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The Role of Executive Function in Gifted Children

 

Executive function is in charge of making sure things get done from the planning stages of the job to the final deadline. (A. Morin) “EF involves self-regulating attention, mood, and behavior, in order to get complex tasks done well. We can think of EF as being like the little CEO in the frontal lobe.” (Davidson Gifted)

A child struggling with EF deficits may have difficulty starting or completing tasks, switching tasks, or following directions. Children struggling with EF deficits may be unorganized (including workspaces and backpacks), display an inability to manage their time or keep track of assignments, or become easily frustrated by routine changes.

It’s not “uncommon for high-ability learners to struggle with executive functions.” Asynchronous development, twice-exceptionality, or even lack of early challenge can be related to EF deficits. “Some gifted kids may have very fast processing speed, leading their brains to rapidly move from one topic to another, and leaving basic skills in their dust.” Gifted children whose processing speed shows a great lag behind their other cognitive processes may struggle to show task initiation skills that look like lack of motivation. (Kaleel and Kircher-Morris)

What are some of the consequences when EF deficits exist in a gifted child? These are smart kids who struggle with behavior regulation and exercising cognitive flexibility. Although identified as GT, they may have trouble beginning tasks, maintaining attention, completing assignments, and unable to assess the feedback on their own behavior. Frustration levels can go through the roof. As the GT child progresses through school, academic requirements increase at the same time as social interactions take on greater significance. EF difficulties may not resolve themselves until they reach their mid-twenties.

Strategies for developing EF skills can be employed in the classroom. Teachers can choose specific skills such as organization and work with the student to understand the nature of the executive function deficit. Students who display EF deficits need a patient teacher willing to work with them over time and provide positive encouragement to build skills incrementally. Oftentimes, small, simple steps have the most success.

Parents can make a difference when it comes to EF skills deficits in their children. Parents can engage in sincere and purposeful praise, encourage effort, and being sensitive to needs expressed by their child. Parents need to provide rules that are applied consistently, opportunities for enrichment, and encourage independence when helping their children develop EF skills over time. (Willingham)

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Procrastination and Gifted Students

The Highly Distracted Gifted Child

Executive Functioning in Gifted Students (pdf) https://bit.ly/2YUzfRh

Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary “Executive Skills” Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential (Amazon)

The Smart but Scattered Guide to Success: How to Use Your Brain’s Executive Skills to Keep Up, Stay Calm, and Get Organized at Work and at Home (Amazon)

Tips for Parents: Executive Functioning at Home and School

Gifted Learners and Executive Functioning

How to Engage Strong Executive Skills in Gifted Learners

Executive Function Skills and Gifted Students

Improving Executive Function Skills in Gifted Kids (YouTube 1:05:28)

The Best Books for Teaching About Executive Functions Skills

Closing the Door and Other Executive Difficulties

Executive Skills and How They Translate to Professional Strengths

Executive Function Disorder: What It Is & How to Overcome It

Why is the Milk in the Back of the Supermarket? thinkLaw’s New Asset-Based Critical Thinking Class for Parents

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

The Highly Distracted Gifted Child

gtchat 09202018 Distracted

Understanding the nature of giftedness when complicated by distractibility is a complex issue and the discussions between participants at this week’s #gtchat were no exception. We were fortunate to have several psychologists well-versed in working with gifted individuals as well as education professionals to sort it out.

How do you know if distractibility is  just a characteristic of giftedness or ADD/ADHD? You may not know! ADD/ADHD must be diagnosed by a professional. If you are concerned about a child’s behavior, seek professional help. Both giftedness and ADD/ADHD share characteristics, but it’s important to avoid misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis. Gifted students may have ADD/ADHD but be able to compensate for it.

According to Dr. Gail Post, “ADHD causes more global problem with distraction and concentration, not just related to boredom, intensities, overexcitabilities. ADHD kids have little control over their distraction/poor concentration – not situation specific. They really suffer from it.” Dr. Scott Roseman explained, “Formal assessment of giftedness and ADHD differ in significant ways.  While assessment of giftedness focuses mainly on determination of higher level reasoning abilities, assessment of ADHD examines issues related to distractibility, impulsivity, and processing skills. While the gifted child may exhibit some of these qualities, as a function of their giftedness, it’s often when those qualities get in the way of learning & growth that further assessment should be considered to assess a dual diagnosis of Giftedness and ADHD.”

In response to a child’s distractibility, the response of  ‘over’ organizing by a concerned adult may prove to make matters worse. Over organization … such as separate folders for each subject … may overwhelm the distracted child causing even more issues or anxiety. Parents (and teachers) should try to find the ‘middle ground’ when attempting to organize a distracted child. Folders can be used but for more generalized subjects; such as, a completed homework folder, to do folder, and parent/teacher communications.

“The main disadvantage of “over” organization I see is when it is put in place by the parent and not the child. The child or adolescent has no “ownership” in the process and may grow too reliant on parental intervention and not develop effective organizational tools on their own.” ~ Scott Roseman, Ph.D.

Executive Functioning can play as intricate role in the life of a distracted yet gifted child. The lack of recognition by responsible adults that a GT child can have executive function deficits often exacerbates the situation. These are smart kids who struggle with behavior regulation and exercising cognitive flexibility. Although identified as GT, they may have trouble beginning tasks, maintaining attention, completing assignments, and unable to assess the feedback on their own behavior. Frustration levels can go through the roof. As the child progresses through school, academic requirements increase at the same time as social interactions take on greater significance. EF difficulties may not resolve themselves until the child reaches their mid-twenties.

What strategies can a teacher use to get a gifted student back on track? Teachers should consider authentic assessments to chart progress/regression through an ongoing process which takes into account the student’s abilities as well as challenges. Developing positive relationships is a good 1st step. They must ensure that the student is being sufficiently stimulated intellectually either within the classroom with differentiated instruction or through accelerative measures outlined in resources such as A Nation Empowered.

“I think you have to do lots of trial and error with strategies…visual prompts to get back on task or having a reward after a significant start to an assignment or discussing what the feedback means.” ~ Heather Vaughn, EdS, 

Once it is determined that the student is off track, any plan to bring them back on course must involve student input. Dr. Roseman suggested, “I suggest that the teacher start by asking the gifted student, in grade 3 and above to come up with their own plan to stay on task and then work together with them, examining the parts of the plan that work and the parts that don’t seem to work for them and revise. I believe that it helps the child to gain a better understanding of their  own dynamics and figure out strategies that work for them and those that don’t. The teacher can certainly suggest some strategies, but it is critical for the student to have input.”

“With my kids, what has worked is a combination of doing it for them if was really necessary until they could do it; letting them fail a little when stakes are low, and coaching them about the things not being organized has negative impact on.” ~ Kate Arms

Parents can help their highly distracted child get organized at home, too. They can make sure that the home environment limits distractions when their child is doing school work. This includes having a quiet workspace free from access to video games or television. If possible, provide study/work space solely for each child; not in a highly active part of the home such as the dining room table or shared spaces with siblings.  Parents need to model behavior which provides examples of how to stay organized in daily life.

“Pick your battles… But get them involved in devising a plan and incentives, prioritize, small goals to start with, make it fun!” ~ Gail Post, Ph.D.

Organization is a must-need skill and one that parents focus on much to the dismay of their distracted child. Involve the child in the organizing process. Be flexible; not all organizing tools or tips work for every child. Parents and teachers working together to implement strategies that take place at home and at school can be highly beneficial to the student in an effort to reduce distractions and get the student back on track. For more tips about organizing the highly distracted gifted child, check out the transcript of this week’s chat at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

The Highly Distracted Gifted Child: You Can Help

Gifted Students & Disorganization (Reg. required)

This Child is a Classic ‘Absent-Minded Professor’

How to Raise a Gifted Child without Losing Your Ever-Loving Mind

Organization Skills

Executive Functioning in Gifted Students (pdf)

Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary “Executive Skills” Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential (bn ebook)

4 Smartphone Solutions to Keep Your Teen Organized

7 Ways to Teach Your Grade-Schooler Organization Skills

Exercise Is Surprisingly Effective At Boosting Executive Function

On Rainbows and Mantis Shrimp: A Layperson’s Perspective on ADHD & the Misdiagnosis of Gifted Brains

How to Help the Impulsive Disorganized Child

The Impulsive, Disorganized Child: Solutions for Parenting Kids with Executive Functioning Difficulties

Organizing the Gifted Learner

Organizing Einstein: Enhancing the Abilities of the Gifted Learner Part 1

Becoming a Self-Regulated Learner: An Overview (pdf)

Cybraryman’s Study Skills/Organization Page

Cybraryman’s ADHD/ADD Page

Sprite’s Site: Delta Dog

Sprite’s Site: Sprite on the Subject of Homework

Interruptions at Work Are Killing Your Productivity

ADDitude Magazine

Tips for Parents: Executive Functioning at Home and School

Are you ADD — or just gifted?

Image courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Creative Commons

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Twice-Exceptional Smart Kids with Learning Differences

TAGT 2013 gtchat 4

LIVE from Houston, Texas! Global #gtchat was excited to be at this year’s TAGT Annual Conference where we debuted the new brochure from Gifted Homeschoolers Forum on Twice-Exceptional Learners. It was a perfect match with sentiments shared in the Conference Keynote by Dr. Temple Grandin. A full transcript may be found here.

It’s always an exhilarating experience to participate in a Twitter chat with a live audience and this was no exception. Many thanks goes out to those who came to help the folks who were new to chat. Check out the pictures below!

TAGT 2013 gtchat

Jeffrey Farley, Mary Lovell and Tracy Fisher

TAGT 2013 gtchat 2

Carolyn Coil

TAGT 2013 gtchat 5A

Krissy Venosdale, Angie French, Lisa Conrad and Stacia Taylor

Special thanks to Corin Goodwin and her staff from Gifted Homeschoolers Forum for going the extra mile to make this a very special and informative chat. Global #gtchat appreciates the collaborative relationship that has developed between our two organizations. Support of gifted children and their unique needs is definitely a community effort.

TAGT 2013 gtchat 6

Promotional Materials Courtesy of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum

Links:

Twice Exceptional Smart Kids with Learning Differences” brochure from @GiftedHF (pdf)

Gifted Homeschoolers Forum (website) from @GiftedHF

GHF Press from @GiftedHF

Beating the Odds: An Interview with Temple Grandin” (pdf) TEMPO Magazine

Brief Summary ~ Dr. Temple Grandin Keynote TAGT 2013

The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed” (book – bn) Dr. Temple Grandin

Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented (website)

TAGT Annual Conference 2014 in Fort Worth

Legacy Book Award Winners 2013 from the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented

Gifted & Twice Exceptional Kids: An Interview with Corin Goodwin & Mika Gustavson’ 

Asynchronous Scholars’ Fund (website)

ASD & Giftedness: Twice Exceptionality on the Autistic Spectrum

Life Among the ‘Yakkity Yaks‘” An Interview with Temple Grandin

Gifted Children with Learning Challenges (Twice Exceptional)

Raising My Twice-Exceptional Children… Not What I Signed Up For!

Developing Social Thinking in the Twice-exceptional (2e) Learner through Improvisational Play

Giftedness Should Not Be Confused with Mental Disorder

Stuck, Stubborn and Always Right? Changing Patterns of Rigid Thinking

The Paradox of Giftedness:  When Potential Doesn’t Necessarily Predict Performance

Executive Functioning at Home and School” by @ayermish via @DavidsonGifted

What happens when students don’t have good executive functioning skills?

#gtchat Goes to TAGT ’12

@gtchatmod on Twitter (aka Lisa Conrad) will be attending the TAGT’s Annual Conference in Dallas, November 28 – 30, 2012 and TAGT’s Parent Conference on November 30th.

Sheraton Dallas

Lisa will be presenting at both conferences. You can hear her on Thursday @4PM to 5PM, “Why You Should #gtchat on Twitter” (Room: Pearl 4); on Friday @ 7:45AM to 8:45 AM, “Twitter Chat 101” (Room: Pearl 4); and again on Friday @1:40PM to 2:30PM, “Collaboration, Not Confrontation: Parents and Teachers Working Together” (Parents’ Conference, Room: Austin 3).

On Friday, November 30th, #gtchat will be live from the Social Connections Area in the Exhibit Hall. It will begin @10:30AM CT for conference attendees (although everyone is invited online) and from 11AM to Noon CT [Find your time here. ] on Twitter. Our topic will be, “Building Bridges with #gtchat”. Following chat, there will be a 40 minute Tweet-Up for those at the conference.

Social Connections Area (2011)

Chat participants on Twitter are invited to tweet about how they have connected with others via #gtchat and how it has affected their lives. Many friendships have been made and many hours of professional development have been delivered since its beginning in January 2010.

#gtchat strives to provide a place where the conversation can take place and then take off. We plan to continue to showcase leaders in gifted education as well as tackle the tough issues such as parent-teacher relations, impostor syndrome, executive functioning and the mythology surrounding giftedness (January 2013).

In preparation for this chat, I have provided some of the questions that will be presented during the chat on November 30th. It is hoped that online Tweeps will share with conference attendees the benefits of weekly chats.

Questions:

1)      How has #gtchat connected you to the gifted community?

2)      How do you use Twitter in your daily life?

3)      How has #gtchat affected how you parent/teach?

4)      Are you involved in other Twitter chats?

Hope to see you all in person or online!

Lisa (@gtchatmod)

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