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Emotional Intelligence

gtchat 08022016 Emotional Intelligence

 

Emotional Intelligence can be defined as “the capacity to reason about emotions and emotional information, and of emotions to enhance thought.” (See here.) Emotional Intelligence is understanding emotions … both your own and others; and ultimately how to manipulate emotions. It is not simply being happy, optimistic, agreeable or even motivated … the fodder of self-help gurus. Being able to control emotions can aid in critical thinking and problem-solving under critical circumstances.

 

Linda Lantieri: Excerpt from the 2013 Bridging Hearts & Minds of Youth conference (YouTube 8:37)

Since being introduced in the early 1990s, the idea of teaching emotional intelligence has been debated in much the same way the existence of ‘gifted’ has been questioned. Is it nature or nurtured? Most would agree that it can be taught to some extent and any attempt to do so may produce modest, but appreciable benefits.

“Emotional Intelligence is discerning which emotions and actions are deemed appropriate for any given situation.” ~ Kristine Reese, ELP Coordinator

Emotional Intelligence is good for all students, but how important is it for gifted children? Emotional Intelligence is often equated with success that may elude gifted students without it. Raising emotional intelligence, even slightly, can sometimes counter the effects of being highly sensitive.

What differences can be seen between people with low and high Emotional Intelligence? People with low Emotional Intelligence characteristically are demanding, confrontational, egotistical, and stubborn. It is seen in people who are resistant to change, critical of others, and unreasonable. High Emotional Intelligence appears as someone who is ambitious, persuasive, and consistent. It is characterized as being enthusiastic, decisive and willing to listen to others.

“As teachers, we can help students develop Emotional Intelligence by modeling and giving opportunities to practice.” ~ Terri Eichholz, TX teacher of K-5 gifted students

To develop a basic Emotional Intelligence, a person must be willing to take the time to reflect on their own emotions. Developing Emotional Intelligence involves recognizing periods of extreme emotions and learning how to deal with them.

Finally, is there a downside to encouraging emotional intelligence in adults?  People who have a greater control of their own emotions can disguise their emotions better. Being able to read others’ emotions allows one to also manipulate, even against best interests, other people.

Emotional Intelligence is associated with success and most often, well-being. It is important for children to be able to assess their emotions and understand how to best develop them to meet their own goals. Adults can assist is nurturing it through role-modeling and talking to children honestly about it. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

 

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon (12.00) NZST/10.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

What is Emotional Intelligence (EQ)?

Emotional Intelligence: New Ability or Eclectic Traits? (pdf 2008)

What Emotional Intelligence Is and Is Not

Tachykinesics—Those Fleeting Behaviors That Say So Much

3 Mistakes That Can Keep You from Living an Authentic Life

3 Ways Emotional Intelligence Can Save Your Relationship

The Socially Savvy: Can the clueless boost their emotional IQ?

How Focus Changed My Thinking about Emotional Intelligence

EQ (Emotional Intelligence)

Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ (Amazon)

10 Qualities of People with High Emotional Intelligence

Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence

Emotions Matter Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence (pdf)

The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

Mindful Kids

How to Teach Your Kids about the Brain

Cybraryman’s EQ – Emotional Intelligence Page

Links with historical context:

Perceiving Affective Content in Ambiguous Visual Stimuli: A Component of Emotional Intelligence (pdf 1990)

Emotional Intelligence: Imagination, Cognition & Personality Salovey/Mayer (pdf 1990)

Emotional Intelligence & the Construction and Regulation of Feelings (pdf 1995)

Emotional Intelligence Meets Traditional Standards for an Intelligence (pdf 1999)

 

Photo courtesy of Pixabay   CC0 Public Domain 

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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How Has Neuroscience Changed the Way We View Giftedness?

Neuroscience giftedness

It was evident even before this discussion began that the topic of neuroscience and giftedness could not be covered in a single hour chat. However, it proved to be interesting to at least scratch the surface.

The role of IQ testing in the identification process used by many schools to determine entrance into gifted programs was seen as just a small part of what should be a comprehensive assessment. The nature of IQ test results enhances the need for appropriate challenge in the classroom at the earliest years.

Researchers believe a more nuanced approach to giftedness must go beyond reliance on domain-specific abilities. Mary Cay Ricci, an educational consultant from Maryland, reminded us that it is “important to remember that cognitive assessment only measures developed ability.” However, Margo Flower, an elementary teacher from British Columbia, also pointed out, “IQ testing provides a mindful approach to our interventions [and] without it, potential may not be recognized; [but] squashed, squandered.” According to Corin Goodwin, “IQ testing is problematic because [it’s] so badly misused and results misunderstood.”

When the question concerning how environment influences the development of giftedness was raised, it was quickly noted by many that giftedness and ability were not the same thing;  many participants voiced the belief that giftedness was based on neurology. Also, to simply assert that giftedness is not fixed at birth or any other developmental stage, does not imply that all children are gifted. Environment was seen as an important aspect of nurturing a gifted child across their lifespan beginning in early childhood.

Learning styles were also discussed and comments may be found in the transcript. Educators who felt pressured to try to accommodate many different learning styles, but found it nearly impossible in a diverse ability classroom. What was found effective in supporting learning was presenting information in multiple sensory modes. Also, Corin Goodwin related a concern, “Often, learning styles are confused with mild learning disabilities. For example, I’m not an auditory learner because I’m hearing impaired. [Then] learning disabilities are overlooked.”

Neuroscience has refined our approach to ADHD in individuals with high IQs. ADHD in gifted children should not be written off as boredom. When executive function issues exist, we must deal with them. Neuroscientists reject an ADHD diagnosis based solely on observable behaviors and believe there is a need for further research to track brain functions. Misdiagnosis of ADHD in highly gifted children can be mitigated when the clinical focus is on impairment rather than overexcitability.

Finally, the issue of what educators and policymakers can learn from neuroscience about giftedness was discussed. There is a glaring disconnect between the two fields due in large part to lack of access to scientific research and misinterpretation of the research when it is available. Widespread dissemination of neuromyths at the undergraduate level in education programs exacerbates the problem.

What has been learned and recently understood is that:

  • More intelligent children exhibit earlier acceleration & prolonged time for rapid learning in early adolescence (Shaw 2006, Nature);
  • Motivation and inspiration can propel a person to achieve at higher levels than predicted by standardized tests;
  • Neuroscience of creativity – right/left brain distinction is not the full picture of how creativity is implemented in the brain (Kaufman); and
  • Creatively gifted children and polymaths need to be given freedom to learn their own way – they think differently (Andreasen).

To see more on what was said at this chat, a full transcript may be found on our Storify Page.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined (Kaufman)

Neuroscience and Education: Myths and Messages

Secrets of the Creative Brain (Andreasen)

Grounding Creative Giftedness in the Body

Finding Creative Potential on Intelligence Tests

Intelligence is Differentially Related to Neural Effort in Task-positive/Task-negative Brain Network

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity

Does Early Academic Prowess Predict Later Success?

Models of Working Memory Mechanisms of Active Maintenance & Executive Control

New Directions in Intelligence Research: Avoiding the Mistakes of the Past

Brain Research for Teachers & Other Curious Souls, 2013 update (Sheard)

Intelligent Testing (Kaufman 2009)

Brain-Based Learning, Myth versus Reality: Testing Learning Styles and Dual Coding

4 Common Dyslexia Myths Debunked Using Neuroscience

The Myths of Learning Styles

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ Are Not ‘Learning Styles’

Cybraryman’s The Brain and Brain Games Page

Learning Styles: Concepts and Evidence

Neuromyths in education: Prevalence and Predictors of Misconceptions Among Teachers

Deconstructing the Myth of Learning Styles

Think Your Child is a Visual or Auditory Learner? Think Again. From Duke TIP

Gifted Identification

Gifted Identification

Why is gifted identification important? Gifted identification not only provides a basis for school services but also helps a child understand his or her self. It can explain behaviors that are not universal to all children. As pointed out during the chat, it may help parents modify how they parent their gifted child and help teachers to teach them appropriately.

Our next question focused on who should be responsible for identification. Designated school personnel should be trained in gifted education and have a solid understanding of giftedness. Clinical Psychologist, Gail Post, of Gifted Challenges recommended that a psychologist or school psychologist preferably be involved in the process. Gifted Coordinator, Angie French, added, “School personnel need an understanding that not all gifted learners look the same.”

During the remainder of the chat, we also discussed what attributes should be considered when seeking to identify a gifted child; assessments to be used beyond IQ testing; how poor identification methods adversely affect low-income, minority and ELL students; and how to identify twice-exceptional learners. A full transcript may be found here.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Special thanks to Leslie Graves (President, World Council for Gifted and Talented Children) and Jerry Blumengarten (aka Cybraryman) for providing us with additional links during this chat.

Links:

Dumbing Down America (Amazon) Delisle

Ohio Dept of Ed – Gifted Screening and Identification

Identification of Gifted Children @HoagiesGifted

A Response to “All Children Are Gifted” by Michael C. Thompson (pdf) via @RFWPcom

Assessing Gifted Children by Julia Osburn via @HoagiesGifted

Use of the WISC-IV for Gifted Identification (pdf) via @NAGCGIFTED

Identifying & Serving Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Gifted Students (pdf) via @NAGCGIFTED

The Role of Assessments in the Identification of Gifted Students (pdf) via @NAGCGIFTED

The Identification of Students Who Are Gifted by Ruth Mary Coleman At LDOnline

High Achiever, Gifted Learner, Creative Thinker from Bertie Kingore

Identifying Gifted Students: A Practical Guide by Susan Johnsen (Amazon)

The Ongoing Dilemma of Effective Identification Practices in Gifted Education (pdf)

Teacher Bias in Identifying Gifted & Talented Students

Identifying Gifted Children Victoria (AUS) Dept of Ed

Identifying Gifted & Talented Students from London Gifted & Talented

Who is Currently Identified as Gifted in the U.S.? by Scott Barry Kaufman in Psychology Today

5 Issues with Gifted Education That I Have

Best Practices for Identifying Gifted Students (pdf)

Common Questions about Gifted Identification and Services (OR)

Critical Issues in the Identification of Gifted Students with Co-Existing Disabilities

Ethical Considerations for Gifted Assessment & Identification of Diverse Students (pdf)

Identification of Gifted Students Using The Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Tests (pdf)

Legal Issues in Identifying & Serving Twice-Exceptional Gifted Learners (pdf)

Additional Links (from chat participants):

Identification of Gifted and Talented Students Poudre School District

Gifted and Talented Program JeffCo Public Schools

Gifted Children Online Assessment Tool Now Available

Things My Child Likes to Do (pdf)

Use of Brief Intelligence Tests in the Identification of Giftedness (pdf) via Scott Barry Kaufman

Children Who Are Gifted, Talented, and Creative

Identification of Culturally Diverse Gifted Students (Livebinder)

Cybraryman’s 360 Degree Feedback Page

Cybraryman’s Gifted Identification Page

How to Identify the Gifted Student

Let Me Tell You About …Why Gifted Identification Matters by Jen Merrill

 

Graphic courtesy of Pixabay.

Asynchronous Transitioning to Adulthood

This chat marked our return to two weekly chats on Twitter at Noon and 7PM EDT. The discussion centered around the topic of how to help gifted teens transition to adulthood especially when they are dealing with asynchronous development. Participants shared their personal stories of what it was like to make this transition when they were that age. The transcript for this chat may be found on this blog.

Several suggestions were made to help ease the transition in high school by using flexible ability grouping to allow students to interact with intellectual peers. Dual-enrollment when available is a good way for teens to experience the rigor of college courses before attending full time. Students who decide to go to a university at a younger age can find it easier to attend a school close to home to avoid residential issues. Mentoring by older students with similar experiences is another good option. Dating/sexuality issues need to be discussed in an open and frank manner.

Links:

Gifted Ex-Child

Intelligence Does Not Equal Maturity from @TxGifted

“‘Play Partner’ or ‘Sure Shelter’: What Gifted Children Look for in Friendship” from @SENG_Gifted

Exceptionally Gifted Children: Different Minds

Genetic Studies of Genius (Terman)

Creative But Insecure

Why Capable People Suffer from the Impostor Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It (book)

 An Introduction to Combined Classes

EQ Versus IQ

Transition from Gifted Child to Adult Producer

Psychological Factors in the Development of Adulthood Giftedness from Childhood Talent

The Transition from Childhood Giftedness to Adult Creative Productiveness: Psychological Characteristics and Social Supports

The Adolescent Gifted Child

When Gifted Children Grow Up

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