Blog Archives

Culturally Responsive and Relevant Curriculum

Culturally relevant curriculum respects individual student culture and attempts to increase awareness in relating that culture to course content. Teachers using culturally relevant teaching display competence at teaching in a multicultural classroom. This pedagogy is thought to improve academic achievement for all students. Historically, “culturally relevant pedagogy urges collective action grounded in cultural understanding. (Ladson-Billings 1992)”

Why is culturally responsive teaching important in gifted education? It is linked to a wide range of positive outcomes including improved attendance, academic persistence, and much more interest in school in general. In gifted education, it addresses ‘stereotype threat’ – a fear that one is conforming to a stereotype (their culture) – which in turn can lead to lower academic achievement. Motivation is another concern for GT students which can be mitigated in part by providing a curriculum that is perceived as culturally relevant, useful and of interest. Many of the principles of culturally relevant pedagogy directly affect GT students including identity development, equity and excellence, and managing student emotions.

What is the goal of a culturally responsive curriculum? A culturally responsive curriculum replaces deficit-oriented teaching – seeing language, culture or identity as a barrier to learning – with asset-based approaches. The goal for culturally sensitive teachers is to respond to the needs of diverse populations in their classroom with student-oriented instruction. A culturally responsive curriculum might involve choosing non-English translations of material used in the classroom or adaptive technology for twice-exceptional students.

There are many ways to incorporate culturally responsive teaching strategies; first, be invested in learning about your students and their culture through open and honest communication with them. To be truly culturally responsive, teachers need to be immersed in the culture of their students – visit where they live, learn their language (lingo), and remove negative stereotypes from the classroom culture. Teaching strategies considered culturally responsive could include bringing guest speakers into the classroom who are representative of the culture, use real-world problem solving techniques, and use technology effectively.

How can a culturally responsive and relevant curriculum improve classroom management? A culturally responsive classroom acts as a safe haven for students who learn in a far less judgmental atmosphere. This can have a profound effect on classroom management where students want to display appropriate behavior. A culturally responsive classroom is inherently a more interesting place to learn. It empowers students to own their learning and the desire to improve their behavior as opposed to a setting where they feel a disconnect to the curriculum.

Culturally responsive curriculum will remain relevant; especially as gifted education becomes more culturally responsive itself regarding the identification process. Students exposed to a culturally responsive curriculum will be better prepared to thrive in an increasing diverse world and global economy. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Introducing the Culturally Responsive Curriculum Scorecard: A Tool to Evaluate Curriculum

Striving for a Culturally Responsive Curriculum

Culturally Responsive Teaching A 50-State Survey of Teaching Standards (pdf)

Three Research-based Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies

Turn the Page: Looking Beyond the Textbook for Culturally-Responsive Curriculum

What have districts learned when embracing culturally responsive curricula?

5 Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies

Keeping Students at the Center with Culturally Relevant Performance Assessments

Critical Thinking Skills and Academic Achievement (pdf)

Engaging Curriculum

From Discipline to Culturally Responsive Engagement: 45 Classroom Management Strategies (book)

Teaching to Encourage Motivation (pdf)

Culturally Responsive Classroom Management & Motivation Handbook – Chapter 8: Qualities of Culturally Sensitive Teachers

The Center for Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning (website)

Being Culturally Responsive

Culturally Responsive Teaching – Excerpts from The Knowledge Loom: Educators Sharing and Learning Together (pdf)

Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies

The Two-by-Ten Classroom Management Method

Why a Culturally Responsive Curriculum Works

Culturally Responsive Teaching: Theory, Research, and Practice (Multicultural Education Series) 2nd Edition (book 2000)

Graphic courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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Meeting the Needs of GT Students at the Secondary Level

gtchat 07182017 Secondary

In many school districts, the end of elementary school also signals the end of gifted programming as well. However, giftedness has been documented as existing across the lifespan. Mistakenly, too many in education have been slow to realize the significance of this or ignore it altogether.

What are the main obstacles to continuing GT programming at the secondary level? Most secondary GT programs are fed through existing primary programs; poor identification and lack of options weaken viability. GT programming must be supported by strong advocacy from faculty and administrators; sadly, something too often missing. Secondary scheduling, too, can be difficult for any student when so many factors are involved – available classes, faculty and facilities.

There are some innovative ways to include gifted classes in middle and high schools. Innovation needs to be based on acceptance that gifted classes should be demonstrably different from general education. Middle and high school GT classes reap the greatest benefit in standalone programming; both academically and social-emotionally.

How do you approach middle/high school students who weren’t challenged at elementary level? Teachers and parents shouldn’t shy away from providing remedial   or special skills classes to catch up GT students in specific areas. Professional development should be offered to teachers on identifying underachievers and/or 2E students.

What gets included in a GT student’s schedule should balance academics with passions; including the Arts. Students, parents and school personnel can make the best decisions when lines of communication are fully open.

Academic competitions can supplement a GT student’s schedule, but shouldn’t be considered a replacement. Many GT students love and thrive in academic competitions with intellectual peers; but it isn’t GT programming. For some of these students who lack a competitive spirit, it isn’t an answer at all.

Mentorships, internships and research projects can enhance GT programming, but not sufficient as standalone options. GT HS students should be engaged in college-level pursuits with adequate supports to ensure success. A transcript of the chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Uppervention: Meeting the Needs of Gifted & Talented Students

Meeting Needs of G&T Students: Case Study of Virtual Learning Lab in Rural Middle School (pdf)

Services for Secondary Students Who are Gifted Questions & Answers (pdf)

Tips for Teachers: Successful Strategies for Teaching Gifted Learners

Mentorship & Gifted Youth

The Myth of Gifted Curriculum: Rethinking Bloom’s Taxonomy (p. 6, pdf)

UK: Policy for Meeting the Needs of the Most Able, Gifted & Talented Boys (pdf)

Meeting the Needs of Gifted & Talented Students (Book Depository)

Attitudes of AP Teachers Meeting 21st Century Critical Thinking Needs of GT Secondary Students (pdf)

AP & IB Programs: A “Fit” for Gifted Learners?

2 Wrongs Don’t Make a Right: Sacrificing Needs of GT Ss Doesn’t Solve Society’s Unsolved Problems (pdf)

Educating Gifted Students in Middle School: A Practical Guide

How Are Districts Meeting the Needs of Gifted Students?

TX: GT Teacher Toolkit II Resources for teachers of G/T, AP and Pre-AP Classes

Placement in Talent Development (2000)

UT High School Professional Development

Cybraryman’s Multiple Intelligences and Multipotentiality Page

Cybraryman’s Growth Mindset Page

Do you have a Book to Share?

Photo courtesy of Pixabay    CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

“Gifted Unschooling” with Guest, Amy Harrington

gtchat April 17 Amy Harrington

 

Amy Harrington, Esq. is a SENG board member and SENG Model Parent Group facilitator, homeschooling advocate, and an eclectic unschooler of two profoundly gifted children. She is an attorney, writer, and blogger (Gifted Unschooling) who is passionate about the future of self-directed education. She is the Founder and Managing Director of Atypical Minds, which provides coaching and guidance to gifted families in their quest for alternative education and school accommodations.

Most people are familiar with homeschooling, but the idea of ‘unschooling’ remains a mystery to most. As Amy explained, “Unschooling is a philosophy that entrusts children to find their own passions. It is child-led, passion-led, and interest-led learning. Unschooling generally rejects a traditional schooling mindset and the tools that go along with it – curriculum. The child is in the driver’s seat of their own education. Children are autonomous learners SUPPORTED by parents.”

The discussion then turned to ‘deschooling”. According to Amy, “deschooling is letting go of a traditional schooling mindset and learning to trust the process of getting to unschooling philosophy. It let’s everyone relax, detox and figure out what they are interested in learning. We shed our old mindset and embrace freedom.”

What is the role of a mentor in unschooling? Mona Chicks explained, “Mentors play a huge role, as they help the child learn about the real stuff in their chosen field.  They provide outside input, too.” Amy told us that “Not everyone has mentors while unschooling but my kid has enjoyed working with many professors and entrepreneurs.”

When it was suggested that a compromise or blended learning scenario could be used to ensure comparable results such as regular education and outside-of-school enrichment, most unschoolers disagreed. They believed that for profoundly gifted students and prodigies, school was actually detrimental. Many referred to a ‘healing’ process that their children went through after withdrawing from a traditional school environment.

A transcript of this chat may be found on our Storify Page.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 11 AM NZST/9 AM AEST to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our new Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

A Daily Guide to Radically Unschooling Outliers

6 Ways Unschooling Can Inform Practice for Innovative Educators

Free to Learn: Why Unleashing Instinct to Play Will Make Children Happier, More Self-Reliant (Amazon)

How Do Unschoolers Cope with College & 21 Questions on Learning without School & Living Joyfully

We Don’t Need No Education

Unshackled & Unschooled: Free-Range Learning Movement Grows

How to Opt Out of School: Guide for Teens for Self-Directed Education

Freedom of Unschooling: Raising Liberated Black Children Without Restrictions of School

Raising a Profoundly Gifted Child

How do Unschoolers Turn Out?

Unschooling: What is It & How One Family Does It

Home Grown: Adventures in Parenting Off the Beaten Path, Unschooling, & Reconnecting (Amazon)

“Unschooled” Kids Do Just Fine in College

Unschooling Allowing Students A New Approach At Education (Video 2:55)

Deschooling: Shift Your Mind

Why I Choose to Unschool My Gifted Children

Hacking Your Education: Ditch the Lectures, Save Tens of Thousands, and Learn More Than Your Peers Ever Will (Amazon)

John Holt Growing Without Schooling FAQs

Unleashing Genius: Self-Directed Learning

EXPERT: 85% Of College Students Are Wasting Their Time And Money

Rethinking Education: Self-Directed Learning Fits the Digital Age

Blake Boles Website

TED Talk with Ken Robinson: How Schools Kill Creativity

TED Talk with Sugata Mitra: The Child-Driven Education

Maximalist Manifesto: Creating a Prepared Environment

Guest: Celi Trépanier, Author of ‘Educating Your Gifted Child How One PS Teacher Embraced Homeschooling’

Celi-Trepanier-Image-150x120

Celi Trépanier

 

Author, Celi Trépanier, joined us this week to chat about her new book Educating Your Gifted Child How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling from Gifted Homeschoolers Forum Press. It is part of their Perspectives in Gifted Homeschooling Series. Celi also blogs at Crushing Tall Poppies which chronicles her journey as the parent of three gifted sons and as a new homeschooler.

 

Celi Trepanier Educating Your Gifted Child Book Cover

In her own words, Celi writes, as “a homeschooling mom, and a former public school teacher, I’ve been on both sides of the fence of education, gifted education, homeschooling, and gifted children.” Throughout the chat, it was clear that she is a fierce advocate for the rights of all children to receive an appropriate education that meets their needs and for teachers to be given support to make that happen.

In response to the question – Could traditional schools make any changes to better meet the needs of gifted learners? – Celi said, “Yes. A huge transformation is needed to meet current needs. We need to return education back to our teachers and parents.” Others agreed that much would have to change to address the gifted learner in public schools …

“Yes, but it would require LOTS of training and finding the proper teachers to do so.” ~ @yesteach, an elementary gifted ed teacher and specialist from Texas

“It is time to move out of the industrial age of education.” ~ @MrGelston, math educator from Massachusetts

“Identifying busy work and eliminating it. Making sure what kids do has real meaning.” ~ @Create_Miracles, gifted coach from Colorado

“Take back the classroom. Educate our administrators as well as to needs of gifted learners AND educate our elected officials for the need. Funding is pitiful for the specialist and teacher training.” ~ @teachfine, gifted specialist from Alabama

“I worry that we see education as working for most. I think it works for few. How do we stop conceptualizing reform as for the edges?” ~ @ProfBrandelyn, teacher educator from Ohio

There are signs to look for when traditional school is not working for a gifted children. Among those mentioned included boredom, depression, acting out, fear of failure, refusing to go to school, and unhappiness. Parents should watch for children becoming reticent about sharing news from school and for mood swings.

The decision to homeschool should not be taken lightly. Celi suggested, “Each family likely will have its own unique list of factors to consider like finances, time commitment, state laws, and feasibility.” Mr. Gelston asked, “Can you let go of traditional learning and move to a child centered model based on passion?” Everyone agreed that the child should be a part of the decision with one exception; when a child is in an abusive situation, but too young to know.

GHF 10th Anniversary Logo

Resources for homeschooling today are endless (Celi Trépanier) and can be found practically everywhere. Online, Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has an extensive array on their website. Libraries, museums and science centers all offer classes and chances for homeschoolers to socialize. Many areas have homeschool cooperatives where children can learn subjects from experts. And we appreciated the sentiment shared by GHF Executive Director, Corin Goodwin, ” Actually, I think #gtchat is a pretty darned good resource, too!” A full transcript may be found at Storify. Questions for this chat were posted to our Facebook Page.

Have you decided to homeschool your gifted child? We would love to hear your story and the reasons you made this decision. Please leave a comment below!

gtchat thumbnail logoGlobal #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling (Amazon)

Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling

Celi Trépanier’s Author Page at Gifted Homeschoolers Forum

Crushing Tall Poppies (Celi’s Blog)

Crushing Tall Poppies (YouTube)

Celi Trépanier on Pinterest

Crushing Tall Poppies (Facebook)

Educating Your Gifted Child by Celi Trépanier Preview

My Interview with Celi Trépanier

Book Review: Educating Your Gifted Child: How One Public School Teacher Embraced Homeschooling

I Thought Homeschooling My Kids Would Be Simple. I Was Wrong.

TED Talk: How Schools Kill Creativity

Class Dismissed – The Movie

Report: # & % Children Ages 5-17 Who Were Homeschooled 2011-12

Learnist For Teachers: 5 Homeschool Resources

Cybraryman’s Homeschool Page

A Call For Homeschool 2.0

The Techies Who Are Hacking Education by Homeschooling Their Kids

The “Horse Story” of Gifted Education

{Book Review} “Educating Your Gifted Child” from Pamela Price

 

Photos/graphics courtesy of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum.

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