Blog Archives

Connecting the Gifted Community on Social Media

 

What are some positive ways to connect with the gifted community on social media? Take time to help new members on a platform – recommend people to follow on Twitter and welcome new group members on Facebook. Be sure you understand the intent of a tweet before responding. When you respond to tweets, be thoughtful, meaningful, and respectful. Share and retweet good news about the GT community, your students, and your child’s school/GT program.

Social networking has an effect on the way children are educated both at school and outside of it. There are both negative and positive effects to social media use by GT students. Although a way of life for most, some of these students are more at ease with face-to-face interaction. Adults need to be cognizant of individual needs. Isolation due to geography or contact with intellectual peers is a real concern for many GT students and social media can bridge the gap by bringing students together online.

How do we leverage social media as a pedagogical tool in the GT classroom? Teachers and admins can share information/success stories quickly on platforms like Twitter. Twitter is a great way to stay in touch with busy parents by using a dedicated hashtag. Twitter is a great platform for providing global feedback to students on their projects/assignments, for students to ask questions of experts, and to showcase student work on a broader stage. Facebook is constantly updating tools for student use including dedicated class pages, ways to post about upcoming events, and Facebook Live for broadcasting. Class blogs provide students a platform on which to share and archive for future use writing assignments with the ability to receive assessment and feedback through a comment section.

Integrating social media into school culture can become a powerful tool for connecting with faculty, parents, and the local community in real time in ways that were not available in the past. School admins can share school news on social networks, hold online meetings with parents, and provide professional development on gifted education for faculty and staff.

Social media platforms can provide useful networking for students seeking jobs/internships; finding mentors; collaborating on international projects; promoting personal/school success stories. They are already an intricate part of students’ lives outside of school. Connecting students with intellectual peers beyond their local schools is a logical step in creating community.

Meeting in real life can act as a validation of friendships and professional relationships begun online. It can enable further collaboration on community building by extending existing personal and professional networks. Within the gifted community, conferences are an important way of connecting with people you meet online. Tweetups can provide social context to relationships and serve to create a sense of community. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Connecting the Gifted Community

How Social Media is Reshaping Today’s Education System

22 Ways to Use Social Media in Your Classroom

Connecting with Faraway Teachers Via Social Media

Using Social Media to Be a Better Education Leader with Top Tweeting Principal Eric Sheninger

The Ups and Downs of Social Media

Contribution of Social Media to the Students’ Academic Development

10 Examples of the Positive Impact of Social Media

10 Ways to Use Twitter in Teaching

[Social Media] Staying Connected with Educator Network Twitter Chats

SENG Conference 2019

TAGT #giftED19 Conference

Cybraryman’s Social Media and Social Networking Page

Social Media Usage Motivations of Gifted Children

How to Provide High Aptitude Learners with Social and Emotional Supports

The Hottest Chat App for Teens Is … Google Docs

NAGC: Professional Learning

Global Education Conference

Image courtesy of Pixabay   Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Reassessing the Need for Soft Skills for Gifted Students

 

Soft skills – aka non-cognitive skills or social-emotional learning skills – can be categorized in many ways. In school, we consider communication skills, problem solving skills, critical thinking and concise writing. They also involve resilience, resourcefulness, integrity, ambition … habits that improve learning. Soft skills revolve around the realization that mastery is an ongoing process and not based on hard and fast rules. Soft skills can be applied in any circumstance one chooses to use them.

Considering that soft skills need to be taught even though hard to measure; skills such as self-regulation, flexibility when faced with new situations and motivation to get things done can all help students succeed. Career success must embody the adoption of soft skills such as dependability, adaptability, working on a team while maintaining positive relationships with others. Other invaluable skills include stress management, facilitation and leadership.  Advanced soft skills are necessary for career advancement; skills often needed earlier in life for GT students and include networking skills, negotiating skills, savvy self-promotion, and the skill of persuasion.

Academic expectations for GT students are extremely high throughout the school day … expected to be leaders, independent learners, team leaders, great communicators … all of which can lead to burnout. GT students and their teachers are mainly focused on academics and achievement; easily measurable expectations. Soft skills may be overlooked, but necessary for these students just as they are for all students. Many GT students struggle with interpersonal relationships, dealing with failure and perfectionism, working in class with age-peers. They need to be taught perseverance, flexibility, regulating emotions.

How do soft skills help our 2e kids to be successful? The very nature of twice-exceptional students – having needs to be met, but often misdiagnosed or mis-judged … calls for nurturing of soft skills in their everyday life. When 2e kids are given the tools to succeed; they can live a more fulfilled life without the stresses associated with social and emotional setbacks.

Soft skills need to be taught and well-prepared teachers are essential for this task. The most simple soft skills – reading social cues, socializing with age-peers, respecting others – are the foundation of a successful life. They can aid in self-confidence and emotional regulation.

Best practice for teaching soft skills begins in the realization that these skills aid in learning. Teachers who model excellent soft skills such as self-regulation, patience, and empathy will be the most successful. In teaching social skills, best practices values students’ voice and attitude towards education, school attendance, and behaviors. Student outcomes are dependent on more than test scores and achievements. Soft skills can be integrated into the curriculum through project and problem based learning, 20% time, and genius hour which encourage time-management, self-control and self-reflection on the educational process.

Parents of gifted students can reinforce soft skills outside the classroom by modeling these skills in their everyday life. Character building based programs can have wide ranging positive influence on their children. They can seek to build a positive relationship with their child’s teacher and school personnel. They can model the use of patience and perseverance in difficult relationships; seeking additional support when necessary. Parents who place value on soft skills are uniquely positioned to teach them at home as well and to focus on the benefits of future outcomes for success in their child’s life.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Study: Teaching Noncognitive Skills can Spur Better Long-term Student Outcomes

Understanding a Teacher’s Long-Term Impact

What Do Test Scores Miss? The Importance of Teacher Effects on Non-Test Score Outcomes (pdf)

Teaching for High Potential: A Focus on the Soft Skills (pdf)

No Mind Left Behind: Understanding and Fostering Executive Control–The Eight Essential Brain Skills Every Child Needs to Thrive (book bn)

Empathy at Work for High-Potential Young Leaders

Why You Need to Focus on Soft Skills

Four-Dimensional Education: The Competencies Learners Need to Succeed (book)

Four-Dimensional Education – The Competencies Learners Need to Succeed (YouTube 1:18)

Helping Gifted Culturally Diverse Students Cope with Socio-Emotional Concerns

Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education (book bn)

Gifted Children’s Bill of Rights

Beyond the Test: How Teaching Soft Skills Helps Students Succeed

The Turn-Around, Upside-Down Alphabet Book (book)

Hannah’s Collections (book bn)

The Most Magnificent Thing (book bn)

Should Schools Teach ‘Soft Skills?’ Many Say ‘Yes’

The Soft Skills College Students Need to Succeed Now and in the Future

Soft Skills List – 28 Skills to Working Smart

What It’s Really Like to Transition into Self-Management

Why Being Smart is Not Enough — The Social Skills and Structures of Tackling Complexity

Six Ways to Teach Social and Emotional Skills All Day

Mind Matters Podcast: True Grit – Fostering Tenacity and Resilience (Audio)

Cybraryman’s Soft Skills Page

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Books, Blogs & Documentaries for GT Parents & Teachers

gtchat 05312018 Books

There are many ways to find online for resources regarding gifted children, parenting, and the education of GT students. Google Alerts can be set to learn about the latest news in gifted children, gifted education and gifted & talented. Of course, you can check out @gtchatmod Twitter lists! Also, state and national gifted organization websites have great resources. Don’t rely solely on your own state’s sites; check around (TX, CA, OH, MN, CT).

Organizations for the gifted have resources for parents and teachers of GT students. On Twitter, a few include @NAGCGIFTED, @SENG_Gifted, @GiftedHF, @PPUK_,  and @wcgtc; as well as @IEAgifted @SIGifted @belinblank @CECTAG and @Hoagies Gifted.  Mainstream education websites also provide resources for gifted and talented; such as, @edutopia @ASCD, and @iste.

You can check out our transcript at Wakelet to see favorite books, blogs and documentaries of chat participants. We’ve included links below to additional sites.

Disclaimer: Inclusion in the links below is for informational purposes only and does not imply a recommendation by Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Publishers:

Publishers Specializing in the Gifted

Prufrock Press

Great Potential Press

GHF Press

Free Spirit Publishing

Royal Fireworks Press

Tumblehome Learning

AUS: Hawker Brownlow Education

Teachers College Press Columbia University

Information & Publications at NAGC

Books:

Books on Gifted Topics

TAGT Legacy Book Awards

Boost: 12 Effective Ways to Lift Up Our Twice-Exceptional Children (Perspectives) (Volume 11) (Amazon) January 2018

How to Be Everything: A Guide for Those Who (Still) Don’t Know What They Want to Be When They Grow Up (Amazon) May 2018

The Gifted Kids Workbook: Mindfulness Skills to Help Children Reduce Stress, Balance Emotions, and Build Confidence (Amazon) Release Date: August 2018

The Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners: Teaching the Four Essential Steps to Success (Grades 5–12) (Amazon) October 2017

UK: Redefining More Able Education: Key Issues for Schools (Amazon) April 2018

Doing Poorly on Purpose: Strategies to Reverse Underachievement and Respect Student Dignity (Amazon) January 2018

UK: Providing for the Special Needs of Students with Gifts and Talents (Amazon Kindle Edition) November 2017

Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties (Amazon) February 2018

The Cheetah Stories: Understanding the Challenges of Being Gifted

Trilogy: The School for Gifted Potentials (Amazon)

Bust Your Buts: Tips for Teens Who Procrastinate (Amazon)

If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice Exceptional (Amazon)

Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students: Helping Kids Cope with Explosive Feelings (2nd ed.) (Amazon)

Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties (Amazon)

Welcome to the Ark (Amazon)

Surviving the Applewhites (Amazon)

A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (Amazon)

Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner (Amazon)

Searching for Meaning: Idealism, Bright Minds, Disillusionment, and Hope (Amazon)

The Survival Guide for Gifted Kids: For Ages 10 and Under (Amazon)

Bright, Talented, & Black: A Guide for Families of African American Gifted Learners (Amazon)

Multicultural Gifted Education, 2nd ed. (Amazon)

Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism (Amazon)

Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary Executive Skills Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential (Amazon)

Off the Charts: Asynchrony and the Gifted Child (Amazon)

A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future (Amazon)

Exceptionally Gifted Children (Amazon)

Mellow Out, They Say If I Only Could: Intensities and Sensitivities of the Young and Bright (Amazon)

Gifted Children: Myths And Realities (Amazon)

The Mislabeled Child: Looking Beyond Behavior to Find the True Sources and Solutions for Children’s Learning Challenges (Amazon)

When the Labels Don’t Fit: A New Approach to Raising a Challenging Child (Amazon)

Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them (Amazon)

Kindling the Spark: Recognizing and Developing Musical Talent (Amazon)

Dumbing Down America: The War on Our Nation’s Brightest Young Minds (And What We Can Do to Fight Back) (Amazon)

Iowa Acceleration Scale Manual 3rd Edition (Amazon)

Parents’ Guide to IQ Testing and Gifted Education: All You Need to Know to Make the Right Decisions for Your Child (Amazon)

Genius Denied: How to Stop Wasting Our Brightest Young Minds (Amazon)

Curriculum Compacting: A Guide to Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction through Enrichment and Acceleration (Amazon)

Teaching Gifted Kids in Today’s Classroom: Strategies and Techniques Every Teacher Can Use (Amazon)

Education of the Gifted and Talented (6th Edition) (Amazon)

Jacob’s Ladder Reading Comprehension Program Set of 7, 2nd ed. (Prufrock)

Leonardo da Vinci (Amazon)

Blogs:

Blog: Gifts for Learning

Blog: Sprite’s Site

Blog: laughing@chaos

Blog: Gifted Challenges

Blog: The Deep End

Blog: Ramblings of a Gifted Teacher

Blog: Yellow Readis

Blog: My Twice Baked Potato

Blog: Institute for Educational Advancement Blog

Blog: Your Rainforest Mind

Blog: Crushing Tall Poppies

Blog: The Fringy Bit

Podcasts:

Mind Matters Podcasts

Podcast: Episode 8: A Guide to Self-Advocacy

Podcast: Episode 9: The Over-Under on Achievement

TILT Parenting Podcasts

Documentaries:

BBC Documentary: Generation Gifted

Documentary: 2e – Twice Exceptional

Documentary: RISE The Extraordinary Journey of the Exceptionally and Profoundly Gifted (Promo YouTube 7:19)

The Misdiagnosis of Gifted Children (YouTube 14:21)

Documentary: The G Word (in production)

Documentary: Breaking the Bee

Organizations:

Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented

National Society for the Gifted and Talented

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation

Belin-Blank Center

New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education

Chicago Gifted Community Center

Acceleration Institute

UNSW: GERRIC (AUS)

Other:

Google DOC: Blogs, Vlogs and Podcasts For The Gifted Community

AUS: Gifted and Talented Education Kit for Teachers (GERRIC) Free

Cybraryman’s Gifted and Talented Page

Hoagies Gifted

Byrdseed

Ginger Lewman: LifePractice Learning

Signal Fire Coaching

Image courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Using Technology to Engage GT Students

gtchat 10102017 Ed Tech

Technology can be an excellent way to engage gifted students. They can use the Internet to link to more “knowledgeable peers and experts” and collaborate on projects. Online connections can assist GT students to locate mentors who can scaffold their learning.

Tech tools can help teachers differentiate for a wider range of abilities with increasingly sophisticated programs. Technology can provide platforms for students to advance at their own pace; utilize distance learning; and engage in independent study.

Research shows that gifted and talented students use tech to do creative and  social learning activities in the classroom. Teachers can look for small changes in student engagement; this will impact student achievement. If you notice attendance is up and students want to be in your classroom, it may be because they can use tech to demonstrate proficiency.

How can technology help 2E students (i.e., Asperger’s/EFD) be more engaged in school? Many twice-exceptional (2E) kids respond well to computer programming that eliminates emotion in instruction and provides patience in interactions. Also, they can use smartphones and tablets to organize schedules and assignments.

Parents can support the use of technology in their child’s school. A student’s  technology-rich life outside of the classroom can serve to support learning that goes on at school (Siegle, 2004). Students who do not have access to computers outside of school may fall behind academically (Neuman & Celano, 2006).

Check out the links below to see what technology was most liked by chat participants.  A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Technology and the Unseen World of Gifted Students (pdf 2004)

Using Technology in Gifted & Talented Education Classrooms: The Teachers’ Perspective (pdf)

High-Tech Teaching Success! A Guide to Using Innovative Tech in Your Classroom (Prufrock Press)

Giftedness and Technology

Help Gifted and Talented Students with Technology

Is classroom technology good for learning or wasting time?

Factors Affecting School Teachers’ Perceptions of Instructional Benefits of Digital Technology (pdf)

8 Ways to Use Technology to Engage Students Better 

Is Technology Helping or Harming My Students?

Handheld Technology in the Classroom: Respecting & Meeting the Needs of All Writers 

Helping Kids Get Organized Some Suggestions for Parents (pdf)

Learning in the 21st Century: How to Connect, Collaborate & Create (Amazon)

Personal Computers Help Gifted Students Work Smart (1990)

Strategies for the Tech-Savvy Classroom (Prufrock Press)

Explore the Garden (Edufest 2017)

Using the Schoolwide Enrichment Model with Technology (Amazon)

Tech Tools & Resources to Whet Your Appetite (Slideshare)

5 New Edtech tools for Teachers

Edmodo.com

Flipgrid.com

Cybraryman’s Tech Integration for the Gifted Page

Padlet.com

iPiccy: Leveraging Thought Bubbles to Differentiate Learning (YouTube 5:21)

Wonderopolis An excellent website to support reading, writing, and curiosity (YouTube 4:20)

Shazam: Writing techniques using technology (YouTube 1:05:03)

Using Word Clouds 21st Century Gifted Students (YouTube 55:45)

Vocaroo.com

QRCode Monkey

ClassDojo.com

Aurasam.com

RemindHQ.com

Let’s Recap

Kahoot!

Doink.com

Kahn Academy

Learning Ally (2E)

Breakout EDU

Photo courtesy of Flickr   CC BY-NC 2.0

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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