample GIEP from PA (pdf)

A Parents’ Guide to Gifted Education in PA (pdf)

How To/Resources for Writing a GIEP

Davidson Institute for Talent Development Database on GIEP Meetings

Kids’ Health Gifted Education: IEP – P. 2

Designing & Developing Programs for Gifted Students (Amazon)

Re-Forming Gifted Education: How Parents & Teachers Can Match the Program to the Child (Amazon)

Tier & Compacting: Differentiating Instruction for Gifted Learners (Slideshare)

The Care & Feeding of Gifted Children

Present Levels of Educational Performance (PLEPs)

Developing an Educational Plan/Curriculum

Instructional Management/Individualization

Instructional Management/Acceleration Subject Acceleration

Instructional Managemnt/Acceleration Grade Acceleration

Instructional Management/Grouping

Gifted Journey: Individualized Education Plans

Cybraryman’s IEP Page

Cybraryman’s Individual Learning Program Page

Cybraryman’s Personalized Learning Page

Motivation, Engagement and Student Voice

IDEA Applies To ‘Twice Exceptional’ Students Too

Twice-Exceptional or Misdiagnosed?

Parent’s Unofficial Guide to Gifted IEPs and Gifted IEP Meetings

Berkeley Parents Network Advice about IEP and 504 Plans

Wrightslaw How Can I Fight for a Gifted Child?

Glenforest Secondary School IEP Gifted Plan

The IEP and the Gifted Learner

Blue Valley Schools Sample IEP File

Advocacy/Special Education: Getting What Your Child Needs from Schools

Tip Sheet for Developing the IEP for Gifted

Your Gifted IEP (YouTube 3:12)

 

GIEP Resources by State:

Arizona Department of Education Explains Non-use of IEP for Gifted

Connecticut The Student Success Plan

Kansas Gifted File Review Worksheet

Louisiana’s Educational Rights of Gifted/Talented Children in Public Schools

Louisiana’s IEP Handbook for Gifted/Talented Students (2002) (pdf)

Michigan Department of Education Talent Development (Local Initiatives)

Missouri Department of Education Gifted Education Programs Procedure Manual (No IEP)

New Jersey FAQs on Gifted Education

New Mexico IEP Requirements for Gifted – P. 71 (pdf)

Oklahoma Report on Gifted & Talented (pdf)

Pennsylvania Department of Education Gifted Education (Available GIEP – Online)

 

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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