Category Archives: Multipotentiality

The Many Faces of Gifted

gtchat 01122016 Many Faces of Gifted

 

The many faces of giftedness often look quite different depending on the characteristics used and who is making the judgement. Early on in the discussion, Jen Merrill, author and blogger at Laughing at Chaos,  pointed out appropriately so that we shouldn’t be looking at ‘types’ of giftedness but rather differences in ‘wiring’ or ‘strengths’ among gifted children.

Although arguments have been made for and against labeling gifted children, we considered the consequences which occur when children are mislabeled or not identified at all. Gifted children often ‘feel different’ from their age-peers and when not identified or mislabeled, they can feel confused. They may be placed in an inappropriate educational setting, miss valuable opportunities, or receive a medical misdiagnosis. According to Gail Post, Clinical Psychologist, “At worst, [it] could result in depression, despair, isolation; always feeling there is something wrong with them,”

What do we risk by equating ‘gifted’ only with high academic achievement? Many gifted children never achieve academically as their areas of strength may lay elsewhere. Talents outside the academic realm may never be realized if only academic achievement is considered. As Jeremy Bond expressed, “We risk getting it spectacularly wrong. Our most gifted leaders weren’t correlated with school “achievement” (whatever that is).”

Intellectual giftedness can get overlooked as well when considering twice-exceptional students and those from culturally different or diverse populations. Disabilities can be more visible and obstruct the viewpoint of adults responsible for identification. Too many educational professionals lack the necessary expertise in cultural differences & diverse populations. As #gtchat adviser, Krissy Venosdale, told us, “I honestly can’t think of a field in education where there is more bias, preconceived notions, misunderstandings than gifted.”

Highly gifted children are at particular risk for medical misdiagnosis that fails to recognize giftedness. Many areas such as ADHD share characteristics with giftedness making diagnosis difficult. Most medical professionals have had little to no training about gifted characteristics. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at  1 AM (1.00) in the UK,  2 PM (14.00) NZDT/Noon (12.00) AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found atStorify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Many Faces of Giftedness: Lifting the Masks (Amazon)

The Misunderstood Face of Giftedness via @MarianneKuz

Handbook for Counselors Serving Students with Gifts &Talents: Development, Relationships, School (Amazon)

Misdiagnosis & Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children & Adults

Trading Beyond the Mark: Supporting the Genius of Disobedient Thought

The Faces of Gifted: A Resource for Educators & Parents

The Varied Faces of Gifted/Talented Students (pdf)

Many Faces of Gifted (PPT pdf) by Dr James T Webb

Revised Profiles of the Talented & Gifted 2010 (pdf) by Betts and Neihart

Changing Our View of Gifted Learners

GT Chat: Labels: Good, Bad, or Simply Wrong

Sprite’s Site: Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 3

Hoagies’ Gifted: Testing and Assessment

Cybraryman: Twice-Exceptional Children

Gifted Homeschoolers Forum: Healthcare Providers’ Guide to Gifted Children (downloadable guide)

SENG Misdiagnosis Initiative: Reducing the Risk of Medical Misdiagnosis

Gifted Homeschoolers Forum Blog Hop: Discovering the Depth and Breadth of Giftedness

Hoagies’ Gifted Blog Hop: Ages & Stages of Giftedness

 

Photo Courtesy: Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain

Graphic Courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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High Costs of Raising Gifted Children

gtchat 11202015 High Cost Gifted Children

Raising children today is an expensive proposition for any parent; but, perhaps even more so for parents of children identified as gifted. At this week’s chat, we discussed primarily economic factors; but many people expressed concerns related to social and emotional costs. It was noted that this as well as several other related topics will have to be considered in upcoming chats.

One of the first expenses encountered by parents can be that of out-of-school testing; either to dispute in-school testing or to provide testing that the school is unwilling to do for a wide variety of reasons. Testing may include both intelligence testing, mental health testing; etc. Also, it often needs to be repeated if initially done early, when the child enters the teen years. Financially, testing can cost thousands of dollars and involve travel expenses to distant testing facilities. These costs can be out of reach for many families.

When advocacy fails resulting in a gifted child not receiving an appropriate education, many parents turn to homeschooling, charter schools, private schools or residential schools. There are some schools for the profoundly gifted in the U.S. which are free or low-cost, but available seats are few and far between. Again, these options are not feasible for all parents.

Homeschoolers often must provide their own curriculum and with gifted children this can mean buying multiple years’ worth of materials every year. Add to this loss of income for a parent provider, extracurricular activities, online classes; and you can see how quickly expenses can add up. Private and charter schools can mean added transportation costs.

Parents of gifted children are always looking for ways to enrich and supplement their child’s education regardless of where they attend school. These costs can include summer camps, online coursework, tutoring, additional reading materials, and educational games/toys.

The chat then turned to the question of costs associated with Early College. A form of acceleration, there are costs of which many people were not aware. Besides the fact that college expenses can come years earlier than anticipated; there are issues pertaining to differences in the awarding of scholarships (merit scholarships are rarely offered to a transfer student), qualifying for financial aid, and loss of child support in the case of divorce. Age-related costs include transportation costs (student not old enough to drive), participation in field trips and college abroad programs (parents generally need to accompany student), work-study (student not old enough to work), and even using campus health centers.

The costs of providing for the many needs of a gifted child do come with a price tag, and  it often can be very high. Although gifted children may be more expensive to raise than their age peers, #gtchat has provided links below to articles with practical advice on how to mitigate those expenses and find the best solutions to finding appropriate educational and enrichment opportunities for your child. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays 13.00 NZDT/11.00 AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

The Hidden Costs of Having a Gifted Child

How Do You Raise a Prodigy?

Additional Child Support for Extraordinary Expenses in New Jersey

An Accelerated Journey

How Much Does It Cost to Raise a Child Prodigy?

The Cost of Raising a Gifted Child (Video 21:41)

It Pays to Have a Smart Child, but It Can Cost, Too

Olympians’ Parents Pay the Cost of Achieving Gold

Gifted Children: Myths & Realities (Amazon)

17 Wishes for Making Parenting Gifted Easier

How Much Does It Cost to Raise a Child Star?

What Can Child Support Be Used For?

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

“Smart Girls” with author, Dr. @RobynMcKay

gtchat 10302015 Smart Girls

 

This week we were joined by Dr. Robyn McKay, co-author of Smart Girls and founder of the website ‘She{ology}’. The discussion centered around smart girls – how they are viewed by society, barriers they face and strategies to use to become successful.

It was quickly pointed out that smart girls often don’t fit society’s image of ‘smart’; nor do they always meet a particular school’s image of ‘smart’. Robyn explained, “Smart girls are often too well-adjusted for their own good. Like chameleons, they adapt and fit in instead of stand out. They begin to hide ability by grade 5. They stop raising their hands in class and whisper the answer to their bff instead.  The trend of hiding ability continues thru high school, college, and their professional life [in adulthood].”

Mental health issues can arise for smart girls. Robyn told us, ” They are good at masking disabilities like anxiety, depression, and ADHD (inattentive type). They mask because they CAN.  Smart girls use their intellectual resources to fit in and manage their disabilities. Just think how creative twice-exceptional smart girls could be if they didn’t have to work so hard to mask anxiety depression or ADHD.”

Next we considered what it meant to be smart and a girl in today’s world. Robyn said, “Intellectually able women often discount their intellect and credit hard work and luck to their success. They often don’t believe that they are smart. Although smart woman are able to juggle many responsibilities and have it all, this can also lead to burn out and early exit from careers.” Add to this that attempts to define ‘smart’ for women have been colored by ideas of gender, race and culture.

“We need to educate all students about gender disparities, inequalities in life and empower them to not just overcome but challenge them.” ~ Tyler Murphy, Kentucky educator

In the book Smart Girls, Dr. McKay and co-author Dr. Barbara Kerr made it a point to leave out definitions of giftedness that include sensitivities, intensities, or overexcitabilities as they focused on talent development. We ask Robyn to clarify this approach. Her response was, “Research has not linked overexcitabilities, intensities or sensitivities to academic achievement, high performance at work, or life satisfaction – the predictions we were interested in. Focus on OE sensitivity or intensity can cause us to pathologize giftedness; to make it seem as if strong, even maladaptive, reactions are a sign of giftedness rather than a sign of a very frustrated, bored or troubled child.”

Then we turned our attention to the barriers smart girls face in having their intelligence recognized. Previous flawed research assumed women could not achieve eminence. Barriers to recognition of intelligence can include environment, race, appearance and privilege. Robyn noted, “Gifted underachievers – who don’t “look gifted” because they don’t get As in every class are often overlooked. Creative girls with uneven performance in school are over looked – get As in the classes they love and and Cs and Ds in the classes that bore them and fail the classes they hate.” Furthermore, Robyn told us, “Smart girls need to know: what’s her IQ? What’s her personality profile? These help her understand why she is the way she is. Armed with data, her self-esteem rises.”

Finally, what are some strategies smart girls can use to succeed in the 21st century? Don’t allow society’s views dissuade your ambition – work toward your passions. For young gifted girls, encourage imaginative play, a healthy diet and adequate sleep. Encourage choices that help girls fulfill their dreams; realize their ‘future self’.

Robyn offered this advice to smart girls, “Don’t date “potential” – don’t date people who aren’t chasing their own goals and dreams. Make career decisions based on your creative flow and strengths. Say “yes” to new experiences. Get support for your mental health. Anxiety, depression, eating disorders keep you from living your dreams. Get As in the classes you love and Bs in everything else. You don’t have to be perfect.”

Transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

gtchat-logo-new bannner

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7E/6C/5M/4P in the U.S., Midnight in the UK and Saturdays Noon NZDT/10 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Smart Girls in the 21st Century: Understanding Talented Girls & Women (Amazon)

Gifted Parenting Support: Smart Girls in the 21st Century

Smart Girls Takes Silver in the 2015 Benjamin Franklin Awards

Celebrating Smart Girls in the 21st Century with Dr. Barbara Kerr at The Psychology Podcast

Reviews for Smart Girls in the 21st Century

Dr. Robyn McKay’s Website ‘she{ology}’

About Dr. Robyn McKay

When Intensity Goes to School: Overexcitabilities, Creativity and the Gifted Child (Google Books Preview)

Educated in Romance: Women, Achievement and College Culture (Amazon)

Gifted Girls – Many Gifted Girls, Few Eminent Women: Why? (pdf)

Gifted Women: Identity & Expression

Harnessing Gifted Girls’ Emotional Strengths

What About Gifted Girls

Gender and Genius

Gender Identity and the Overexcitability Profiles of Gifted College Students (pdf)

The Effect of Gender-Role Stereotyping on the Career Aspirations and Expectations of Pre-Adolescent Children of High Intellectual Ability (pdf 1967)

The Intersection of Gender Equity and Gifted Elementary Education: Does Numerical Parity Tell the Whole Story (pdf)

Why Women Still Can’t Have It All

A Mighty Girl (website)

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Multipotentiality – Do You Have Too Many Tabs Open?

Multipotentiality

 

“Do you have too many tabs open?” proved to be a rhetorical question during this week’s chat on Twitter. For many the answer was “yes” and defining multipotentiality was much easier than living with it. Many definitions were offered – from having the potential to pursue many different passions and succeed to “the risk of becoming a pretty good generalist at the risk of specialization” (Amy Harrington). To another participant (Denise @ddigiova) multipotentiality meant, “Never [being] bored. Always learning. Always growing. Diverse experiences and relationships.”

“Ultimately [multipotentials] have to make a choice – what is most meaningful, fits with one’s values.” ~ Dr. Gail Post 

Although gifted people may not be good at everything, they are often good at many things. It was quickly noted that the benefits are often the drawbacks as well. So many paths can cause high stress levels, overscheduling, confusion and depression. Multipotential persons often find it difficult to choose a career or when they do; sticking with it. For gifted students who display multipotentiality, they often are never challenged until college when studies become difficult.

Finding focus is an important facet of dealing with multipotentiality. Lisa B. of Canada suggested that, “Perhaps it’s best to focus on one passion at a time, but move through different passions in the different seasons of life.” Seeking inspiration from peers and mentors can help a multipotential person focus on their passions. Dr. Gail Post stated, “Ultimately [multipotentials] have to make a choice – what is most meaningful, fits with one’s values.”

Advice for parents: “Emphasize the importance of continually learning and taking on new challenges; not settling because they’ve been labeled as ‘smart’.” ~ Amy Williams

Finally, the discussion turned to guiding a multipotential child. Parents should attempt to tune into their child’s passions and look for ways to help them explore ideas and potential careers. They can also expose children throughout their lives to opportunities to work with peers, mentors, and professionals. Amy Williams summed it up this way, “Emphasize the importance of continually learning and taking on new challenges; not settling because they’ve been labeled as ‘smart’.” For a more in-depth review of this chat, see the transcript at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Multipotentiality: When High Ability Leads to Too Many Options from Lisa Rivero

Counseling Gifted Adults – A Case Study by Paula Prober

Multipotentiality Among the Intellectually Gifted: “It Was Never There & Already It’s Vanishing” (pdf)

A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Teens: Living with Intense & Creative Adolescents (Amazon)

Good at Too Many Things? from Byrdseed Gifted

Experience of Giftedness: Eight Great Gripes Six Years Later from Davidson Gifted

Multipotentiality: Multiple Talents, Multiple Challenges by Douglas Eby

Multipotentiality Resources from Douglas Eby

The Gifted Adult: A Revolutionary Guide for Liberating Everyday Genius (Amazon)

Developing Multiple Talents – The Personal Side of Creative Expression by Douglas Eby

Refuse to Choose! A Revolutionary Program for Doing Everything That You Love (Amazon)

Multipotentiality: Issues & Considerations for Career Planning from Duke TIP

Career Development in Gifted Students & Multipotentiality (pdf)

Cybraryman’s Multipotentiality Page

The Perils of Multipotentiality

Multipotentiality

Are You A Multipotentialite*? from Paula Prober

On Crystals, Psychosynthesis & Unearthing Your Multipotentiality

Many Cloaks in the Closet by Jen Merrill

A Multi-Talent’s Growth with Dr. Edith Johnston

A Myriad of Ideas: Personal Development for Multi-Talented Individuals (book) by Dr. Edith Johnston

Are Multipotentialites the Innovators of the Future?

9 Ways to Explain Your Multipotentiality to Non-Mulitpotentialites

Why David Bowie is a Prime Example of Multipotentiality

Multipotentiality: It’s a Thing

Forever at a Crossroads: A Tale of Multipotentiality

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