Category Archives: Design Thinking

Exploring Passion-Based Learning

 

Passion-Based Learning builds on students’ passion to assist in learning. It facilitates learning focusing on current passions and stimulating new interests. It begins at a position of strength motivating students to want to learn and take the initiative to solve problems important to them. It provides the opportunity to develop critical thinking skills, how to work and communicate with others, and seek creative solutions to problems.

Why is Passion-Based Learning a good option for GT students? Passion-Based Learning invokes intrinsic motivation. Through interested inquiry, GT students are lead to deeper learning, are better able to retain new learning, and develop stronger relationships with their teachers and peers. It enables students to think creatively, increases student engagement, and motivates students to take the lead in their own learning. Passion-Based Learning makes learning personal and relevant to students’ lives; prepares them for careers that involve their passions. It empowers GT students and encourages them to seek unique solutions to real world problems.

How can teachers get started with Passion-Based Learning in their classrooms? Passion-Based Learning builds on students’ previous experiences at the same time using materials and information that increases their knowledge and learning about the topic being studied. The very process of Passion-Based Learning enables students to not only consume content but to learn how to plan and design a project using research methods curated content. Teachers can facilitate it by allowing students time to connect emotionally with their passions and time to collaborate with like-minded peers via classroom interactions or online. Teachers can foster a learning environment which encourages creativity, imagination, curiosity, discovery, and risk-taking.

Technology in Passion-Based Learning can open doors to global collaboration with mentors as well as experts in the student’s field of study. It provides students the opportunity to conduct research and gain technical expertise in their final product design. Technology can also provide students with an authentic audience to review their products and solutions.

Parents can play a vital role in Passion-Based Learning outside of school by supporting classroom activities such as encouraging imaginative play, facilitating face-to-face collaboration with peers, and providing necessary resources. They can look for opportunities to inspire their children’s passions and then time to explore those passions.

Where can you find resources for Passion-Based Learning? Edutopia is a great resource for Passion-Based Learning. Resources for Passion-Based Learning can also be found by searching for Project-Based Learning, Genius Hour, Design Thinking. All the resources shared during chat can be found below.

A transcript of this chat may be found on our Wakelet page.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

How to Ignite Passion in Your Students: 8 Ways Educators Can Foster Passion-based Learning

The 4 Essential Elements of Passion-based Learning

Edutopia: Passion-Based Learning

Passion-Based Learning

Guidelines of Passion-Based Learning

A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change (book)

Passion-Based Learning A Practical Way for Educators to Empower Learners

Passion that Chooses Us

25 Ways To Promote Passion-Based Learning In Your Classroom

Passion-Based Projects in Education

How I Used Personal Passion Projects In My Classroom

Teaching Strategies to Help Students Find Their Passion

Teaching Strategies to Promote Passion, Empower Students

Passion-Driven Research Projects

Catch a Fire: Fuelling Inquiry and Passion Through Project-Based Learning (book)

The Power of Passion Projects For Kids

Passion-Driven Classroom, The: A Framework for Teaching and Learning (book)

10 Ways to Encourage Passion-based Learning

Sprite’s Site: Grey Sneakers

Sprite’s Site: Brown Brogues

Andi McNair: Genius Hour (website)

Cybraryman’s Self-Determined Learning Page

Cybraryman’s Passion-Based Learning Page

Thinking Like a Lawyer: A Framework for Teaching Critical Thinking to All Students (book)

Gifts for Learning (website)

Photo courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

High-Level Questioning to Deepen Learning

Higher level thinking questions are questions that can’t be answered simply by recalling information or reading the answer from the text. They demand that students display advanced cognitive skills and be able to think beyond what is being asked literally and expect that students will apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate information pertinent to the question. Students must think critically. Higher order questioning comes with the expectation that students go deeper and reflect on all possible answers.

Higher level thinking skills go beyond mere observation. Students cannot rely on rote memorization to answer questions. They involve forming concepts and making connections. Students demonstrate they get the ‘big picture’. Higher level thinking includes critical or analytical thinking, creative thinking, being able to generate own questions and ideas, and being able to solve problems.

Why should educators use high-level questioning with their GT students? High-level questioning results in high-level thinking which, when developed, produces students who not only understand what’s needed to solve problems, but are able to make decisions and take action. It can increase “the rigor and sophistication of a classroom learning experience.” (MacFarlane PHP 2018) GT students benefit from the increased intellectual rigor that comes from high-level questioning; are able to engage in deeper classroom discussions; and gain a deeper understanding of the content being covered.

Teachers creating higher-level questions need an “in-depth knowledge and understanding of the academic content, effective instructional use of questioning, and evaluation/assessment of student responses”. (MacFarlane PHP 2018) They can use Bloom’s Taxonomy to create higher-level questions. Questions should promote new and different perspectives which require students to defend their answers. Instructional techniques such as SCAMPER and Creative Problem Solving can be used to create higher-level questions. (MacFarlane PHP 2018)

Increasing the complexity of questions throughout the curriculum can be incorporated into daily instruction. Demonstrating how to create and answer questions with multiple answers is a way to foster student participation as well as motivating students to ask themselves questions while exploring the subject matter.

Why is it important to teach students how to ask questions as well as to respond to them? Student generated questions deepen their knowledge of the material being covered, stimulate cognitive processing, and add complexity. Encouraging student inquiry can lead to the exploration of social and emotional aspects contained in the topics being discussed. By having students form their own questions, they learn how to form high quality questions which lead to higher intellectual stimulation and more informative discussions.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

6 Scaffolds That Deepen Independent Learning

High Level Questioning and Cognition in Advanced Curriculum

Questioning Strategies for Teaching the Gifted (book) (aff. link)

Critical Thinking: Frameworks and Models for Teaching

Deeper Learning through Questioning (pdf)

Enhancing Peer Interaction and Learning in the Classroom Through Reciprocal Questioning (pdf)

From Sage on the Stage to Guide on the Side (pdf)

The Effects of Question-Generation Training on Metacognitive Knowledge, Self-Regulation and Learning Approaches in Science (pdf)

Principles of Instruction Research-Based Strategies That All Teachers Should Know (pdf)

Best Practice Strategies for Effective Use of Questions as a Teaching Tool

Higher-order Questions

Seven Strategies That Encourage Neural Branching

Higher-Order Questioning Inspires Higher-Level Thinking

Framework for Thinking Through Quality Questioning (pdf)

The Importance of Questioning in Developing Critical Thinking Skills (pdf)

Promoting Student Engagement Through a Critical Thinking Framework in the Elementary Classroom (pdf)

Skilful Questioning: The Bearing Heart of Good Pedagogy

Establishing a Culture of Questioning

InQuiring Minds: Reaching Deeper Learning Through Questions

Generating Effective Questions

5 Questions to Tackle in Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques

Teaching Tips for High-Level Questioning

Art and Science of Teaching/Asking Questions – At Four Different Levels

Depth of Knowledge Question Stems

Today’s Disruptors Can Be Tomorrow’s Innovators

Sprite’s Site: New Shoes

Rodriguez Resources GT (Google Drive)

Think Like a Lawyer (YouTube 3:59)

Cybraryman’s Questioning Techniques Page

Cybraryman’s Gifted and Talented Page

Disclaimer: Some resources include affiliate links.

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

Empowering Student Voice in Gifted Education

 

This week at Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT on Twitter, we chatted about what a choice-driven classroom looks like and why is it important. A truly choice-driven classroom goes far being a choice of menu options – it’s empowering students to control their learning. Full stop. It values a student’s ability to choose while at the same time providing appropriate supports and guidance. Not all students … even GT … will adapt to this new way of learning easily. A choice-driven classroom gives voice to topics explored, grouping, scaffolding, assessment and final product expectations; and, it embodies the ideal that education is preparation for a life well lived and a civil right for all students; including GT.

“A choice driven classroom has students that are engaged because they are empowered to learn about what they like, how they like, and/or their input is valued in how they demonstrate knowledge and mastery.” ~ Amy RogersAdvanced Academics Coordinator for Willis ISD, TX

Gifted students need to be provided tangible ways to express their voice and have those sentiments respected if they are to take ownership of their own learning. They must have a viable option for submitting feedback on a regular basis and have it validated through time response in the classroom. Teachers need to be ready to relinquish control to some extent … motivation for GT students requires independence and developing leadership qualities in students with authenticity being the driver.

How do you incorporate student choice in the classroom? The Choose2Matter movement and Angela Maiers have great suggestions for incorporating student choice: good old-fashioned brainstorming, surveying student interests, debating topics, and voting as final affirmation. Outside the classroom resources can lend direction and authentic responses to student choice via conferences organized and led by students and positive participation on social media platforms. Teachers modeling the ‘process of choice’ can reduce the possibility of risk-aversion by making sure students understand choice works and affects their entire lives.

This topic begs the question, should students choose everything? Students do not control the classroom – they are participants and are subject to the same constraints there that are present in life … civility, available time, prior learning. Adapting to a choice-driven approach to learning still requires educators to provide guidance to their students. The idea of potentially limiting choices in a choice-driven classroom is not the antithesis of such but the validation that it is a ‘process’ and not a ‘result’. Guard rails as guide-rails suddenly makes sense.

How do you assess the learning if students are choosing to do such different things? Assessments must reflect the reality of choice-driven classrooms … students must have responsible influence in how their work is assessed. Authentic assessment includes self-reflection, peer assessment, response to personal inquiry. Choice-driven learning embodies personalized learning and this should include a modest level of one-on-one periodical engagement between teachers and students; again in validation of process. John Spencer suggests that switching to standards-based grading honors a mastery mindset, allows for mistakes and renewal – a good match for choice-driven classrooms.

Far too often, students become accustomed to being told what to do and what is expected of them. Providing choice is a risky undertaking for all stakeholders – gifted students know this and can assess the risk/benefit outcomes. Adults in the room can respect student voice and choice at the same time supporting those choices – ownership of learning increases engagement, critical thinking and ultimately student success. A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

 

At the beginning of 2019, the team from Global #gtchat Powered by #TAGT welcomes you all to the New Year!

 

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

5 Tips for Getting Started with Student Choice

Ten Ways to Leverage Student Choice in Your Classroom

What happens when kids struggle with student choice?

Taking Choice Menus to the Next Level for Student Ownership

Student Voice: Inspiring & Empowering Students to Take Charge of their Education

Motivation, Engagement & Student Voice (pdf)

Activating Student Voice Empowers Learning (pdf)

Eight Ways to Encourage Student Voice

Deepening Student Voice and Empowerment

Guiding Students to Drive Their Curriculum

8 Ways to Empower Student Voice in your Classroom

Listening to Student Voice: Toward a More Holistic Approach to School Leadership

How Student Voice Can Inform Assessment for Learning in Schools

Cybraryman’s Student Voice Page

Cybraryman’s What Students Want Page

Extending Student Voice to Gifted Students

Student Voice: Listening to Gifted Learners

Student Voice Menus

What is an Innovation Class…and Why Do You Need One?

Image courtesy of Unsplash

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

Embracing Multipotentiality in Gifted Students

gtchat 10112018 Multipotential

The textbook definition of multipotentiality is: an educational/psychological term referring to the ability and preference, particularly of strong intellectual or artistic curiosity; to excel in 2 or more different fields. A multipotentialite does not need to be an expert in any one field and may like to study diverse subjects. They are often referred to as a Jack-of-all-trades or Renaissance person.

Being a multipotentialite means having the potential to pursue many different passions and   be successful at many or all of them. They have a wide variety of career choices and the ability change from one to another if they wish.

Is there a downside to multipotentiality? A multipotentialite often finds it difficult to choose a single career or when they do; stick with it. Often they are never challenged until college when studies become difficult. It can lead to high stress levels, overscheduling, confusion and depression.

One can embrace their own multipotentiality by seeking inspiration from peers and  from mentors who can help a multipotentialite focus on their passions. Investigation, researching ideas, and trying things out can all help a multipotentialite gain a career focus.

How can parents guide their child’s response to being a multipotentialite? They can expose children throughout their lives to opportunities to work with peers, mentors and professionals. Parents can tune into their child’s passions and look for ways to help them explore ideas and potential careers.

Multipotentialites should embrace the philosophy of ‘variety is the spice of life’; it is no longer necessary to remain in a single career throughout one’s life. It’s acceptable to hold multiple part-time positions that blend passions. They should remain adaptable and be ready to change course when opportunities arise. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 1 PM NZDT/11 AM AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Refuse to be Boxed In: Embrace Your Multipotentiality

From Identification to Ivy League: Nurturing Multiple Interests and Multi-Potentiality in Gifted Students

Career Counseling for Gifted Students: Literature Review & Critique (pdf)

Multipotentiality Among the Intellectually Gifted: “It Was Never There and Already It’s Vanishing” (pdf)

Gifted Adrift? Career Counseling of the Gifted and Talented

A World of Possibilities: Career Development for Gifted Students

If You Still Don’t Believe You’re Gifted

Multipotentiality: Are You Overwhelmed By Your Too Muchness?

Let’s Get Real about Gifted Kids

What is a Multi-Potential?

Identity, Purpose, and Happiness: Helping High-Achieving Adolescents Find All Three

Counseling Concerns of Gifted and Talented Adolescents: Implications for School Counselors

Multipotentiality: When High Ability Leads to Too Many Options

When I Grow Up: Multipotentiality and Gifted Youth

Good at Too Many Things?

Cybraryman’s Multipotentiality Page

Multipotentiality Resources

Multipotentiality: When High Ability Leads to Too Many Options

Multipotentiality – Do You Have Too Many Tabs Open?

Image courtesy of Flickr  CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

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