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Role of Assessment and Curriculum Design

The first consideration in assessment is best practices in the identification of GT students. It’s important to use multiple criteria when assessing and identifying GT students. Various assessments should be used at varied times. Consideration should be given to multiple talent areas. When identifying students for a GT program, measures that are relevant to available programs should be considered. Equitable processes for selection, validation and placement are important in the identification process. Consideration of instruments (tests) and other approaches should be sensitive to the inclusion of minority, ELL, low-SES and disabled students. Out-of-level assessments may need to be used and different procedures should be considered for secondary students.

There are many considerations that must be taken into consideration when designing curriculum for identified GT students. Does the curriculum provide sufficient depth, complexity, and pacing? GT students should be provided opportunities for metacognition and reflection. Will they be taught content, process, and concepts? Three characteristics of GT students critical for curriculum design include complexity, precocity and intensity. (VanTassel-Baska 2011) Motivation, persistence, interests, and access to resources and support are also important. GT students are capable of providing high-quality feedback regarding the curriculum. Will they be given sufficient voice to provide such feedback?

Appropriate learning assessments for gifted students include performance-based assessments and off-level achievement tests. Portfolios and informal assessments such as one-on-one discussion or peer-group discussions and observations are also appropriate for GT students.

The NAGC has produced national standards which list expected student outcomes. Standard 3 deals specifically with curriculum planning and instruction. We have provided links to these resources. Student outcomes include students demonstrating growth commensurate with aptitude; developing talents in talent or interest areas; and becoming independent investigators. In addition, student outcomes include developing knowledge and skills to live in a multicultural, diverse and global society; and receive benefits from gifted education that provides high quality resources and materials.

GT curriculum should provide “a means to serve not only the internal characteristics of gifted students, but also develop talent traits that are instrumental for advanced achievement. These talent traits include intellectual engagement, openness to experience, perseverance and passion for attaining long-term goals, a need for Ascending Intellectual Demand & intense focus in areas of personal and professional interests.” (Housand, A)

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

ASCD: Six Strategies for Challenging Gifted Learners

Standard 3: Curriculum Planning and Instruction

APA: What is Assessment?

SC – Gifted and Talented Best Practices Guidelines: Assessment (pdf 2018)

Developing Exemplary Gifted Developing Exemplary Gifted Programs: Programs: What does the research say? What does the research say? (pdf Stambaugh)

Alternative Assessments With Gifted and Talented Students (aff. link)

Introduction to Curriculum Design in Gifted Education (aff. link)

Assessment of Gifted and High-Ability Learners: Documenting Student Achievement in Gifted Education (aff. link)

Curriculum Planning and Instructional Design for Gifted Learners (3rd ed.) (aff. link)

Methods and Materials for Teaching the Gifted (4th ed.) (aff. link)

HK: Implementation of School-based Gifted Development Programmes

High Quality Curriculum for Gifted Learners

Texas State Plan for the Education of Gifted/Talented Students (pdf)

Gifted Learners as Global Citizens: Global Education as a Framework for Gifted Education Curriculum (pdf)

UK: What works in gifted education? (pdf)

Eight Universal Truths of Identifying Students for Advanced Academic Interventions (pdf)

Texas Performance Standards Project

Graphic courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

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Mindfulness

 

Mindfulness can mean different things to different people. It means being aware of the here and now; knowing and accepting your own abilities; and being able to respond to stress in a calm and reasoned manner. It is a willingness to be open, to consider the possibilities, and to engage in curiosity without judging (Kabat-Zinn, 2003). Two components of mindfulness are the ability to regulate your attention and to be open, accepting, and curious (Bishop et al., 2004).

How can GT students use mindfulness to cope with stress and anxiety? Mindfulness is the basis for many ancient practices … meditation, prayer … known to reduce stress and anxiety. In the classroom, it can help GT students become more self-aware, attentive, increase a sense of well-being; all things that can aid in reducing stress and anxiety.

Mindfulness can benefit teachers in developing caring and responsive classrooms. The same benefits gained by students can also be beneficial for teachers by alleviating daily stress. Mindfulness helps teachers be more attuned to the needs of students which can result in a more caring and responsive classroom.

What are some strategies for introducing mindfulness in the classroom? An emphasis on social-emotional learning (SEL) is one way to introduce mindfulness into the classroom environment. Classroom sessions dedicated to identifying stressors and ways to counter them can be a way to introduce mindfulness as well. Teachers can incorporate principles of mindfulness by cultivating inter-connectedness within the classroom, introducing movement and breathing techniques, and an appreciation for gratitude on all levels.

Teachers and parents can work together by sharing strategies to be implemented both at school and at home. This collaboration in itself will benefit GT kids. Parents of GT kids, as with all parenting strategies, must remain vigilant and be willing to consider developing sustainable ways to promote mindfulness at home.

Where can one find resources about mindfulness practices? There is an extraordinary number of resources both in print and online regarding mindfulness practices. We have included numerous resources here in this blog post. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Cybraryman’s Mindfulness Page

The Calm Schools Initiative (free app)

ClassDojo – Mindfulness

Listening, Thinking, Being Toward an Ethics of Attunement (Book)

Compassionate Critical Thinking: How Mindfulness, Creativity, Empathy and Socratic Questioning Can Transform Teaching (book)

5 Tips for Successfully Implementing a Mindfulness Program at Your School

Teachers: Use Mindfulness to Help Students’ Academics

Creating a Mindful Classroom Environment

Getting Started with Mindfulness

Using Mindfulness-Based Strengths Practices with Gifted Populations (pdf)

On the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Children (book – aff link)

Mind Matters Podcast: Episode 13 – Regulating Emotions Through Mindfulness

The Gifted Kids Workbook: Mindfulness Skills to Help Children Reduce Stress, Balance Emotions, and Build Confidence

Mindfulness on the Path of Gifted Development

Gifted Education Communicator: Implementing Mindfulness in the Classroom (Sisk)

ASCD: Mindfulness Resources

Gifted Mindfulness (website)

Planting the Seeds of Mindfulness: Creating the Conditions to Help Gifted Kids (book)

The Role of Mindful Parenting in Individual and Social Decision-Making in Children

What Gifted Kids Want Their Parents to Know

Mindfulness in the Classroom: Mindful Principles for Social and Emotional Learning (book: aff link)

Metacognition, Mindfulness, and Spiritual Well-being in Gifted High School Students (pdf)

MYmind: a Concurrent Group-Based Mindfulness Intervention for Youth with Autism and Their Parents

25 Fun Mindfulness Activities for Children and Teens (+Tips!)

Growing Up Mindful: Essential Practices to Help Children, Teens, and Families Find Balance, Calm, and Resilience (book)

Ohio Dept. of Education: Social and Emotional Learning Standards

APA: Mindfulness Resources

Photo courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Disclaimer: This post includes affiliate links.

Common Terminology in an Uncommon Field

With little experience with the concept of gifted education prior to their child being identified (unless they participated in a program themselves), most terminology is new to parents. Many teachers also have limited exposure to gifted education prior to beginning their teaching careers.

Unique terms such as overexcitabilities or the idea of perfectionism in very young children can be confusing at first. Also, terms such as cluster grouping, self-contained classrooms versus full-inclusion classrooms, and acceleration may be new to many.

Perhaps the term ‘gifted’ itself is the most controversial term in gifted education. Many educators and some parents would prefer not to use the term. Others have decidedly opposing ideas about the word’s definition. Unfortunately, this has at times slowed how the field of gifted education has responded to actually helping gifted children grow and develop their potential abilities.

What are some general education terms that are also useful in gifted education? Terms such as universal screening, pre-assessment, curriculum compacting, scaffolding, and differentiation are used universally in both fields. It’s important to understand general education terms to be a successful advocate. Educators appreciate a willingness by parents to learn the terminology and be able to engage in intelligent dialogue.

Learning the jargon or terminology aids in a parent’s understanding of what will be discussed in meetings with teachers and school personnel regarding their child’s education. Intelligently conversing with educators will gain their respect for parents and ultimately benefit the relationship for all stakeholders; especially the student.

What resources are available for learning the lingo of gifted education? Gifted organizations such as the NAGC and state websites generally provide a list or terms for both parents and educators. Resources and links to these organizations can be found below. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

CO: The Principal’s GT Handbook – A Consolidated Resource (pdf)

NAGC: Glossary of Terms

Frequently Used Terms in Gifted Education (pdf)

Gifted Education Glossary of Common Terms (pdf)

Understanding Your Gifted Child From the Inside Out: A Guide to the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Kids  (Prufrock – aff. link)

PAGE: A Glossary of Terms for Gifted Education

Acronyms, Terms, and Other Things We Need to Know

Davidson Gifted: A Glossary of Terms Used in Educational Assessment

Different Uses of the Term “Gifted”

Your Guide to Education Lingo

NAGC: Administrator Quick Guide to Gifted Education (pdf)

Dictionary of Educational Jargon

Sprite’s Site: Stories of the OEs

Reforming Gifted Education (GPP)

Davidson Gifted: The Underachievement of Gifted Students: What do we know and where do we go? (2000)

Emotional Intelligence in Gifted Students

Sprite’s Site: The G Word

Acronyms, Terms, and Other Things We Need to Know

Image generated at Wordcloud.com by Lisa Conrad.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

Individualized Education: Pipedream or Possibility?

Many educators question why a GT student should have an individualized education. When students are optimally challenged – engaging in deep dives that involve appropriate levels of advancement – they learn best. Personal learning impacts a student’s sense of self-esteem, self-awareness, and creates a feeling of competency which in turns benefits society-at-large; both socially and intellectually.

What should be included in an individualized education for a GT student (GIEP)? Fortunately, there are many examples available online that have relied on extensive research-based evidence. GIEPs should reflect the student’s strengths, needs, attainable goals; and include appropriate supports. As with IEPs, a team comprised of all stakeholders should be involved. Support provisions for GT learners are insufficient when they are simply a facsimile of the established strategies, schedules, and structures in place for the neurotypical student. Truly addressing the needs of this population necessitates a rethinking of the 5 Ps: pace, progression, personalization, programming, and purpose. (Churchville)

When considering individualized plans for twice-exceptional students, a good approach is to consider strengths before weaknesses. State plans generally consider combining GIEPs with 504 plans. These student plans need to coordinate teachers and school staff involved with both gifted and special education.

How can parents ensure continuity of services when switching school districts? Document, document, document. It can’t be stressed enough that a paper trail can solve many issues when switching between schools or out of school. Parents usually bear the burden of knowing available services of both the old and new LEAs. They must know the law (state) and their child’s rights. It is sometimes advisable to seek the advice or services of an advocate to navigate through the transition process.

Individualized education plans may not solve all issues encountered by GT students during their school years. When social-emotional challenges persist, it may be time for a change. When students fail to show continued growth during their academic career, looking beyond traditional education options such as blended learning, homeschooling, or even unschooling may be necessary.

The best eTools for individualized learning should promote communication and collaboration. GT students should be encouraged to bring team members on board rather than do all the work themselves. eTools should widen a student’s authentic audience, connect them with intellectual peers and allow for the creation of meaningful products. An individualized education should not be about spending countless hours in front of a screen. It should inherently be based on the student’s interests explorable through flexible learning experiences.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

CO: Advanced Learning Program ALP Guidance Worksheet (pdf)

CO: The Systemic Process for Implementing Standards-aligned ALPs (YouTube 41:55)

CO: Painting the Big Picture – Standards-aligned ALPs CAGT Presentation (YouTube 36:27)

CO: Writing Standards-aligned Advanced Learning Plans (ALPs) (pdf)

Gifted Individualized Education Plan Explanation (GIEP)

Gifted Individualized Education Plan Sample (Google DOC)

Simple Annotated Gifted Individualized Education Plan (pdf)

Extended Annotated Gifted Individualized Education Plan (pdf)

When Gifted Kids Move: Tips for Parents and Districts

AZ: Building Bridges with Your School and District (ppt)

Developing Exemplary Gifted Developing Exemplary Gifted Programs: Programs: What does the research say? (pdf)

Cybraryman’s Personalized Learning and Student Agency Page

Sound Advice on Personalized Learning from Six Regional Incubators

Emerging Technologies Supporting Personalized Learning

Using Technology to Personalize Learning

How to Create a Gifted Individualized Education Plan

Gifted Program Development

Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards (pdf)

Collaboration in Personalized Learning

Personalized Learning Guide: A Comprehensive Guide for Educators, Administrators, and Parents

Using Technology to Personalize Learning in K–12 Schools (pdf)

Time for a Refresh: Meet the New Google Classroom

Individualized Academic Pathways in U.S. and International Schools: Rethinking Pace, Progression, Personalization, Programming and Purpose WCGTC 2019 Presentation

Google: Manage Teaching and Learning with Classroom

Microsoft Education

Carnegie Learning MATHia for Students

DreamBox Learning

Khan Academy

TinkerCad

Google Classroom

Scratch

Webquests

Canva

CoreAtlas

Google Arts and Culture

Code.org

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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