Blog Archives

What to Do When School’s Gifted Program is Cut or Curtailed

Why is gifted education funding consistently targeted and to whom should advocates reach out to reinstate funding for gifted programs? There is a stigma attached to funding gifted education that gifted learners do not need additional support. This diminishes the entire idea of an appropriate education; that an entire population of students does not need to be taught. When advocating for gifted education, reach out to local decision makers first. Determine the source of funding and engage with lawmakers at the appropriate level with reasoned arguments in a respectful tone.

“Gifted education is often misunderstood as a luxury for privileged kids. ALL kids have needs, and gifted kids may have needs as complex as any other kids do. True education advocates are there for all kids.”~ Jeremy Bond 

Gifted organizations are a source of information useful in conversations with decision makers. Most make this information available through their websites. Many gifted organizations provide resources for local and state members that include lists of available advocates and speakers in their area as well as contracted liaisons to governmental bodies who update lawmakers.

Local schools and communities benefit from recognizing the needs of gifted students as school districts are pushed to create high-quality curriculum resources and develop well trained teachers to provide them. Local businesses are the recipients of a highly qualified workforce which dissuades them from having to outsource jobs.

How does cutting gifted education disproportionally affect students in rural school districts? Rural school districts begin with a more modest budget for funding education in general. When special needs populations are taken into consideration, gifted education is rarely seen as a priority. If available funds for gifted education are small to begin with, GT students in rural areas may run the risk of not having programs at all regardless of need.

Teachers who recognize the needs of their GT students often work to provide these students with additional opportunities by creating after-school programs, mentoring students, and acting as coaches for academic competitions. Within the classroom, many teachers will differentiate curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of their GT students and seek out professional development in gifted education.

What can parents do to counter budget cuts for gifted education in their child’s school? Parents are integral to the entire budgetary process. As voters, they are important to lawmakers who decide education budgets. Their voice can make a difference in how their representatives view gifted education. Parents should remain vigilant about gifted education funding for their child’s school. They can engage with lawmakers by letting them know the importance of GT funding and joining state gifted organizations’ advocacy efforts. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

This week we celebrated the wonderful support we have received from the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for the past 7 years! We look forward to the next 7 years!

 

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 1PM NZST/11 AM AEST/Midnight UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

OH: Hamilton City Schools Cut Full-time Gifted Programs Due to Budget Concerns

Gifted In Arizona

NZ: Restored Funding and Hope for Gifted Education

Massachusetts’ State Gifted Board Member Speaks before Governor’s Budget Committee

Cluster Grouping of Gifted Students: How to Provide Full-Time Services on a Part-Time Budget

The Forgotten Rural Gifted Child

TAGT: From a Nation Deceived to a Nation Empowered A Never-Ending Story (pdf – p. 6)

NAGC Statement on Administration’s FY2020 Budget: Supporting All Gifted and Talented Children is an Equity Issue

First-Ever Poll of Voters about Gifted Learners Finds Strong Bipartisan Support for Increasing Funding and Resources for High-Potentials Students

NAGC 2019 Leadership & Advocacy Conference

This is Us … Too: The Need for Gifted Education

Gifted and Talented Education: A Review of Relevant Literature (pdf)

What to Look for in a Good Gifted Program

Cybraryman’s Gifted Advocacy Page

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Image courtesy of Pixabay CC0 Public Domain

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

Let’s Talk Advocacy

gtchat 09272018 Advocacy

GT advocacy is a long and winding road. For parents, it feels like it begins shortly after the birth of their child and continues to the point where their child takes over and self-advocates. It is the realization that it is a requisite for all those responsible for the education and care of a child who is identified as GT.

This week, our guest at #gtchat was Heather Vaughn. She is the K-12 Educational Outreach Coordinator at the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life, Moody College of Communication at the University of Texas in Austin. Heather has been recognized by the National Association for Gifted Children and the Texas Association for Gifted and Talented for her contributions in creating and championing services for gifted students as well as serving on the #gtchat Advisory Board. She holds a M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction and Gifted and Talented from the University of Mississippi, and an Ed.S. in Educational Psychology from the University of Georgia.

Educators advocating for the needs of GT students should take the time to seek out professional development involving gifted education. A knowledgeable advocate will always be a good advocate. Parents advocating for the needs of their GT child can be a best advocate by listening to their child and using their concerns to direct any and all advocacy efforts. Advocacy will be for naught if the child isn’t a full partner in the process.

“Knowledge is power. Sharing your GT experiences with administrators, district staff and elected officials gives current and future decisions a face, a personal story. Share through social media, letters, emails, phone calls and in face to face meetings.” ~ Heather Vaughn

Self-advocacy goes hand in hand with maturity and understanding of one’s own desire to grow and learn. GT students gain self-confidence when allowed to speak on their own behalf; an authentic outcome of self-awareness. It brings with it respect and that encourages a well measured response to the student’s needs by those adults tasked with providing gifted interventions for & necessary challenge to the student.

Students should be encouraged to become active participants in their communities and to investigate issues of personal interest facing their community. One possibility is to identify a cause and start an advocacy campaign. Starting an advocacy campaign requires the support of the student’s teacher and parents. Educators provide students with the time and resources to study potential causes and support the development of an action plan centering on finding and implementing solutions. Parents can serve as role models by taking an active role in civic duties and encouraging their children to become involved as well.

On identifying a cause and starting an advocacy campaign: “Ask students to write out their action plan. Guide them through primary and secondary research to learn more about the problem and see who they need to contact to instigate change. Encourage partnerships with community leaders and groups. Encourage students to look at communities around them (classroom, school, club, neighborhood) and brainstorm in groups. What are some problems? What are potential solutions? Guide respectful discussion to select the most plausible solution.” ~ Speak Up! Speak Out

Check out the links below to find resources that aid gifted students in taking action and find a transcript of this chat at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Effective Advocates (pdf)

Advocating for Gifted Programs in Your Local Schools

Administrator Toolbox

Fearless Advocacy: A Day in the Life of a Gifted Child’s Parent

TEMPO: Advocating for Appropriate Education for Your Child

Advocating for Exceptionally Gifted Young People A Guidebook (pdf – updated 2018)

Tips for Parents: Advocacy – Working with Your Child’s School

Individual Instruction Plan Menu for the Gifted Child

Communicating Effectively with Your Gifted Child’s School

7 Ways to Advocate for Your Gifted Child

Are You an Advocate for the Gifted?

How to Make a Civics Education Stick

From the Community: Meeting of the Minds

Teenagers Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo Wrote a Textbook to Help Students Develop Racial Literacy

Digital Civics Toolkit

Houston’s Student Congress Launches New Civic Fellowship

Fort River Sixth-Graders Engage Local Officials in Civics

Teaching Channel:  Preparing Youth for Civics & Politics in the Digital Age – Creating Digital Stories (Video 10:04)

Elevating AP for Gifted Learners (pdf)

Action Civics (pdf)

Legacy Book Awards 2018 Nominee: The Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners Teaching the 4 Essential Steps to Success (Free Spirit Publishing)

The Power of Self-Advocacy for Gifted Learners

Nurturing Self-Advocacy

Gifted Advocacy: What’s the Point?

Communicating with the Community

Understanding the Media

Speak Up! Speak Out!

Cybraryman’s Gifted Advocacy Page

Sprite’s Site: Advocacy – Just Ask Sprite and Co.

Sprite’s Site: Asking for Help – A Guest Expert Panel Q&A Session

Hoagies’ Blog Hop October 2014: Advocacy

65 Ways Students Can Share Student Voice

Graphic courtesy of Heather Vaughn.

New Year, New Resolve

gtchat-01102017-new-year-new-resolve

 

 

The first chat of 2017 saw many familiar faces from across the U.S. and the globe! It was exciting to see many participants who had not been able to join us in recent months and their presence is always appreciated. All participants shared ways in which they would resolve to serve and advocate for gifted children in the new year. You may review a transcript of the chat at Storify and take a moment to check out the links from the chat below.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 14.00 NZST/12.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

New Year’s Resolutions for Parents of Gifted Kids via @Giftedkidsguide

New Year’s Activities for Gifted Kids and Their Families

4 Year Old Explains the Problem with New Year Resolutions (YouTube 1:55)

I Will Treasure You: Resolutions for My Gifted Child

2016 Year in Review and Predictions for 2017

Gifted Advocacy: A Call to Action

How to Make New Year’s Resolutions You’ll Actually Keep

Your New Year’s Resolution: Make a Plan!

7 Smart New Year’s Resolutions for Students

Now That’s a Good Question! How to Promote Cognitive Rigor Through Classroom Questioning

Sprite’s Site: The Dabrowski Dogs Make New Year Resolutions

Plymouth Gifted: Words to Ponder

World Council for Gifted and Talented Children (WCGTC) 22nd Biennial World Conference in Sydney, Australia

Gifted Family Travel

Educators: The Lessons We Learned in 2016

The G Word: A New Documentary about Giftedness

Photo courtesy of PixabayCC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

How to Use Twitter to Advocate for Gifted Education

gtchat 03222016 Advocate with Twitter

 

This week, #gtchat celebrated 4 years of support from the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented. Pictured below is the staff of TAGT and our Advisory Board. I am so thankful for the support they give me each and every week. #gtchat simply would not be possible without it. They are always a phone call or email away.

 

gtchat Thanks TAGT Staff

Texas Association for the Gifted & Talented Staff

 

gtchat Advisory Board 2016

Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT Advisory Board

 

During the TAGT 2015 in December, the question came up in one of my sessions, “How can we use Twitter to advocate for gifted education?” This led to the topic for this week’s #gtchat. Although I am admittedly biased, I believe Twitter is the best form of social media to use for advocacy. It is concise; to the point; and without the ‘drama’ of other platforms. As pointed out by #gtchat Advisor, Lisa Van Gemert, “Twitter is less susceptible to the echo chamber that you get in Facebook.” Twitter encourages and facilitates creation of communities with shared interests, desires, end goals. (Putnam) Twitter chats with a recognizable and unique hashtag promote a continuing conversation over time. Using appropriate hashtags wisely allows advocates to reach beyond the ‘choir’; outside the box.

“Twitter is less susceptible to the echo chamber that you get in Facebook.”

~ Lisa Van Gemert, the Gifted Guru

Advocacy via Twitter can be accomplished by retweeting, hashtagging and liking tweets. One can use Twitter to identify gifted education advocates or organizations and build relationships by ‘following’; using DMs; and adding to lists.  The strategic success of advocacy via Twitter requires a fluid and an evolving approach to using social media. Over time, other forms of social media may be used to supplement the reach of Twitter by tapping audience preferences.

“Twitter brings a much wider conversation; other social media can become silos.” ~ Dr. Brian Housand

How can gifted organizations use Twitter to advocate for gifted education/children & benefit their members? As the quote below reminds us, on Twitter organizations can simultaneously provide information, foster involvement and promote advocacy. (Lovejoy and Saxton) must commit to a

gtchat Organizations Information

long-term presence on social media; specifically Twitter and eschew ‘quick result’ strategies. Twitter provides conduit to reaching existing supporters and potential audiences; i.e., educators needing gifted classroom strategies. The ‘community’ paradigm can extend to fostering interaction between organizations for the greater good. Twitter can be used to forge an authentic voice; replicate print and web communications; and as a conversational tool. Organizations can also use Twitter to share information on upcoming conferences, webinars, and chats; always using hashtags to widen reach.

gtchat Tweet Smart

Parents, too, can use Twitter to advocate for gifted children and their education. Parents meeting on Twitter can facilitate in real life meetings for kids and their peers. By Participating in Twitter chats related to gifted education and gifted students, they are able to affirm positive messages about these kids. In several states, parents along with advocates have combined forces to use Twitter to effectively appeal to politicians considering gifted education legislation. Tracy Fisher, #gtchat Advisor, told us, “Part of advocating is LEARNING! They can lurk, ask experts for info, etc.”

“It is easy to share with several groups of people by using multiple hashtags.” ~ Tyler Clark, Executive Assistant of the World Council for Gifted & Talented Children

Twitter is often used at gifted conferences as a backchannel for attendees as well as presenters. It is used to initially promote and raise awareness about upcoming conferences. Then, Conference attendees can use conference-specific hashtags to tweet from sessions. Presenters use Twitter to connect with their audience and get immediate feedback during sessions. It’s even a great way to plan Tweet-ups at the conferences!

“Commentary tweets and special twitter sessions from conferences can give people a vicarious feeling of attending.” ~ Jo Freitag, Gifted Resources & Sprite’s Site

 

“A conference can encourage social media participation before and during the conference; including all!” Carolyn K., Hoagies Gifted

Finally, we discussed how to  use Twitter to connect with peers and colleagues to advocate for gifted issues. Gifted advocates can connect with leaders in the field in real-time to tweet issues important to all. It can be used to acknowledge accomplishments within the gifted community; announce new books; and link to relevant blog posts. Users can encourage followers to connect by tagging them in tweets and graphics. It’s an excellent way to build communities of like-minded advocates. A transcript of the chat may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at  Noon  NZST/110.00 AEST/1.00 UK (Subject to change due to Daylight Savings Time). to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Cybraryman’s Educational Websites Page

Sprite’s Site: The Twitter Stream

gtchat Sprites Site Twitter Stream

Cybraryman’s Educational Sites: Edcamps, Teach Meets and Conferences

Sprite’s Site: Global GT Chat on Twitter

gtchat Sprites Site GT Chat on Twitter

Tweeting Social Change: How Social Media are Changing Nonprofit Advocacy

How Organizations Use Social Media: Engaging the Public

Tweet, Tweet! Using Live Twitter Chats in Social Work Education

8 Tips for Effectively Using Social Media for Social Change

Cases on Strategic Social Media Utilization in the Nonprofit Sector (Amazon)

Connecting with Social Media to Drive Change (Amazon)

Users of the World, Unite! The Challenges & Opportunities of Social Media (pdf 2010)

Social Media Best Practices for Nonprofit Organizations (pdf)

Information, Community & Action: How Nonprofit Organizations Use Social Media (Prezi)

Dialogic Connections (Shaw) (pdf)

Chirping for Charity: How U.S. Nonprofits are Using Twitter to Foster Dialogic Communication (pdf)

 

Photos courtesy of morgueFile , Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain , Jo Freitag

Graphics courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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