Blog Archives

Building Perseverance in Today’s GT Students

 

Our guest this week was Dr. Laila Sanguras, educator, lecturer, author. Dr. Sanguras is a former middle school teacher. Her interest in perseverance stemmed from observing her students balk at challenging activities in school, yet excel despite struggling in areas outside of school. She received her doctorate in educational psychology from the University of North Texas.

Perseverance conjures up terms such as persistence, tenacity, and determination; all qualities we believe are necessary for success. But is there more to it? Perseverance can be a path forward to having a meaningful purpose in one’s life. It may develop through both positive and negative experiences. Perseverance is shaped by passion and guided by experience. It is voluntary action in the presence of challenges and in spite of difficulties.

Instilling the need for perseverance in GT students is often overlooked. It is assumed that it is already a natural characteristic, but this is not the case; far from it. Understanding that perseverance means learning and growth can come from both negative and positive experiences is a key factor in being successful. It is a lesson GT students must be taught. For GT students, perseverance enhances talent and intelligence. It is a driving force in achievement and how goals are met.

Passion drives perseverance; and as such, it is extremely important to identify one’s passions early and often. It comes from exposure to new ideas. This is especially true for younger children. Passion sparks curiosity and helps one to see the possibilities of pursuing goals.

What are some strategies to use to intentionally teach perseverance? It’s important to realize that avoidance behavior and refusal to work may be signs of frustration and GT students are not immune to these behaviors. It is an innate part of an educator’s nature to scaffold struggling students, but the need may not be so apparent with GT students. Many need to learn frustration tolerance and teachers should be aware of it and quickly intercede. Teaching perseverance involves nurturing abilities and purposefully providing opportunities for students to be successful. Emphasis should be placed on the importance of challenge and the rewards that come from success.

Students can cultivate perseverance on their own. It begins with exploring and identifying interests followed by pursuing those interests. It’s important for students to clarify what their goals are; what has meaning for them based on their abilities and personal needs. Trying new experiences, surrounding oneself with others who persevere, being vigilant about self-care, and acknowledging personal accomplishments all contribute to building perseverance in one’s own life.

Parents have an intricate role to play in guiding their children to persevere in life. They need to model resilience and focus on their child’s need for independence. Parents need to be realistic about their child’s abilities and not require them to be perfect. They should encourage their children to forge ahead regardless of the outcome; imagine life when they achieve their goals; but, emphasizing that they may not always excel in all areas of life.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Disclaimer: Some resources include affiliate links.

Grit in the Classroom: Building Perseverance for Excellence in Today’s Students | Prufrock Press (Aff. Link)

Educator’s Quick Reference Guide to Grit in the Classroom | Prufrock Press (Aff. Link)

Raising Children With Grit: Parenting Passionate, Persistent, and Successful Kids (Vimeo 45:58)

Raising Children With Grit: Parenting Passionate, Persistent, and Successful Kids | Prufrock Press (Aff. Link)

Seven Ideas to Build Perseverance in Students

The Science of Resilience: How to Teach Students to Persevere

Teaching Students to Persevere

Building Teamwork and Perseverance in Early Elementary Students with Breakouts | MindShift

Perseverance Activity Classroom Guidance Lesson

Teach Students to Persevere During Tough STEM Challenges

And Still We Teach (blog) | Laila Sanguras

Teaching Persistence to Gifted Students

Grit and Giftedness: Four Ways to Encourage Perseverance in Gifted Children

What Your Gifted Child Won’t Learn from Academics

Frisco ISD: Independence Art Teacher Models Perseverance

Supporting Your Gifted Child during COVID: Focus On Growth and Take a Step Back

Teaching Kids to Fail Well: The Perseverance Paradox

Perseverance & Persistence: Friendly Banter with Temple Grandin

Cybraryman’s Motivational Sayings Page

‘Grit Is in Our DNA’: Why Teaching Grit Is Inherently Anti-Black | EdWeek

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Photo courtesy of Dr. Laila Sanguras.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

Guest: Celi Trépanier, Author of ‘Educating Your Gifted Child How One PS Teacher Embraced Homeschooling’

Celi-Trepanier-Image-150x120

Celi Trépanier

 

Author, Celi Trépanier, joined us this week to chat about her new book Educating Your Gifted Child How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling from Gifted Homeschoolers Forum Press. It is part of their Perspectives in Gifted Homeschooling Series. Celi also blogs at Crushing Tall Poppies which chronicles her journey as the parent of three gifted sons and as a new homeschooler.

 

Celi Trepanier Educating Your Gifted Child Book Cover

In her own words, Celi writes, as “a homeschooling mom, and a former public school teacher, I’ve been on both sides of the fence of education, gifted education, homeschooling, and gifted children.” Throughout the chat, it was clear that she is a fierce advocate for the rights of all children to receive an appropriate education that meets their needs and for teachers to be given support to make that happen.

In response to the question – Could traditional schools make any changes to better meet the needs of gifted learners? – Celi said, “Yes. A huge transformation is needed to meet current needs. We need to return education back to our teachers and parents.” Others agreed that much would have to change to address the gifted learner in public schools …

“Yes, but it would require LOTS of training and finding the proper teachers to do so.” ~ @yesteach, an elementary gifted ed teacher and specialist from Texas

“It is time to move out of the industrial age of education.” ~ @MrGelston, math educator from Massachusetts

“Identifying busy work and eliminating it. Making sure what kids do has real meaning.” ~ @Create_Miracles, gifted coach from Colorado

“Take back the classroom. Educate our administrators as well as to needs of gifted learners AND educate our elected officials for the need. Funding is pitiful for the specialist and teacher training.” ~ @teachfine, gifted specialist from Alabama

“I worry that we see education as working for most. I think it works for few. How do we stop conceptualizing reform as for the edges?” ~ @ProfBrandelyn, teacher educator from Ohio

There are signs to look for when traditional school is not working for a gifted children. Among those mentioned included boredom, depression, acting out, fear of failure, refusing to go to school, and unhappiness. Parents should watch for children becoming reticent about sharing news from school and for mood swings.

The decision to homeschool should not be taken lightly. Celi suggested, “Each family likely will have its own unique list of factors to consider like finances, time commitment, state laws, and feasibility.” Mr. Gelston asked, “Can you let go of traditional learning and move to a child centered model based on passion?” Everyone agreed that the child should be a part of the decision with one exception; when a child is in an abusive situation, but too young to know.

GHF 10th Anniversary Logo

Resources for homeschooling today are endless (Celi Trépanier) and can be found practically everywhere. Online, Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has an extensive array on their website. Libraries, museums and science centers all offer classes and chances for homeschoolers to socialize. Many areas have homeschool cooperatives where children can learn subjects from experts. And we appreciated the sentiment shared by GHF Executive Director, Corin Goodwin, ” Actually, I think #gtchat is a pretty darned good resource, too!” A full transcript may be found at Storify. Questions for this chat were posted to our Facebook Page.

Have you decided to homeschool your gifted child? We would love to hear your story and the reasons you made this decision. Please leave a comment below!

gtchat thumbnail logoGlobal #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling (Amazon)

Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling

Celi Trépanier’s Author Page at Gifted Homeschoolers Forum

Crushing Tall Poppies (Celi’s Blog)

Crushing Tall Poppies (YouTube)

Celi Trépanier on Pinterest

Crushing Tall Poppies (Facebook)

Educating Your Gifted Child by Celi Trépanier Preview

My Interview with Celi Trépanier

Book Review: Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling

I Thought Homeschooling My Kids Would Be Simple. I Was Wrong.

TED Talk: How Schools Kill Creativity

Class Dismissed – The Movie

Report: # & % Children Ages 5-17 Who Were Homeschooled 2011-12

Learnist For Teachers: 5 Homeschool Resources

Cybraryman’s Homeschool Page

A Call For Homeschool 2.0

The Techies Who Are Hacking Education by Homeschooling Their Kids

The “Horse Story” of Gifted Education

{Book Review} “Educating Your Gifted Child” from Pamela Price

 

Photos/graphics courtesy of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum.

Student Voice: Listening to Gifted Learners

“Research shows that dropout rates, student achievement, and workforce readiness will improve by integrating student voices in the classroom and in society.” StudentVoice.org

This week at Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT, we chatted about involving students in their own learning. The Student Voice movement, founded by Zak Malamed, is an important initiative to foster student participation in the educational process and now includes a Twitter chat #stuvoice on Mondays at 8:30 PM ET.

Zak Malamed Head ShotZak Malamed

Nikhal Goyal, an outspoken proponent of listening to students, will be a keynote speaker at this year’s TAGT 2014 Conference in Fort Worth in December. Nikhal is the author of One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student’s Assessment of School.

Nikhil Goyal PicNikhal Goyal

Chat participants considered what students would like educators to know. Comments included that students want to be challenged in the classroom, to be able to try it their way without being worried if the fail at first and to have their passions respected. A full transcript may be found at Storify.

gtchat thumbnail logoGlobal #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered byTAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Student Voice (website)

One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student’s Assessment of School by Nikhil Goyal

Nikhil Goyal one size book

3 Ways We Stifle Student Voice(s)

Listen to Your Students You Will Learn Alot!

Connected Learning: Tying Student Passions to School Subjects

Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design

Cybraryman’s Self-Determined Learning Genius Hour Page

3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching from Edutopia

Cybraryman’s Exit Slips Page

What Students Want from Teachers 

Cybraryman’s What Students Want Page

Cybraryman’s Student Tech Help Page

Students Want More Say in District Accountability Plan Process 

Newark Students Vow More Action

Ultimate Learning Environment Encouraging Student Voice in Classroom Design

Four Meaningful Ways Students Can Contribute

The Scary Thought of Letting Students Lead a Discussion

New Ways We Share the Narratives of Our Lives

 

The Role of Teacher Perspective in Educating Gifted Students

“How much does a teacher’s attitude about giftedness affect their teaching of gifted students?” was the first question we considered in this chat. There seemed to be general agreement that it plays a major role in meeting or not meeting the needs of identified gifted learners. The moderator pointed out that gifted students are the ‘group’ of students making the least progress among all groups and that teachers and administrators needed to be made aware of this fact. It was also pointed out that teacher attitude towards gifted children is responsible for a great deal of friction with parents.

A lesser known issue was discussed concerning the interaction between teachers of gifted students and the rest of the faculty. Too often gifted teachers feel isolated. Teachers in Pull-Out Programs may have little interaction with faculty or staff. Negative attitudes based on misplaced views of gifted students spill over into school policy which also affects them.

Suggestions on how to improve the situation included more courses for pre-service teachers in gifted education at the undergraduate level, gifted certification for any teacher involved in teaching gifted students, providing information about giftedness to general education teachers and on-going professional development in gifted education. A full transcript of the chat may be found here.

Links:

Teacher Perspectives Regarding Gifted Diverse Students

Characteristics/Competencies of Teachers of Gifted Learners: Hong Kong Teacher Perspective (pdf)

Teaching Strategies to Educate Gifted Children (Slideshare)

Teachers’ Attitudes Towards the Gifted: The Importance of P.D. & School Culture (pdf)

Journal of the World Council for Gifted & Talented Children Aug/Dec 2011 (pdf) (multiple articles)

Experimenter Expectations

Pygmalion Effect (Wikipedia)

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