Category Archives: Higher Education

Gifted Students in Secondary/Higher Education

At the high school level, there are many ‘options’ for GT students which may include AP, IB, magnet schools, honors classes, or dual enrollment. Additional ‘options’ are early entrance (plus other types of acceleration), talent searches, and distance education classes. Higher education programs include Honors Programs designed as cohorts, accelerated curriculum, study abroad, or mentorships.

Nothing wrong with AP, etc, or honors programs, but they tend to be focused on high achievers. An AP or honors class is only as good for a GT kid as the teacher or prof in charge. If they get GT, it’s great… if not… it can be a struggle ~ Clint Rodriguez, Secondary Gifted Specialist in Dallas, TX 

The impact of a challenging curriculum on GT secondary students can motivate students to become leaders and find success in gifted programs. Research has found a strong correlation between support for the whole student/environmental factors and student success,

Providing mentoring programs to secondary GT students have been found to be key to their identity development. Mentoring programs can provide secondary and college GT students with the opportunity to connect with their local communities and develop networks for future career prospects. Mentors of GT students in higher education are role models for success and hope for the future; especially important for at-risk students.

When GT students are challenged to produce authentic products, it has real-world implications; such as community activism. Society benefits from GT students who become well-rounded students, leaders, and those committed to work for lasting changes for good.

There needs to be a celebration of learning, encouragement to research and discover and persist when things become difficult. ~ Jo Freitag, Co-ordinator Gifted Resources, Australia

Environmental factors such as homogeneous grouping of GT students with others of like-ability and the availability of enrichment programs can foster a mindset of achievement. The presence of supportive parents and family or mentors who guide, support or share expertise can also foster an achievement mindset. Environmental factors can help GT students to navigate challenges and learn self-regulation.

Research has found that the introduction of curriculum that encourages creativity can enhance student success. University faculty should use open-ended assessments rather than written assignments and traditional testing. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Starting a High School Mentoring Program for the Gifted: Opportunities and Challenges (pdf)

Mentors’ Contributions to Gifted Adolescents’ Affective, Social, and Vocational Development (Roeper Review)

Effects of Service Learning on Young, Gifted Adolescents and Their Community

Gifted Secondary School Students: The Perceived Relationship Between Enrichment & Achievement Orientation (pdf)

Does Higher Education Foster Critical and Creative Learners? (pdf)

The Role of Creative Coursework in Skill Development for University Seniors (pdf)

Mathematically Gifted Accelerated Students Participating in an Ability Group: A Qualitative Interview Study

‘Honors’ Should Mean a Challenge, Not an Upgrade to First Class

An Investigation of Student Psychological Wellbeing: Honors Versus Nonhonors Undergraduate Education (Journal of Advanced Academics)

Programs and Services for Gifted Secondary Students: A Guide to Recommended Practices (Prufrock Press)

Status of High School Gifted Programs (pdf)

Expanding the Conception of Giftedness to Include Co-cognitive Traits and Promote Social Capital (Renzulli)

Research on Giftedness and Gifted Education: Status of the Field and Considerations for the Future

What the Research Says: Gifted Education Works (pdf)

Who Are The ‘Gifted And Talented’ And What Do They Need?

The Efficacy of Advanced Placement Programs for Gifted Students

Research That Supports Need for & Benefits of Gifted Education The National Association for Gifted Children (pdf)

Image courtesy of Unsplash

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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From Home Education to Higher Education

gtchat 09262017 HomeEd

Families with gifted children are one of the fastest growing segments of homeschooling today. The choice to homeschool is no longer limited to those who make the choice for religious reasons as was common in the past. Along with that choice comes the need to know and understand how to approach the college entrance process. Our guest this week, Lori Dunlap, recently wrote a book entitled From Home Home Education to Higher Education from GHF Press which addresses the many questions asked by homeschoolers.

gtchat From Home Ed to Higher Ed Front Cover

Faced with roadblocks and not having needs met at their children’s schools; parents of gifted learners often turn to homeschooling. Families realize that their school’s approach to education does not fit with their goals for their child’s education.

According to Corin Goodwin, Executive Director of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, “Homeschool families are so diverse that any generalization is going to include misconceptions.” With regard to college entrance, many people think that homeschoolers will encounter more issues in transitioning to college than their public school counterparts. This line of thinking extends to believing homeschoolers will lack the ability to deal with schedules and routines in college which simply is not the case. Corin added, “In fact, they often do better because they are self-motivated and have not had their curiosity suppressed.”

How are homeschoolers viewed by colleges and universities? Lori explained, “Colleges and universities not only accept homeschoolers; in many cases they’re actually seeking them out! In researching my book, the most FAQ that came up from admissions officers was, ‘Where can I find more homeschoolers?’ Other hurdles included misperceptions in college admissions community including “Mom grades” on transcripts and academic “rigor.”

Regarding the college application process, Lori told us, “For any student, finding schools that are a good fit for their goals and interests is the most important part of the process. In applications, admission officers want to see how homeschoolers have taken advantage of the flexibility and freedom that comes with educational choice.”

With regard to what college admission officers are looking for, Lori said, “The first thing they want to know is if the student is academically qualified and can be successful at the school. [They are also] looking for variety and diversity; an area where homeschoolers can stand out with unique educational experiences. They want to know your “story”. Think of your application as a story, with a beginning, middle, and end. Non-standard applications throw some of them for a loop. This is why SAT/ACT scores are still required for homeschoolers even at “test opt” schools.”

“Know your child. Help them set goals and steer their lives, but be ready to scaffold when needed.” ~ Corin Goodwin, Executive Director of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum

There are some ways parents can help prepare their child to transition to college life. It was pointed out by many at the chat that perhaps the hardest part, but most important  for parents, is letting go. Corin reminded us, “Parents can listen to their student instead of pushing hopes on kids. The kid has to live with their choices. They should make their own.” Lori added, “To prepare, we need to give our students increasing levels of independence and appropriate responsibility as they get older. By the time they go off to college, they should have skills and confidence to operate as independently as possible.” A transcript of this chat can be found at Storify.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

From Home Education to Higher Education 

About Lori Dunlap at Amazon

College Admissions for Homeschoolers: 3 Inevitable Questions

College Admissions for Homeschoolers: 3 More Inevitable Questions 

Forging Paths: Beyond Traditional Schooling

Self-Directed Learning: Documentation and Life Stories

Happiest Homeschooling Moments: A Reflection

From Home Education to Higher Education: A Review

Grateful for All of It, No Exceptions: Loving the Unexpected Gifts of Giftedness

Reflections in a Pond: Recognizing Giftedness in Our Children and Ourselves

Research: From Home Ed to Higher Ed

Earning Admission: Real Strategies for Getting into Highly Selective Colleges – Review

Teach Your Own

Homeschooled Student’s Transcript Might Be for a Cat

Sprite’s Site: Socialization

Sprite’s Site: Socialization 2

Sprite’s Site: Qualified to Teach

The Uncommon Application

Cybraryman’s Homeschooling Page

GHF: Teens (and College)

GHF: US Public Education Policy: Missing Voices

Graphic  courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

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