Blog Archives

Holiday Stress and Gifted Families with guest Jade Rivera

Jade Rivera

Jade Rivera

Holiday stress is an issue that affects many families with gifted members. This week, Jade Rivera joined us to search for ways to alleviate this stress and enjoy the holiday season. Jade is an educator and consultant who specializes in gifted education for highly sensitive, asynchronous learners. She is hosting a Community Call on November 10th “Holiday Stress & The Gifted Family” for Gifted Homeschoolers Forum.

GHF Holiday Call

Many factors come into play when talking about why gifted children find the holidays difficult to enjoy. The disruption in their daily routine, high expectations of others, perfectionism, empathy for the less fortunate all contribute in some way to the anxiety they feel.

It is possible to prevent many of the negative reactions experienced during the holidays with planning in advance by talking to children and family members about expectations and what to do when it just gets to be ‘too much’. Developing a plan beforehand is key to experiencing a happy holiday season with your family. A full transcript of the chat may be found here.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

This Halloween, Banish The Boo & Conquer The (Worry) Monster! by Dr. Dan Peters

A Recipe for a Peaceful Holiday Season from SENG Gifted

Holiday Survival Guide for Parents of Gifted Children

Cycling Through the Holiday: The IPSE Four-Stip Process for Managing Hard Stuff

Dear Parents: Here’s How to Survive & Thrive at the Holidays from Pamela Price at Red, White and Grew

Happy Crappy Holidays! by Celi Trepanier of Crushing Tall Poppies

oliday Tips & Tricks for High Maintenance Introverts   by Amy Harrington

Holidays, 2e, and the Man in the Red Suit

Keeping my Sanity Through the Holidays with a 2E Child by Care Martin

Naked Holidays: Stripping for Low Stress by Wenda Sheard

Pinterest and the Myth of Holiday Perfection by Jen Merrill at Laughing at Chaos

Surviving the Christmas Season by Jo Freitag at Sprite’s Site

Handling the Holidays with Your Gifted Child: Excitement, Anxiety and Acting-Out Behavior

Managing Your Gifted Kid’s Intensity During the Holidays

Holidays & Your Gifted Child

Reducing Holiday Stress

Parenting Gifted Children through the Holidays

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Discipline and the Gifted Child

Scolded

Discipline can be a delicate subject when it involves gifted children. This week at #gtchat we tackled this topic as it related to both parents and teachers. With regard to the difficulty faced by adults when considering discipline, it was agreed that it was more about perspective than how hard it was to accomplish. It should be considered behavior development rather than punishment. Trying to force or coerce a gifted child to do what you want, doesn’t work. Building a relationship built on respect does.

Emotional intensities paired with intellect play a large role when deciding about discipline. A gifted child seeks to deeply understand the world around them and this can lead to perceived misbehavior by others. Oftentimes, simply recognizing when a child shows restraint in displaying appropriate behavior in social settings can add perspective.

Asynchronous development also plays a role. The reasoning and verbal skills of very young gifted can lead to the need to incorporate patience with discipline. Being ‘many ages at once’ can influence behavior in gifted children that may be imperceptible to others.

Preventing discipline problems in the classroom was discussed as well. Problems fade in the classroom when students are placed with intellectual peers and challenged appropriately. Students placed with a teacher who enjoys teaching gifted & learning with them rarely develop discipline problems. (Delisle) When teachers understand how gifted students learn, they can develop a mutually beneficial relationship and respect grows. A full transcript may be found here.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

How (Not) to Argue with Gifted Children

Positive Discipline for Gifted Children

Positive Discipline: Flip Your Lid (YouTube)

Positive Discipline Guidelines (pdf)

Considerations and Strategies for Parenting the Gifted Child (pdf)

Disciplining Gifted Children

Four Ways to Reduce Behavior Problems from Byrdseed Gifted

Disciplining the Gifted Child Should Be All about Training & Teaching, Not Judging & Punishing

Discipline, A Must for Gifted Kids

Discipline and Your Intense Child

Disciplining the Sensitive Child from Dr. Dan Peters

Growing Up Gifted by Barbara Clark

Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students by Christine Fonseca

 

Image courtesy of MorgueFile.

Special Guest: Dr. Dan Peters

Dan PetersDr. Dan Peters

Our special guest this week was Dr. Dan Peters, licensed psychologist, co-founder and Executive Director of the Summit Center, specializing in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families, with special emphasis on gifted, talented, and creative individuals and families. He is the author of “Make Your Worrier a Warrior A Guide to Conquering Your Child’s Fears” and the companion book for the child, “From Worrier to Warrior A Guide to Conquering Your Fears”.

Worrier to Warrior Books

Some of the topics covered included what behaviors parents/teachers should look for in a child if they suspect anxiety, what  you should do if your child does not want to be helped,  what characteristics of gifted/2e make them susceptible to anxiety and behavioral interventions parents/adults can use to combat anxiety. A full transcript can be found here.

Links:

Senginar: ‘How to Help Your Gifted/2e Child Conquer Fear’ 3/18 from @SENG_Gifted w/ @drdanpeters

Make Your Worrier a Warrior (book)

Dr. Dan Peter’s Bio  

Common Misdiagnosis in Gifted Kids” by Dr. Dan Peters

Monitoring Anxiety in Your Gifted Child” by Dr. Dan Peters

Does Your Child Know the Worry Monster?” by Dr. Dan Peters

From Worrier to Warrior’ with Dr. Dan Peters on Blog Talk Radio for TheCoffeeKlatch

10 Steps for Parents & Kids to Tame the Worry Monster” by Dr. Dan Peters

Worries & Sensory Processing Disorder” (book review)

Interview with Dr. Dan Peters on The Mark Daniels Show (Vimeo)

Dr. Dan Peters’ Website

Dr. Dan Peters Co-Founder of the Summit Center

Managing Anxiety in Gifted Children” by Dr. Dan Peters

Thankful for Two New Sensory Tools: The Worrier to Warrior Books

C ybraryman’s Yoga Page

Cybraryman’s Programming Page

Tres Columnae‘s Website

What is Catastrophizing?

Dr. Peters on Facebook

Dr. Peters at Psychology Today

Dr. Peters at Huffington Post 

2014 The Year Ahead

2014 got off to a rousing start with a look to the year ahead! It was exciting to see many old friends as well as many ‘first-timers’. In fact, there were so many tweets that we were unable to get to all of the prepared questions! A full transcript may be read here.

The chat was filled with some exciting news of upcoming guests ~ including Dr. Joy Davis (for a return appearance), Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman, Christine Fonseca (for a 3rd guest appearance on our chat) and Dr. Dan Peters. All are in the process of being scheduled and dates will be announced in the near future.

We also discussed the possibility of a bi-lingual chat with teachers in the U.S. and Mexico which will admittedly take some planning. If you are interested in participating, please email gtchatmod@gmail.com for details.

There was certainly interest in moving the time for #gtchat. It has always been a difficult time slot for parents and teachers as well. Potential times included Thursday evening at 8/7 C or Saturday/Sunday afternoon. Unlike other educational chats, our ‘global’ nature has always been a serious consideration. At the current time, it is extremely difficult for our friends in the UK/Europe to participate on a regular basis.

In response to “who would you like to see as a guest”, we were pleased to see that several of our already contacted guests were on many people’s wishlist. Other requests included ~ Dr. Patricia Gatto-Walden, Dr. Joyce Juntune, Dr. Jim Webb, Dr. Ed Amend, Stephanie Tolan, and Dr. George Betts. Please check out the transcript for a complete list.

“What would you like to chat about?” garnered enough responses to cover the entire year! Some of the topics mentioned included: math anxiety; gay and straight relationships for teens and gifted adults; how to start a parent advocacy group; twice-exceptional; gifted kids and puberty; adult perfectionism; and  Asperger’s and gifted. The moderator will work to include as many as possible.

In a welcomed turn of events, several other educational chats expressed interest in doing a joint chat with #gtchat. We hope to move on these requests in the very near future!

Gifted Education Myths

Over the course of the next two weeks, we will be discussing “Myths of Gifted Education” and utilizing the list provided by the NAGC (US) on their website. Prechat tweets and retweets are showing a good deal of interest in this topic! Please join us on Fridays at 7/6 C on Twitter for engaging discussions on all things gifted.

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