Category Archives: Equity

Barriers to Women’s Achievement

Barriers for women’s achievement and career advancement are pervasive and pernicious. The belief that the ‘glass ceiling’ has been shattered is itself a barrier. Societal prejudice and stereotypes create ongoing barriers. Career advancement for women is thwarted by a lack of women in the ‘C’ suite and thus a lack of role models who advance to mid-level leadership roles. Qualities associated with leadership mimic male attributes. A long-standing barrier for women exists in a lack of access/entrance to the ‘good ole boys’ network. Networking is crucial in career advancement, but the opportunity to network with peers is lacking for women. Women are often forced with difficult decisions regarding work-life balance when pursuing their career. Limited availability for after-work obligations, travel, or training is reflected in job evaluations.

Impostor Syndrome – not feeling ‘good enough’ – affects how women react to workplace discrimination; how they choose their careers; and how they leave a career (quietly, leaving unresolved issues behind). It starts early for women and can determine what classes they take in high school and college. Reduced confidence can become a self-fulfilling effect in their lives. Internalizing, rationalizing, and avoidance of barriers reduce their chance of career advancement.

What can companies do to develop female talent within their organizations? Companies need to acknowledge ‘Second-Generation Gender Bias’ – a bias which creates an environment reflective of the values of men in the workplace, but includes subtle discrimination against women. Female talent development needs to recognize ability, ensure equitable professional development, provide access to peer-networking opportunities, and afford women affirmation through the creation of leadership identity. It is enhanced when more women are placed in leadership roles. This counters a male-oriented work culture that only values gender-based qualities and maintains the status quo.

There are many things women can do to promote gender equity including promoting discussion of gender bias in their workplace. They can be positive role models for and mentors to their female co-workers. And, self-advocacy is so important, as well. Women can build communities of support within companies where they feel safe to give candid feedback, discuss sensitive topics, and provide emotional support for each other.

Gender inequity starts early and continues throughout a woman’s life. Education of all stakeholders can make a real difference for women in the workplace. Women excel at all levels of education; grades; participation in GT programs, AP classes; and graduation rates. Yet, fail to rise to the highest levels in the corporate/academic world. Women at all ages should not be discouraged in seeking careers in male-dominated fields. Educators must acknowledge and address the ‘confidence gap’ that female students increasingly face over time in areas such as math & science. New approaches to education that can improve outcomes for women include design thinking, AI integration, and STEM equity.

There are many things that can ensure gender equity in the future including investing in lifelong learning opportunities, offering flexible work schedules and environments, and encouraging work-life balance. Gender equity in the workplace can be accomplished if companies mandate gender equity, establish a chief diversity officer, consider drawing workers from a broad diverse talent pool, and create open lines of communication.

This week we celebrated 10 YEARS of #gtchat on Twitter and were excited to welcome @DeborahMersino ~ founder and first moderator of Global #gtchat ~ as our guest!

 

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Sprite’s Site courtesy of Jo Freitag.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Resources:

6 Barriers for Women’s Career Advancement

Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers

Who Will Lead and Who Will Follow? A Social Process of Leadership Identity Construction in Organizations (pdf)

Impossible Selves: Image Strategies and Identity Threat in Professional Women’s Career Transitions (pdf)

Negotiating in the Shadows of Organizations: Gender, Negotiation, and Change (pdf)

Taking Gender into Account: Theory and Design for Women’s Leadership Development Plans (pdf)

Barriers for Women to Positions of Power: How Societal and Corporate Structures, Perceptions of Leadership and Discrimination Restrict Women’s Advancement to Authority

Gender Issues and Achievement

Women are “Bossy” and Men are “Decisive”: What Gender Stereotypes Really Mean in the Workplace and How to Overcome Them

Defining Female Achievement: Gender, Class, and Work in Contemporary Korea (pdf)

Women in the Boardroom A Global Perspective (pdf)

Top 10 Work Force Trends to Watch in the New Decade

The Future of Women at Work: Transitions in the Age of Automation

Women and the Future of Work

Women in C-suite: Navigating Invisible Obstacles

New Study Reveals 6 Barriers Keeping Women from High-Power Networking

Women in the Workplace: A Research Roundup

Girls Get Smart, Boys Get Smug: Historical Changes in Gender Differences in Math, Literacy, and Academic Social Comparison and Achievement

‘Women and Leadership: Defining the Challenges’ in Handbook of Leadership Theory and Practice (book)

Why A Post About Women Downplaying Their Awesomeness Went Viral

Additional Resources:

The Invisible Obstacles for Women

Social Norms as a Barrier to Women’s Employment in Developing Countries (pdf)

Dismantling Perceptions, Attitudes, and Assumptions: Women Leaders are Interested in Advancement

Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men (book)

The Confidence Gap

School Is Not Working for Too Many Boys and Nobody Wants to Talk About It

Feel like a fraud?

Image courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy Lisa Conrad.

Photo courtesy of Deborah Mersino.

Photo courtesy of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented.

Image courtesy of Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources (AUS).

 

Gender Issues and Achievement

For decades, females have been outperforming males academically by all measures – participation in GT/AP classes, high school and college graduation rates, and better grades. Females are more self-regulated, less distracted or prone to procrastination, more organized and better at setting goals and strategizing. Although many women suffer from Impostor Syndrome, many others do not. However, societal perceptions still hinder their success.

Males are perceived to be more difficult by their teachers and receive harsher discipline. Males are over-represented in special education programs and more likely to be identified with learning disabilities such as ASD, dyslexia, and ADHD. All this leads to reduced rates of academic success.

There are many studies regarding the role played by teacher gender in student achievement, but the findings are mixed and don’t indicate a direct correlation. Rather, other factors such as teacher expertise are more important. It has been seen that female teachers in STEM subjects in the middle school years have influence on female students, but rather as a role model. Male student achievement may be affected by the gender of their teacher in elementary school, but more from how teacher’s viewed behaviors and not specifically academics.

How does one’s gender affect academic-related mindsets? Many mindsets that are based on male dominance or risky behaviors lead to thinking academic pursuits are not so important. This increases disciplinary actions or suspensions. Society influences lead boys to think of maleness as being tougher, rebellious, and as someone who prefers to play sports.

School structure is often based on conforming behaviors, following the rules, completing assignments regardless of student interest. This often runs contrary to male prerogatives. More attention needs to be given to student voice and choice, changing disciplinary policies that remove students from the classroom, and consideration of cultural approaches to learning. Many of these issues can be minimized by providing an academic mentor.

How do women translate gains in education into gains in the workplace? Much has been written about a confidence gap for women, regardless of their academic achievements. Stereotypes must be recognized for what they are, and rejected. Male and female teachers can recognize female student academic performance beginning in the middle school years. This is especially important in math where females begin to question their abilities at this critical time. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 1PM NZDT/10 AM AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Resources:

Girls Get Smart, Boys Get Smug: Historical Changes in Gender Differences in Math, Literacy, and Academic Social Comparison and Achievement (pdf)

Sex and Genius

Why a Post about Women Downplaying Their Awesomeness Went Viral

The Confidence Gap In Men And Women: Why It Matters and How To Overcome It

Women are “Bossy” and Men are “Decisive”: What Gender Stereotypes Really Mean in the Workplace and How to Overcome Them

Gender and Genius (pdf) (Kerr)

Exploring Gender Differences in Achievement through Student Voice: Critical Insights and Analyses

Boys’ Underachievement: Male versus Female Teachers

Gender and Educational Achievement

Influences of Gender on Academic Achievement

Beyond the Schoolyard: The Contributions of Parenting Logics, Financial Resources, and Social Institutions to the Social Class Gap in Structured Activity Participation

Gender Achievement Gaps in U.S. School Districts (pdf)

Troubling Gender Gaps in Education

A Priori Model of Students’ Academic Achievement: The Effect of Gender as Moderator

Education and Gender Equality (UNESCO)

Defining Female Achievement: Gender, Class, and Work in Contemporary Korea (pdf)

The Longitudinal Effects of STEM Identity and Gender on Flourishing and Achievement in College Physics

Academic Achievement and the Gender Composition of Preschool Staff (pdf)

The Effect of Teacher Gender on Student Achievement in Primary School: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment (pdf)

Persistent Effects of Teacher-Student Gender Matches (pdf)

Teachers and the Gender Gaps in Student Achievement (pdf)

The Effect of Teacher Gender on Students’ Academic and Noncognitive Outcomes (pdf)

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Access and Equity in Gifted Programs

Gifted students, unfortunately, too often face obstacles put in place by their own schools when trying to access gifted services and programs. These may include a mismatch between assessments and services offered. School administrators, faculty and staff may express a narrow view of exactly what constitutes giftedness and an individual student’s needs having had little exposure to PD regarding gifted education. Due to budgetary constraints, schools may not have challenging coursework or materials available for GT students.

Cultural and community mindsets can also present barriers for students who are identified as gifted, but then choose not to participate in the programs fearing repercussions from friends and family. Students become aware of negative stereotypes of what it means to be ‘smart’ at a very early age. Bullying by classmates can be a real hindrance when considering whether to avail themselves of gifted services.

Arguments based on ‘anti-intellectualism’ can result in stealth discrimination. Elimination of gifted programs can actually reduce potentially beneficial services for low-income and minority students. There’s no denying the dark history of using gifted education to segregate students. However, equity can’t be achieved by denying access to students who lack the resources to access opportunities outside of traditional schools. ‘Anti-intellectualism’ often relies on false assumptions such as eliminating gifted programs will allow more resources to be given to all students or that flexible ability grouping is the same as the archaic practice of tracking; it is not.

There are many ways the educational community as a whole can increase participation of underserved GT students by investing in quality gifted and talent development programs and providing PD for teachers and staff. Schools can provide multiple avenues for students to participate in and benefit from a variety of gifted services. They can reach out to parents through the creation of support groups and by providing information about available programs.

Teachers can seek PD opportunities in gifted education and obtain gifted certification which in turn raises awareness about the existence of giftedness across all cultures and economic groups. They must consider their own cultural biases and work to eliminate those which might interfere with how they see their students and their potential abilities.

Equity in gifted education cannot be achieved without addressing gaps in the performance and opportunities for underserved students. It begins with universal screening using tests that are culturally sensitive. Schools need to be proactive when working with underserved students by reaching out to families of color and low-SES and explaining to them what services are available and for whom. All classrooms should provide culturally responsive teaching (CRT) across all disciplines and use culturally authentic and responsive materials to encourage students to identify their strengths and interests.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Academic Talent Lost to Racism and Poverty Hurts North Carolina, Speakers Say

Socioeconomic Status Dictates which Children Get into Gifted Programs

Culturally Responsive and Relevant Curriculum

Access and Equity in Gifted Programs

Effect of Local Norms on Racial and Ethnic Representation in Gifted Education

Mind Matters Podcast – Episode 21: Opening Doors to Diversity in Gifted Education

Discrimination in Gifted Education Must End

Inequities and Discrimination in Gifted Education: Why Hispanic and Black Students are Under-Represented and the Case of District U-46 (Ford) (pdf)

Addressing the ‘Gifted Gap’: Three Strategies

Equity Does Not Mean Everyone Gets Nothing: There’s a Better Way to Address New York City’s Gifted Gap

The Case for Gifted Education as an Equity Issue

Not All Gifted Children Are from Affluent Families

Recognizing, Supporting, and Nurturing Underserved Gifted Students: A Moral Imperative

Anti-Excellence Dog Whistles in the Education Media

How to Increase Access to Gifted Programs for Low-Income and Black and Latino Children

Anti-intellectualism (Wikipedia)

Gifted Education for Educators

Gifted Intervention Specialists Need to be a Visible Resource

Photo courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Performance-Based Assessments

 

Performance-based assessments provide a more realistic way of assessing skills which reflect real world lived experiences. Students need to be prepared for workplace environments that don’t rely on standardized evaluations. Employers seek out those who can demonstrate the ability to apply their skills and utilize their knowledge-base to identify and solve problems. Students need to be prepared to meet these challenges. Performance-based assessments showcase or measure a student’s use of higher order thinking and their ability to create products and complete processes.

Performance-based assessments provide a way for students to be able to apply knowledge across multiple disciplines and increase their worth as productive and valuable employees. Students learn to be contributing members to group work and able to develop viable action plans in new situations on a timely basis. Performance-based assessments make students more responsible for demonstrating what they have learned.

What are some drawbacks of performance-based assessments? These types of assessments can be difficult to conduct in larger classes as compared to standardized testing. They are more costly and time consuming which can be problematic in tight budget environments.

We know that standardized testing can affect outcomes for marginalized groups of students, but that doesn’t necessarily imply that performance-based assessments are a superior alternative. In order to better meet the needs of diverse learners, how project-based assessments are designed and implemented is a better indication that greater equity will be achieved. Performance-based assessments can benefit diverse learners when paired with technology, customization, teacher collaboration and professional development for teachers and staff.

How can teachers create performance-based assessments for their students? They must first have a clear and definable understanding of their subject matter and then be able to identify goals they intend to assess. Teachers should set course standards, be prepared to identify students’ learning gaps, design the course, provide materials and implement educational learning plans.

Performance-based assessments become authentic when they are considered meaningful and students are engaged. Consideration should be taken that the product created or final activity provides a way for students to demonstrate their understanding of the subject matter. Authentic assessments such as presentations, portfolios, performances or projects must be open-ended and open to multiple potential outcomes. A transcript of this chat is available at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Performance-Based Assessment for 21st-Century Skills (Prufrock)

Performance-Based Assessment: Reviewing the Basics

Taking Teaching to (Performance) Task: Linking Pedagogical and Assessment Practices (pdf)

Stanford: What is Performance-Based Assessment? (pdf)

What is Performance-Based Learning and Assessment and Why is it Important?

Developing Assessments of Deeper Learning: The Costs and Benefits of Using Tests that Help Students Learn (pdf)

Authentic Ways to Develop Performance-Based Activities

Performance Based Assessment

Does Performance Based Assessment Produce Better Students?

Performance Assessment and Authentic Assessment: A Conceptual Analysis of the Literature (pdf)

Connecting Performance Assessment to Instruction: A Comparison of Behavioral Assessment, Mastery Learning, Curriculum-Based Measurement, and Performance Assessment (ERIC)

Fairness in Performance Assessment (ERIC)

Guidelines for the Development and Management of Performance Assessments (ERIC)

Developing and Implementing an Assessment Plan

Program-Based Review and Assessment (pdf)

Basic Steps of Program Assessment

Performance Based Assessment & Learning (YouTube 3:08)

Performance-Based Assessment: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners

Performance Assessment: A Deeper Look at Practice and Research

Cybraryman’s Assessments Page

Image courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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