Blog Archives

Humor and Gifted Kids

gtchat 07192018 Humor

This week at Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT we explored the relationship between humor and gifted kids. Our guest was Jo Freitag, #gtchat Advisor and founder/coordinator of Gifted Resources in Victoria, Australia. She also blogs at the Gifted Resources Blog and  Sprite’s Site. Jo wrote a great post at Sprite’s Site about this week’s chat, The Punch Line!

Gifted children with advanced abilities well beyond their years can manipulate and play with words in demonstrating verbal ability. They enjoy puns and word games which lead to seeing everyday situations in a comedic light.

Recognition and appreciation of adult humor is often part of an extensive native knowledge base possessed by intellectually gifted children. They may enjoy absurd types of humor such as Monty Python. Higher levels of intelligence permit the gifted child to be more quick witted and display a sense of humor that belies their ability to interpret everyday experiences in a different light than age-peers or even older children.

What are some of the downsides of verbal ability for gifted children? Language abilities tend to shine a light on gifted children making them a target of age-peers who don’t understand them. This can lead to teasing and verbal bullying. When bored in the classroom, gifted children may be prone to express thoughts and feelings conceived as being a ‘class clown’; considered an annoyance by teachers and even other high achievers in the classroom.

Teachers and professionals can use ‘sense of humor’ as an indicator of giftedness.  Recognizing a mature sense of humor is an easy way to begin the identification process. Expressions of humor deemed beyond that of age-peers may reveal a gifted child in hiding. Teachers and professionals can provide opportunities for gifted students to express humor in settings such as school talent shows.

What can teachers do to develop humor potential in gifted children? They may use satire in Greek drama, political cartooning, or investigate bathos (anticlimax; especially in literature) and pathos (pity, sadness; in rhetoric, film, or literature) to develop humor potential in gifted children. Teachers can encourage using humor appropriately and at appropriate times; using humor for positive purposes; and give students time to explore different types of humor. They should model appropriate forms of humor that show students the need to be considerate of others’ feelings; emphasizing the importance of developing positive relationships with age-peers.

Humor can also help gifted children deal with stress. At work and school, it can increase creative output and thus reduce negativity associated with stress. Humor is a natural way to reduce stress; to recognize social injustice and work to seek a way forward involving fairness and equality in society. Humor and laughter can enhance enjoyable leisure activities. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

It’s a Funny Thing: A Gifted Child’s Sense of Humor

Characteristics of Gifted Children: A Closer Look

Verbal Humor in Gifted Students and Students in the General Population: A Comparison of Spontaneous Mirth and Comprehension (Abstract Only)

Affective Trait 5: Advanced Sense of Humour (pdf)

The Double-Edged Sword of Giftedness, Part 2: Affective Traits

Tips for Parents: Teaching the Use of Humor to Cope with Stress

An Investigation of the Role of Humor in the Lives of Highly Creative Young Adults (pdf)

The Power of Humor in Ideation and Creativity

Haha and aha! : Creativity, Idea Generation, Improvisational Humor, and Product Design (pdf)

The Power of Laughter: Seven Secrets to Living and Laughing in a Stressful World (Amazon)

The Psychology of Humor: An Integrative Approach (Amazon)

Using Improvisation to Enhance the Effectiveness of Brainstorming (pdf)

How to Spot a Gifted Child

Raisin’ Brains: Surviving My Smart Family (Amazon)

Neuroscience of Giftedness: Greater Connectivity Across Brain Regions

Class Clown or Gifted Student? It’s A Matter of Perspective

Comedians’ Smarts, Humor, and Creativity

How Laughing Leads to Learning

The Benefits of Humor in the Classroom

Using Humor in the Classroom

Edublogs Webinar Overview – Using ToonDoo

Health Benefits of Laughter (pdf)

Cybraryman’s Words Page

Cybraryman’s Humor in the Classroom Page

Cybraryman’s Educational Puns Page

Photos courtesy of Jo Freitag and Natasha Bertrand.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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“Smart Girls” with author, Dr. @RobynMcKay

gtchat 10302015 Smart Girls

 

This week we were joined by Dr. Robyn McKay, co-author of Smart Girls and founder of the website ‘She{ology}’. The discussion centered around smart girls – how they are viewed by society, barriers they face and strategies to use to become successful.

It was quickly pointed out that smart girls often don’t fit society’s image of ‘smart’; nor do they always meet a particular school’s image of ‘smart’. Robyn explained, “Smart girls are often too well-adjusted for their own good. Like chameleons, they adapt and fit in instead of stand out. They begin to hide ability by grade 5. They stop raising their hands in class and whisper the answer to their bff instead.  The trend of hiding ability continues thru high school, college, and their professional life [in adulthood].”

Mental health issues can arise for smart girls. Robyn told us, ” They are good at masking disabilities like anxiety, depression, and ADHD (inattentive type). They mask because they CAN.  Smart girls use their intellectual resources to fit in and manage their disabilities. Just think how creative twice-exceptional smart girls could be if they didn’t have to work so hard to mask anxiety depression or ADHD.”

Next we considered what it meant to be smart and a girl in today’s world. Robyn said, “Intellectually able women often discount their intellect and credit hard work and luck to their success. They often don’t believe that they are smart. Although smart woman are able to juggle many responsibilities and have it all, this can also lead to burn out and early exit from careers.” Add to this that attempts to define ‘smart’ for women have been colored by ideas of gender, race and culture.

“We need to educate all students about gender disparities, inequalities in life and empower them to not just overcome but challenge them.” ~ Tyler Murphy, Kentucky educator

In the book Smart Girls, Dr. McKay and co-author Dr. Barbara Kerr made it a point to leave out definitions of giftedness that include sensitivities, intensities, or overexcitabilities as they focused on talent development. We ask Robyn to clarify this approach. Her response was, “Research has not linked overexcitabilities, intensities or sensitivities to academic achievement, high performance at work, or life satisfaction – the predictions we were interested in. Focus on OE sensitivity or intensity can cause us to pathologize giftedness; to make it seem as if strong, even maladaptive, reactions are a sign of giftedness rather than a sign of a very frustrated, bored or troubled child.”

Then we turned our attention to the barriers smart girls face in having their intelligence recognized. Previous flawed research assumed women could not achieve eminence. Barriers to recognition of intelligence can include environment, race, appearance and privilege. Robyn noted, “Gifted underachievers – who don’t “look gifted” because they don’t get As in every class are often overlooked. Creative girls with uneven performance in school are over looked – get As in the classes they love and and Cs and Ds in the classes that bore them and fail the classes they hate.” Furthermore, Robyn told us, “Smart girls need to know: what’s her IQ? What’s her personality profile? These help her understand why she is the way she is. Armed with data, her self-esteem rises.”

Finally, what are some strategies smart girls can use to succeed in the 21st century? Don’t allow society’s views dissuade your ambition – work toward your passions. For young gifted girls, encourage imaginative play, a healthy diet and adequate sleep. Encourage choices that help girls fulfill their dreams; realize their ‘future self’.

Robyn offered this advice to smart girls, “Don’t date “potential” – don’t date people who aren’t chasing their own goals and dreams. Make career decisions based on your creative flow and strengths. Say “yes” to new experiences. Get support for your mental health. Anxiety, depression, eating disorders keep you from living your dreams. Get As in the classes you love and Bs in everything else. You don’t have to be perfect.”

Transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays Noon NZDT/10 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Smart Girls in the 21st Century: Understanding Talented Girls & Women (Amazon)

Gifted Parenting Support: Smart Girls in the 21st Century

Smart Girls Takes Silver in the 2015 Benjamin Franklin Awards

Celebrating Smart Girls in the 21st Century with Dr. Barbara Kerr at The Psychology Podcast

Reviews for Smart Girls in the 21st Century

Dr. Robyn McKay’s Website ‘she{ology}’

About Dr. Robyn McKay

When Intensity Goes to School: Overexcitabilities, Creativity and the Gifted Child (Google Books Preview)

Educated in Romance: Women, Achievement and College Culture (Amazon)

Gifted Girls – Many Gifted Girls, Few Eminent Women: Why? (pdf)

Gifted Women: Identity & Expression

Harnessing Gifted Girls’ Emotional Strengths

What About Gifted Girls

Gender and Genius

Gender Identity and the Overexcitability Profiles of Gifted College Students (pdf)

The Effect of Gender-Role Stereotyping on the Career Aspirations and Expectations of Pre-Adolescent Children of High Intellectual Ability (pdf 1967)

The Intersection of Gender Equity and Gifted Elementary Education: Does Numerical Parity Tell the Whole Story (pdf)

Why Women Still Can’t Have It All

A Mighty Girl (website)

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

The Relationship between Creativity and Intelligence

gtchat 10232015 Creativity Intelligence

This week’s topic, The Relationship between Creativity and Intelligence was a bit ‘deeper’ than usual. It became quickly apparent that there were many divergent opinions on the subject. It proved to be an interesting conversation. We welcomed many new people to the chat as well!

In order to consider this relationship, we first defined what intelligence and creativity meant to our participants. According to Gautam, intelligence is a domain-general ability to solve complex adaptive problems. In its pure form, intelligence is complex and multidimensional. Defining intelligence has gotten a lot of press in recent years; many new ideas!

Creativity is the ability to come up with original, surprising and useful ideas. (Gautam) Tamara Fisher, education specialist, described it as, “the capacity to generate and innovate in new ways, whether by sudden instinct or through long, hard work.” Creativity emerged as an adaptive cognitive mechanism; improvisational reasoning could lead to novel solutions. (Jung) Christensen defined creativity as the “ability to go beyond intelligence an capitalize on seemingly random connections of concepts.”

Currently, there is no scientific consensus on how these constructs [creativity and intelligence] are related. Some believe intelligence may increase creative potential up to a certain degree. (Jauk, Benedek, Dunst, Neubauer 2013) Some say they are opposite ends of a spectrum; other the same thing.

What are some things that characterize highly creative people? Highly creative people are passionate, sensitive, imaginative, intuitive, and often solitary. They are open to experience, mindful, think differently, daydreamers, turn adversity into advantage. 

We then discussed why it is important to understand the creative process as it affects gifted kids & adults. The more we know about neuroscience and creativity, the better we can meet the needs of gifted children. Using outdated information can diminish best practices for empowering gifted kids to fulfill their potential. Understanding how the brain works and networks will benefit all gifted and twice-exceptional children. A transcript may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays Noon NZDT/10 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

The Relationship between Creativity and Intelligence

The Relationship between Intelligence & Creativity: New Support for the Threshold Hypothesis

Intelligence and Creativity of Polish Middle-school Students: Looking for the Threshold Hypothesis (pdf)

Genius, Creativity and Breakthrough Innovations

Interview with Dean Keith Simonton on Intelligence and Creativity

The Study of Effects of Socio Demographic Factors of Senior Secondary School Students on Creativity and Intelligence

Creativity & Intelligence Leading to Psychosis and Autism (Sandeep Gautam)

Creativity and Intelligence: a Tripartite Structure? (Sandeep Gautam)

The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence (Amazon)

From Madness to Genius: The Openness/Intellect Trait Domain as a Paradoxical Simplex (abstract)

Intelligence, Creativity and Mania

Evolution, Creativity, Intelligence, and Madness: “Here Be Dragons”

Must One Risk Madness to Achieve Genius?

Wired to Create Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind (December 2015)

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity

Neuroscience of Creativity (Amazon)

Another Look at Creativity and Intelligence: Exploring Higher-Order Models and Probable Confounds

Intelligence and Creativity

 

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad. Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain 

An Interview with Scott Barry Kaufman

Kaufman Scott Barry

Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman

Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman will deliver the Keynote, From Evaluation to Inspiration, at the Closing General Session of this year’s Annual Conference of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented on December 5th in Fort Worth, Texas. Dr. Kaufman is the Scientific Director of The Imagination Institute and a researcher at the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the co-founder of the popular website The Creativity Post and writes the blog Beautiful Minds for Scientific American Minds. He has a doctorate in cognitive psychology from Yale University, a master’s degree in experimental psychology from Cambridge University where he was a Gates Cambridge Scholar and B.S. degree from Carnegie Mellon University.

Dr. Kaufman is an outspoken advocate for a new approach to understanding intelligence and the role of imagination. Recently, he accepted our invitation to be interviewed. His insights based on extensive research and inspired by personal experience are changing the conversation surrounding giftedness, creativity and the direction of education.

SBK at NAGC

Dr. Kaufman speaking at the 2014 NAGC Convention

M: What is the difference between creative giftedness and intellectual giftedness?

SBK: To me, intellectual giftedness is a reflection of advanced development of a range of characteristics that facilitate ascertaining what is, including intellectual curiosity, intellectual interests, academic intrinsic motivation, quick and efficient learning of new material, abstract reasoning, visuospatial reasoning, and vocabulary. In contrast, creative giftedness reflects the advanced development of a set of characteristics that facilitate ascertaining what could be, including daydreaming, imagination, prospection, perspective taking, divergent thinking, and nonconformity. Obviously, there is overlap, but not complete overlap.

M:  How does a child’s environment affect their ability to learn?

SBK: The environment is crucial in bringing out optimal learning outcomes in all children. There’s a lot of emerging research showing the importance of student engagement for learning. Environmental factors can influence engagement in the way it increases (or decreases) a sense of belonging, support, high expectations, and inspiration.

M: Could you explain the difference between intelligence testing and intelligent testing?

SBK: The notion of intelligence testing is that we can determine a person’s level of intelligence through a single, decontextualized testing session. I much prefer to think of each testing session as an opportunity for intelligent testing on the part of the examiner to determine the child’s unique learning needs, style of responding, engagement, and creativity. The great intelligence researcher Alan Kaufman has been arguing for intelligent testing since the year I was born!

“Every person on this earth is full of great possibilities that can be realized through imagination, effort, and perseverance.”

M: The concept of inspiration; what role does it play in inspiring student engagement and can it increase cognitive efficiency?

SBK: Inspiration transforms people’s views of their own capabilities, and their place in the world. People who are inspired are typically inspired to realize some new grand vision they have for themselves or others, and inspiration motivates people to approach that vision. In a lot of ways, it’s an organic, longer lasting way of motivating students to want to do well, because inspiration is about as intrinsically motivating at you can get.

M: What advice would you give to educators to help them recognize potential in their students?

SBK: I’d suggest that educators stop thinking of potential as something that is set in stone at any moment in time, but as a moving target constantly changing and highly dependent on engagement. Personally, I much prefer the word “possibility” than “potential”. Every person on this earth is full of great possibilities that can be realized through imagination, effort, and perseverance.

Thank you, Dr. Kaufman, for bringing perspective to these important issues. We look forward to hearing your Keynote at TAGT 2014. Look for our tweets at hashtag #tagt14 on Twitter December 3rd through the 5th.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Books by Scott Barry Kaufman:

Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined (Amazon)

The Complexity of Greatness: Beyond Talent or Practice (Amazon)

The Psychology of Creative Writing with James C. Kaufman (Amazon)

The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence with Robert J. Sternberg, editors (Amazon)

The Philosophy of Creativity: New Essays with Elliott Samuel Paul, editors (Amazon)

Podcasts:

The Psychology Podcast (website)

Daydreaming and Mental Contrasting for Goal-Fulfillment with Gabriele Oettingen

The Science of Growing Smarter with Annie Murphy Paul

Talking Mastery and Social Intelligence with Author Robert Greene

Interviews:

The Problem with Standardized Tests

Why the Current Definition of Intelligence Isn’t Smart

A Defense of Daydreaming (Audio 52:05)

The Innovative and Creative Power of ADHD (Audio 9:35)

Articles:

From Evaluation to Inspiration

Who Is Currently Identified as Gifted in the United States

Creativity and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Across the Arts and Sciences

The Creative Gifts of ADHD

Confessions of a Late Bloomer

American Education and the IQ Trap

 

Photo of Scott Barry Kaufman from scottbarrykaufman.com

Photo of Dr. Scott Kaufman at NAGC courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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