Blog Archives

Locating Age-Appropriate Books for High Ability Learners

M3352M-1009Young Reader*

Locating age-appropriate books for high ability learners can prove difficult  for several reasons. Asynchronous development may mean that a very young child could comprehend reading material well beyond what may be considered appropriate for their age. As Lisa Van Gemert of American Mensa pointed out, interest levels and sensitivities also play important roles when finding appropriate yet challenging books for these children. Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources commented that material deemed appropriate for a child’s chronological age might be considered too simplistic and unsatisfying to the child. Leslie Graves, President of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, noted that the depth of thought embedded in the content and the pace of information offered would also make many leveled offerings inappropriate as well.

Young reader black and whiteChild Reading**

Reading patterns found in gifted readers can be different than those of typical readers. These kids often start reading earlier than their age peers and demonstrate deeper comprehension of what they read. Kate B.  stated they may be self taught, read faster and be voracious readers.  Justin Schwamm, Latin teacher at Tres Columnae, related that many gifted learners read and enjoy multiple books at once; which can drive others crazy. Moderator, Lisa Conrad, added that it’s still important to respect the developmental process and allow a child to enjoy reading at various levels. Parents should resist the urge to ‘push’ a child to read simply because they excel in other academic areas.

Parent readingParent Reading to Child*

Reading to children was still considered an important role of both the parent and teacher even after children were reading well on their own. Jerry Blumengarten, well known content curator Cybraryman and former teacher, remembered family reading time as enjoyable and an important time to be set aside even after children were reading. When he taught Language Arts, his 9th grade students loved when he read dramatically to them. Jayne Frances reminded us that reading aloud is important for pronunciation of words and sharing more precise or alternate definitions than those gleaned from context. Many also related the importance of emotional bonding that occurs when adults read to children whether it was a parent or teacher.

The popular school reading program ‘Accelerated Reader’ did not fare well in the opinions of many at this chat. This program seemed out-of-sync with high ability learners. Justin Schwamm told us that he was not a fan because extrinsic rewards for an intrinsically-valuable task are problematic at best.

Questions for this chat are here  and a full transcript of this chat can be found at Storify. Links from the chat and additional links are below.  Thank you to all chat participants who shared links with us.

gtchat thumbnail logoGlobal #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered byTAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Search Book Titles by Conceptual/Vocabulary Difficulty Age from Armadillo Soft

67 Books Every Geek Should Read to Their Kids Before Age 10

Some of My Best Friends Are Books: Guiding Gifted Readers (Amazon)

Guiding the Gifted Reader (1990)

Reading Lists for Your Gifted Child from Hoagies Gifted

Best-Loved Books: A Unique Reading List for Gifted Students Grades 6-12 (pdf)

Book List for Very Young Precocious Readers (link on bottom right of page)

Book List for Pre-teen Gifted Readers from Suki Wessling

The Challenge of “Challenged Books” Gifted Child Today Magazine Spring, 2002

GT-World Reading Lists

Books for Young Readers from the MN Council for the Gifted & Talented

Appropriate Content for Gifted Readers from Duke TIP

13 Age-Appropriate Books for Young Gifted Readers

Gifted 101: Choosing Books for Your Young Gifted Reader

3 Reasons I Loathe Accelerated Reader from Lisa Van Gemert, The Gifted Guru

Dear Google, You Should Have Talked to Me First from Jen Marten

Reading Lists from Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources

Appropriate Expectations for the Gifted Child from SENG

Slow Down and Look at the Pictures

Early Literacy Page from Cybraryman

Mensa Foundation Excellence in Reading

What Should I Read Next 

Reading List for Key Stage 1 Gifted Readers (pdf) from Potential Plus UK

Reading and Literacy Skills Page from Cybraryman

Books Page from Cybraryman

Newbery Medal Winners 1922 – Present 

Caldecott Medal and Honor Books 1938 – Present

Mrs. Ripp Reads

Additional Links:

Orientation (The School for Gifted Potentials Book 1) by Allis Wade

Revelations (The School for Gifted Potentials Book 2) by Allis Wade

Gifted Readers and Young Adult Literature: A Perfect Match from Duke TIP

Book Lists from Davidson Institute for Talent Development

The Gifted Reader’s Bill of Rights (pdf) by Bertie Kingore

Mind the Gap: Engaging Gifted Readers 

Resources for the Middle School Gifted Reader 

Books for Gifted Readers (Middle School)

Reading Projects for Gifted and Talented Students

Just Because They Can Doesn’t Mean They Should: Choosing Age-Appropriate Books for Literature Circles

*Photos: Courtesy of morgueFile

** Photo: Courtesy of Pixabay

Advertisements

Common Myths of Gifted Education Part 2

Gifted Education Elitist venspiredPhoto courtesy of Venspired.com  (all rights reserved)

This chat was the second part in a series, “Common Myths of Gifted Education”. It became apparent soon after chat started that these myths evoke strong emotions in all stakeholders in the gifted community. A full transcript can be found here. To view the post from Week 1, click here.

I’ve included below some of the comments made during the chat.

In response to the myth – ‘gifted education programs are elitist’:

Lisa Van Gemert @gifted_guru “There is nothing more unequal than the equal treatment of unequal people” ~ Thomas Jefferson. GT kids are qualitatively different.

Krissy Venosdale @venspired  R5) Different not better.Needs met, not privileged.Elitism insinuates the idea that it’s a “prize.” Real prize? Understanding.

Krissy Venosdale @venspired  R5) I like to tell people that we need to stop focus on high-achieve and focus more on thinking deep.

In reference to the possibility of a child being twice-exceptional: StemMom Advocate  R6: head in fire, feet in ice. Nothing fits.

Please note that our next chat will be Sunday, January 26, 2014 @ 4P ET/3P CT/21.00 UK/Monday 8.00 AUS (ET). We will be having one chat a month at this new time.

Links:

Ensuring that Diverse Learners Participate in Gifted Education Programs & Services 

Identifying Gifted Children from Diverse Populations 

Classroom Instruction & Teacher Training for Gifted Students from Diverse Populations

Diversity Focus in the NAGC-CEC Teacher Preparation Standards in Gifted Education

Optimizing the Potential of Gifted, Low-Income African American Students: Lessons Learned (pdf)

To Be Gifted and Learning Disabled: Strategies for Helping Bright Students with LD, ADHD and More (book)

Designing Services & Programs for High-Ability Learners A Guidebook for Gifted Education (book)

Critical Issues in the Identification of Gifted Students with Co-Existing Disabilities

Gifted But Learning Disabled: A Puzzling Paradox 

Gifted Children with Learning Disabilities: A Review of the Issues 

LD Gifted and Talented 

Bright Kids, Poor Grades & What You Can Do about It 

Poor Results for High Achievers 

Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 8” from Jo Freitag on  Sprite’s Site 

Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 6” from Jo Freitag on Sprite’s Site 

Cybraryman’s Twice-Exceptional Children

The Dyslexic Advantage (Amazon) by Drs. Brock and Fernette Eide

The Advantages of Acceleration by Lisa Van Gemert

Gifted and Talented – High Intelligence is a Special Need – So Treat It That Way

Conquering Cognitive Weariness with Guest, Lisa Van Gemert

Lisa Van Gemert

Always a conference favorite, Lisa Van Gemert joined us to talk about cognitive weariness, aka ‘boredom’ in the classroom. Lisa, the Gifted Guru, is the Gifted Youth Specialist for American Mensa. Their new Twitter handle is @MensaGT.

So, how exactly does Lisa define ‘cognitive weariness’? “Cognitive weariness is like the French ennui – existential boredom – specifically with regard to school work. Cognitive weariness hits when we have what one researcher called the “shriek of unused capacities.” The gifted are more prone to cognitive weariness because boredom is a root cause, and they are so often bored.”

When asked “What strategies can teachers use to counteract boredom?”, Lisa was prepared with a fantastic list of strategies. #1 Decrease predictability. Don’t run the class in the same pattern every day. #2 Decrease monotony. Don’t do the same thing for very long – no more than fifteen minutes, even in high school. #3 Increase choice. Feelings of confinement lead to boredom, and mental confinement counts, too. #4 Decrease distractions. That kid’s tapping pencil is increasing boredom in other kids. Little known, but true. #5 Accurately and consistently match ability with work level. Goldilocks the work. A full transcript may be found here.

You can find Lisa Van Gemert at TAGT 2013 in Houston, December 4th to 6th. She’s speaking with Brian Housand Thursday at 10:30 AM, Thursday at 12:15 PM and twice on Friday. All of her presentations are ‘not to be missed’.

Links:

Lisa Van Gemert’s  @gifted_guru Website ‘Gifted Guru

Lisa Van Gemert’s presentations on Slideshare

Lisa Van Gemert Gifted Youth Specialist @AmericanMensa

Lisa Van Gemert’s Pinterest Page 

Living on Edge of Chaos Podcast Ep 5 Chat w/Lisa Van Gemert from @coffeechugbooks

Lit From Within: Motivation and the Gifted Learner’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

Beyond Boredom (understanding and conquering the ‘b’ word)’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

Differentiation in the GT Classroom’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

The Creativity Prescription’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

Perfection{ism} An Occupational Hazard of Giftedness’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

The Gift of Self’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

Gifted Overview’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

Grouping without Fear’ from @gifted_guru on Slideshare

The Five-Headed Dragon – Threats to Giftedness’ (pdf) from @gifted_guru

Heart Over Head: Emotional Intelligence and the Gifted Learner” from @gifted_guru on Prezi

Deliberate Excellence: The Power of Effective Classrooms” from @gifted_guru on Prezi

Cybraryman’s MakerEd Page

Cybraryman’s GeniusHour Page 

Flipsnack ~ A place for showcasing student work

Reaching New Heights in Gifted Education PAGE 2013 Conference

PAGE Logo

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented extends its thanks to PAGE (Pennsylvania Association for Gifted Education) for hosting #gtchat at their Annual Conference in Pittsburgh.

Throughout the conference, all sessions were visited by the moderator and then tweeted for the benefit of conference attendees to enhance their experience, and for those who were unable to attend this year. Tweets included not only information from the presentations, but also background on each of the presenters as well as other presentations and projects in which they were involved.

PAGE provided the moderator with a central location at the conference to serve as a resource for anyone wanting to sign-up for and learn more about Twitter, prior to #gtchat on Friday. All of the information tweeted ~ including the keynote ~ can be searched on Twitter at #PAGE13 and clicking ‘All” at the top of the search results page.

A highlight of the conference was the keynote by Lisa Van Gemert, Youth Specialist with American Mensa. As a former teacher, administrator and parent of three gifted sons, her presentation, “The Five-Headed Dragon: Threats to Giftedness”, combined her wit and extraordinary life-experiences to connect with the audience in a deep, personal way. Twitter provided a unique record of Lisa’s keynote. If you ever have the opportunity to be at a conference with Lisa, make sure to attend her session. You’ll be glad you did!

PAGE Van Gemert Large

Lisa Van Gemert at PAGE Conference

Another popular presenter, East Carolina University Assistant Professor Dr. Brian Housand, spoke at two packed sessions about “Technology with Purpose: The Gifted Learner Connection”. Providing educators with practical tips on using technology in their classrooms, Brian reviewed a myriad of tools to enhance the quality of education necessary for today’s tech-savvy gifted student. As a member of Global #gtchat’s Advisory Board, he referred to the benefits of our Twitter chat in his presentation, noting the global collaboration which goes on each week.

Friend of #gtchat, Erik Schwinger of the Davidson Institute for Talent Development, presented, “Get Out of the Classroom! The Value of Service Learning and Social Entrepreneurship.”  Erik explained that it is important to provide gifted students with avenues to make a positive impact in their communities. These experiences can become a venue for teaching executive skills such as leadership, task commitment, organization, civic responsibility and communication.

Behind the scenes with Lisa Van Gemert, Dr. Brian Housand and Erik Schwinger waiting for #gtchat to start.

Behind the scenes with Lisa Van Gemert, Dr. Brian Housand and Erik Schwinger waiting for #gtchat to start.

Global #gtchat would like to especially thank Mrs. Cynde Frederick for her role in bringing #gtchat to the PAGE Conference. Her forward-thinking involvement in conference planning included providing each attendee with a (sponsored) flash-drive loaded with materials from all the conference presentations including the new #gtchat flyer from TAGT. Cynde was also instrumental in holding the conference at Robert Morris University which provided free Wi-Fi to all attendees and technical support to presenters. This made connecting people to Twitter a simple process.

PAGE Cynde Frederick

Utilizing Twitter at conferences is a great way to extend the experience for conference attendees. With multiple sessions being offered, it is impossible to attend all of them; but easy to follow updates on Twitter. Saved hashtag searches can create a permanent record of tweets and the links they contain. Background information about presenters further enhances the value of tweeting your conference. So, consider Twitter when you’re planning your next conference!

gtchat-square__4_

%d bloggers like this: