Blog Archives

Using Technology to Engage GT Students

gtchat 10102017 Ed Tech

Technology can be an excellent way to engage gifted students. They can use the Internet to link to more “knowledgeable peers and experts” and collaborate on projects. Online connections can assist GT students to locate mentors who can scaffold their learning.

Tech tools can help teachers differentiate for a wider range of abilities with increasingly sophisticated programs. Technology can provide platforms for students to advance at their own pace; utilize distance learning; and engage in independent study.

Research shows that gifted and talented students use tech to do creative and  social learning activities in the classroom. Teachers can look for small changes in student engagement; this will impact student achievement. If you notice attendance is up and students want to be in your classroom, it may be because they can use tech to demonstrate proficiency.

How can technology help 2E students (i.e., Asperger’s/EFD) be more engaged in school? Many twice-exceptional (2E) kids respond well to computer programming that eliminates emotion in instruction and provides patience in interactions. Also, they can use smartphones and tablets to organize schedules and assignments.

Parents can support the use of technology in their child’s school. A student’s  technology-rich life outside of the classroom can serve to support learning that goes on at school (Siegle, 2004). Students who do not have access to computers outside of school may fall behind academically (Neuman & Celano, 2006).

Check out the links below to see what technology was most liked by chat participants.  A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Technology and the Unseen World of Gifted Students (pdf 2004)

Using Technology in Gifted & Talented Education Classrooms: The Teachers’ Perspective (pdf)

High-Tech Teaching Success! A Guide to Using Innovative Tech in Your Classroom (Prufrock Press)

Giftedness and Technology

Help Gifted and Talented Students with Technology

Is classroom technology good for learning or wasting time?

Factors Affecting School Teachers’ Perceptions of Instructional Benefits of Digital Technology (pdf)

8 Ways to Use Technology to Engage Students Better 

Is Technology Helping or Harming My Students?

Handheld Technology in the Classroom: Respecting & Meeting the Needs of All Writers 

Helping Kids Get Organized Some Suggestions for Parents (pdf)

Learning in the 21st Century: How to Connect, Collaborate & Create (Amazon)

Personal Computers Help Gifted Students Work Smart (1990)

Strategies for the Tech-Savvy Classroom (Prufrock Press)

Explore the Garden (Edufest 2017)

Using the Schoolwide Enrichment Model with Technology (Amazon)

Tech Tools & Resources to Whet Your Appetite (Slideshare)

5 New Edtech tools for Teachers

Edmodo.com

Flipgrid.com

Cybraryman’s Tech Integration for the Gifted Page

Padlet.com

iPiccy: Leveraging Thought Bubbles to Differentiate Learning (YouTube 5:21)

Wonderopolis An excellent website to support reading, writing, and curiosity (YouTube 4:20)

Shazam: Writing techniques using technology (YouTube 1:05:03)

Using Word Clouds 21st Century Gifted Students (YouTube 55:45)

Vocaroo.com

QRCode Monkey

ClassDojo.com

Aurasam.com

RemindHQ.com

Let’s Recap

Kahoot!

Doink.com

Kahn Academy

Learning Ally (2E)

Breakout EDU

Photo courtesy of Flickr   CC BY-NC 2.0

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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When Gifted Kids Don’t Fit In

gtchat 10032017 Fit

Explaining giftedness to a child is often overlooked; assuming they understand all the intricacies of being identified gifted. It’s important for children to understand; otherwise, they may accept myths perpetuated by society. Being gifted is more than simply academic achievement or excellence in everything. It’s knowing that it is ok to fail or be less than expected.

Anxiety can play a role in a gifted child’s need to ‘fit in’. Adults may place unfair expectations on children based on their perception of ‘gifted’ and that is hard to live up to at times. Just because a child may not ‘fit it’ doesn’t mean they don’t want to and experience anxiety trying to be something they’re not.

Asynchronous development can also affect a gifted kid’s ability to ‘fit in’. For some gifted kids, asynchronous development can severely affect their ability to engage with age-peers. It can affect how adults interact with gifted kids and perceive how they should act.

How can teachers assist gifted students with fitting in at school? It’s helpful if teachers take time to learn about giftedness; increase their understanding of these kids. Teachers’ expectations should not include using students as teacher aides which can be source of bullying for gifted child.

Parents can help to ensure a good fit in the family as well. Like teachers, parents too must take time to learn about and understand what giftedness is and isn’t. They should guard against favoritism; delegation of tasks; and resource allocation of family funds. Parents can also try to provide opportunities for positive interaction with intellectual peers beyond school walls.

Learning the difference between ‘better at’ and ‘better than’ will go a long way in getting accepted by age-peers. Gifted kids should work to understand their abilities. Positive self-image ultimately benefits in how they relate to others. Developing a sense who what’s important to them; gifted kids may decide not to go along with the crowd to fit in.

An important take-away from the chat was that although it’s natural for kids to want to fit in with age-peers; conversely, gifted kids should also learn that it’s also okay not to ‘fit in’ if they don’t want to do so. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 1 PM NZST/11 AM AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social & Emotional Needs (Amazon)

The Gifted Kids’ Survival Guide: For Ages 10 & Under (Amazon)

Gifted Children Need a Place to Belong Gifted Children Need a Place to Belong

Gifted Students Often Struggle Socially

10 Facts You May Not Know about Gifted Children But Should

Friendship 101

How to Find Friends

Young, Gifted & Likely to Suffer for It

Gifted Children & Friendships – Why Don’t I Fit In?

How to Help your Gifted Kid Thrive

The Curse of the Gifted & Talented Child

Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students

Should We Tell Them They’re Gifted?

Is Your Child Anxious Because They’re Gifted?

Guess What? Gifted Kids Can Have Problems Too

10 Lessons from Gifted Education 

How to Help Your Overthinking Gifted Child

Sprite’s Site: Discovering the Depth and Breadth of Giftedness

Sprite’s Site: Belonging – A Place of Sanctuary

What to Say to Your Gifted Child…about Being Gifted

Gifted Children’s Bill of Rights

Common Characteristics of Gifted Individuals

Hoagies’ Blog Hop May 2014: The “G” Word “Gifted”

Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

From Home Education to Higher Education

gtchat 09262017 HomeEd

Families with gifted children are one of the fastest growing segments of homeschooling today. The choice to homeschool is no longer limited to those who make the choice for religious reasons as was common in the past. Along with that choice comes the need to know and understand how to approach the college entrance process. Our guest this week, Lori Dunlap, recently wrote a book entitled From Home Home Education to Higher Education from GHF Press which addresses the many questions asked by homeschoolers.

gtchat From Home Ed to Higher Ed Front Cover

Faced with roadblocks and not having needs met at their children’s schools; parents of gifted learners often turn to homeschooling. Families realize that their school’s approach to education does not fit with their goals for their child’s education.

According to Corin Goodwin, Executive Director of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, “Homeschool families are so diverse that any generalization is going to include misconceptions.” With regard to college entrance, many people think that homeschoolers will encounter more issues in transitioning to college than their public school counterparts. This line of thinking extends to believing homeschoolers will lack the ability to deal with schedules and routines in college which simply is not the case. Corin added, “In fact, they often do better because they are self-motivated and have not had their curiosity suppressed.”

How are homeschoolers viewed by colleges and universities? Lori explained, “Colleges and universities not only accept homeschoolers; in many cases they’re actually seeking them out! In researching my book, the most FAQ that came up from admissions officers was, ‘Where can I find more homeschoolers?’ Other hurdles included misperceptions in college admissions community including “Mom grades” on transcripts and academic “rigor.”

Regarding the college application process, Lori told us, “For any student, finding schools that are a good fit for their goals and interests is the most important part of the process. In applications, admission officers want to see how homeschoolers have taken advantage of the flexibility and freedom that comes with educational choice.”

With regard to what college admission officers are looking for, Lori said, “The first thing they want to know is if the student is academically qualified and can be successful at the school. [They are also] looking for variety and diversity; an area where homeschoolers can stand out with unique educational experiences. They want to know your “story”. Think of your application as a story, with a beginning, middle, and end. Non-standard applications throw some of them for a loop. This is why SAT/ACT scores are still required for homeschoolers even at “test opt” schools.”

“Know your child. Help them set goals and steer their lives, but be ready to scaffold when needed.” ~ Corin Goodwin, Executive Director of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum

There are some ways parents can help prepare their child to transition to college life. It was pointed out by many at the chat that perhaps the hardest part, but most important  for parents, is letting go. Corin reminded us, “Parents can listen to their student instead of pushing hopes on kids. The kid has to live with their choices. They should make their own.” Lori added, “To prepare, we need to give our students increasing levels of independence and appropriate responsibility as they get older. By the time they go off to college, they should have skills and confidence to operate as independently as possible.” A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

From Home Education to Higher Education 

About Lori Dunlap at Amazon

College Admissions for Homeschoolers: 3 Inevitable Questions

College Admissions for Homeschoolers: 3 More Inevitable Questions 

Forging Paths: Beyond Traditional Schooling

Self-Directed Learning: Documentation and Life Stories

Happiest Homeschooling Moments: A Reflection

From Home Education to Higher Education: A Review

Grateful for All of It, No Exceptions: Loving the Unexpected Gifts of Giftedness

Reflections in a Pond: Recognizing Giftedness in Our Children and Ourselves

Research: From Home Ed to Higher Ed

Earning Admission: Real Strategies for Getting into Highly Selective Colleges – Review

Teach Your Own

Homeschooled Student’s Transcript Might Be for a Cat

Sprite’s Site: Socialization

Sprite’s Site: Socialization 2

Sprite’s Site: Qualified to Teach

The Uncommon Application

Cybraryman’s Homeschooling Page

GHF: Teens (and College)

GHF: US Public Education Policy: Missing Voices

Graphic  courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

The Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners

gtchat 09192017 Self Advocacy

The Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners was recently released by Free Spirit Publishing and we were excited to have the author, Deb Douglas, as our guest this week on #gtchat. It proved to be a much needed topic and drew many new participants to the chat.

One of the greatest impediments to self-advocacy for gifted learners are the adults who become over-involved. Far too often, parents and teachers are so used to advocating when kids are young; they don’t know when to stop.

gtchat Self Advocacy DD1

Self-advocacy is a part of growing up. A key benefit of teaching gifted learners to self-advocate is that it has a profound effect on a student’s later success. Gifted people in general use self-advocacy techniques throughout their lives; but they must learn them first.

Like all students, gifted learners’ educational experiences should ensure continual growth in academics and socially. They should be taught to advocate for experiences they truly want and will use.

gtchat Self Advocacy DD2

What should students consider when self-assessing their own needs prior to self-advocacy? Self-assessment needs to start early and develop into a continual process throughout their time in school. It should be combined with determining personal goals and how to meet them.

Parents play an important role in helping students become successful self-advocates. Parents are their child’s first role model. They should be consistent, positive, and empathetic to child’s needs. Students will find success as self-advocates when parents learn to allow their child to take the lead when ready.

gtchat Self Advocacy DD3

Students should first create an Action Plan. They go hand in hand with setting goals and deciding how they will be reached. Action plans should list necessary steps and a realistic timeline to reach goals. A transcript of this chat may be found at our Storify page.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners: Teaching the 4 Essential Steps to Success (Amazon)

Empower Gifted Learners to Advocate for Themselves

GT Carpe Diem

About GT Carpe Diem Consultant, Deb Douglas

Deb Douglas’ Speaker/Author Brochure (pdf)

GT Carpe Diem Workshop Brochure (pdf)

GT Carpe Diem Self-Advocacy

About Deb Douglas (Free Spirit Publishing)

GT Carpe Diem (Facebook)

Four Simple Steps to Self-Advocacy

Pre-Conference: Empowering Gifted Students’ Self-Advocacy at WATG 2017

What Makes You Unique – Fostering an Ongoing, Honest, Factual Dialogue (pdf p.23)

Living with Intensity Understanding Sensitivity, Excitability & Emotional Development of Gifted (Amazon)

When Gifted Kids Don’t Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social & Emotional Needs (Amazon)

Smart Teens’ Guide to Living with Intensity: How to Get More Out of Life and Learning (Amazon)

More Than a Test Score: Teens Talk About Being Gifted, Talented, or Otherwise Extra-Ordinary (Amazon)

Sprite’s Site: Boredom Bingo

Letting Go While Holding On and Changing BLAH to AHHHHH! (pdf) Courtesy of NAGC

Re-Forming Gifted Education: How Parents and Teachers Can Match the Program to the Child (Amazon)

Self-advocacy for Gifted Teens and Tweens: How to Help Gifted Teens Take Control of their Classroom Experience

Stepping Back from Overparenting: A Stanford Dean’s Perspective (Podcast 21:46)

Title graphic courtesy of Lisa Conard.

Photo and all other graphics courtesy of Deb Douglas.

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