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When Gifted Students Own Their Learning

gtchat 01042018 Own Learning

Student ownership of learning is when a student becomes invested in his own learning; the realization that learning is of personal value to oneself. A student’s active involvement in their own education resulting from a desire to learn connotes student ownership of learning. At the beginning of the new year, #gtchat began the discussion of what it looks like for gifted students to own their learning.

Gifted students may or may not be motivated to take ownership of their own learning contrary to popular belief. If their strengths are not academic, they may have little interest in school. Motivation to take ownership of their learning may require educators to allow #stuvoice and choice; Socratic instruction; self-reflection; less dependence on planned lessons; less testing, more requests for feedback.

One of the best examples of students owning their learning can be found in Project-based Learning – learning proposed, directed and executed by the student. A personalized approach to PBL is especially appealing to gifted students. Another example of student owned learning is the creation of digital portfolios which can showcase their work. Portfolios may take the form of blogs, videos, or displaying art/music projects. Students can take ownership of their learning by building presentation skills either something as simple as PP to participating in a performance-based environment such as a recital.

How does technology impact student ownership of learning? Technology must enhance authentic learning; not just replication of learning. Gifted students may find building a computer or robot much more valuable than simply sitting and staring at a computer screen. It can play a vital role in the ownership of learning when used as a problem-solving tool rather than ‘the’ answer. Objectives and goals need to be personalized via technology. It enhances how students collect and share information. Technology can provide a sense of community with like-minded, intellectual peers who can work together; an oft-missed opportunity for gifted students in the past.

Virtually all work does not become valuable until it is presented/showcased. Students need to learn how to best present their ideas and projects in a meaningful way. This is a precursor for professional success in life as an adult. By learning presentation skills, it takes their learning to another level – kicks it up a notch! It also hopefully provides an authentic audience for their work. This in turn amplifies their motivation factor.

Changes need to be made to curriculum and instruction to ensure students have the skills to succeed. Instruction needs to evolve into facilitation. Meaningful learning and ownership of that learning will be enhanced by teacher led deep-level, thought provoking questioning and then thoughtful listening to provide feedback. Students should be provided with an environment that encourages imagination, student choice, freedom and time to explore interests, and finally a way to showcase their learning. A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

As we enter the 7th year of #gtchat, we would like to acknowledge those people behind the scene who make it all possible!

Thank you to the TAGT staff ~

Budget TAGT Staff

And to our Advisory Board ~

Own Learning Advisory Board

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2 PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Can Students Learn Entirely on their Own?

New Experiments in Self-Teaching (TEDTalks 17:25)

School in the Cloud

The 5 Core Components of K-12 Entrepreneurship Education

World Peace Game Foundation

The Digital Transformation of Learning: Social, Informal, Self-Service, and Enjoyable

What Is Self-Directed Education?

10 Ways to Motivate Students to Take Responsibility for Their Learning

50 Ways to Empower Students in a Connected World

Getting Students to Take Responsibility for Learning

Creating Pupils Who take Responsibility for their Own Learning

5 Ways to Increase Student Ownership in Your Classroom

When Students Drive Learning, They Can Do So Much More

Cybraryman’s Student-Centered Classrooms Page

Self-Directed Learning: Documentation and Life Stories (GHF Press)

What Makes an ‘Extreme Learner’?

Cybraryman’s Presentation Tools Page

Cybraryman’s Games in Education Page

Genius Hour: Passion Projects that Ignite Innovation and Student Inquiry (Amazon)

Meet the #SinglePointRubric

New Tech Network’s Revised Oral Communication and Collaboration Rubrics

Ginger Lewman’s LifePractice PBL

Genius Hour/20% Time Livebinder

Resonate: Present Visual Stories that Transform Audiences (Amazon)

Stop Telling your Kids that School Will Prepare them for Life

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Extending Student Voice to Gifted Students

gtchat-02142017-student-voice

Accepting input from students concerning their education has become an important part of moving education forward today. Student voice isn’t necessarily spontaneous, and may need to be nurtured in students. It can be nurtured by creating positive student-teacher relationships. Student voice ‘doesn’t need adults to agree with it, incite it, define it, or appreciate it’. (Soundout.org) Student voice acknowledges and values what students are saying. It can empower students to become engaged in their learning and life.

“Student voice is empowering students to take charge of their education. It is powerful self-reflection. It motivates learning.” ~ CW Gifted Teacher

The role played by ‘respect’ when implementing student voice can’t be underestimated. When teachers listen to students, they show that what the student says is important; it shows respect. Respect is, however, a two-way street and student voice encourages all parties to listen and to value each other.

“Students need to know that what they have to say doesn’t need to be moderated or edited. Acknowledge their voice and respect by letting it go out into the wild without moderating or criticizing.” ~ Kimberley Moran, Education Writer and GT Teacher

In what way can student voice be promoted and improved in the classroom and schools? It can be promoted by taking time to welcome feedback through surveys and  by allowing students a say in classroom routines which can encourage them to provide their voice in class. Schools can improve the richness of student voice by actively responding to student concerns and suggestions.

Each student is unique and their ability, once identified, can play a significant role in how they express themselves. Higher-order thinking and deeper understanding of their environment can enhance a gifted student’s voice.

Yet, the question remains; how much voice should gifted students have in their educational options? Gifted students often have more options to consider and their voice plays an implicit and necessary role. It may not be about how much, but rather enough voice that they understand their investment in the process.

Student voice is a valuable concept in education today and must be acknowledged by teachers and administrators. It can reap rewards both in the classroom and for the student’s personal development. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 14.00 NZST/12.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Sound Out

Activating Student Voice Empowers Learning (pdf)

Student-Centered Learning with a Learning Platform (pdf)

School Voice Report 2016 (pdf)

Successful Education Requires a Stronger Student Voice

Three Ways Student Voice Can Elevate Motivation and Engagement

Motivation, Engagement & Student Voice (pdf)

Motivation, Engagement & Student Voice Toolkit (pdf)

A Model for Student Voice

How to Use Student Voice to Improve Engagement

Student Engagement and Vision

Student Gets ‘Seat at the Table’ on School’s Decision-Making Council 

Do You Know Me? The Voice of a Disgruntled Student in a Boring Class

Student Voice: Inspiring and Empowering Students to Take Charge of their Education 

Cybraryman’s Student Voice Page

Cybraryman’s What Students Want Page

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Student Voice: Listening to Gifted Learners

“Research shows that dropout rates, student achievement, and workforce readiness will improve by integrating student voices in the classroom and in society.” StudentVoice.org

This week at Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT, we chatted about involving students in their own learning. The Student Voice movement, founded by Zak Malamed, is an important initiative to foster student participation in the educational process and now includes a Twitter chat #stuvoice on Mondays at 8:30 PM ET.

Zak Malamed Head ShotZak Malamed

Nikhal Goyal, an outspoken proponent of listening to students, will be a keynote speaker at this year’s TAGT 2014 Conference in Fort Worth in December. Nikhal is the author of One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student’s Assessment of School.

Nikhil Goyal PicNikhal Goyal

Chat participants considered what students would like educators to know. Comments included that students want to be challenged in the classroom, to be able to try it their way without being worried if the fail at first and to have their passions respected. A full transcript may be found at Storify.

gtchat thumbnail logoGlobal #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered byTAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Student Voice (website)

One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student’s Assessment of School by Nikhil Goyal

Nikhil Goyal one size book

3 Ways We Stifle Student Voice(s)

Listen to Your Students You Will Learn Alot!

Connected Learning: Tying Student Passions to School Subjects

Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design

Cybraryman’s Self-Determined Learning Genius Hour Page

3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching from Edutopia

Cybraryman’s Exit Slips Page

What Students Want from Teachers 

Cybraryman’s What Students Want Page

Cybraryman’s Student Tech Help Page

Students Want More Say in District Accountability Plan Process 

Newark Students Vow More Action

Ultimate Learning Environment Encouraging Student Voice in Classroom Design

Four Meaningful Ways Students Can Contribute

The Scary Thought of Letting Students Lead a Discussion

New Ways We Share the Narratives of Our Lives

 

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