Search Results for literature

Gifted Role Models in Literature and Film

gtchat-10042016-gifted-role-models

Gifted kids derive many benefits from reading books and watching films with gifted characters. Positive gifted role models in books and movies show gifted kids they are not alone; that there are others like them. These role models can help kids to learn how to appropriately interact socially with age-peers and adults. How characters are portrayed is a powerful way of influencing the views of younger readers and film goers; and can positively impact their lives.

Today there are many places where one can find books and films with gifted characters for gifted students  and children. Websites and blogs have become rich resources for book lists for above-level readers.There are book publishers who specialize in books about and for gifted students and children.  Films with gifted characters can be chosen (subjectively) via movie data bases.

Current books recommended for gifted kids by our chat participants included Artemis Fowl, Harry Potter, Magic Tree House, Surviving the Applewhites, A Wrinkle in Time, Chronicles of Narnia, Archibald Frisby, and Tuck Everlasting.  Other included Divergence, Hunger Games, Maze Runner, The View From Saturday, The Mysterious Benedict Society, The UnWanteds, Half Magic, Franny K. Stein, Percy Jackson, The Giver, Ender’s Game, and Harriet the Spy.

Recent movies recommended by our chat participants for gifted kids included the Harry Potter series, Big Hero 6, The Imitation Game, How to Train Your Dragon, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Queen of Katwe, Little Man Tate, Searching for Bobby Fischer, October Sky, Apollo 13, August Rush, Kim Possible, and Inside Out. A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify. Please see the links below for more suggestions.

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at 13.00 NZST/11.00 AEST/1.00 UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Book Lists for Gifted Learners

Film Discussion Series at Gifted Resources

Gifted Kids, Gifted Characters and Great Books

Amadeus to Young Einstein: Modern Cinema & Its Portrayal of Gifted Learners (pdf )

Kubo and the Two Strings

6 Books Series About Gifted Children

Movies Featuring Gifted Kids (and Adults!)

Good Books for Verbally Talented Learners (pdf)

Fostering the Social & Emotional Development of Gifted Children through Guided Viewing Of Film

The Movie about NASA’s Black Female Scientists That’s Been A Long Time Coming

Publishers Specializing in the Gifted

Top Ten Books for Gifted Children

Recommended Books for Talented Readers (pdf)

Movies with Gifted Characters (pdf)

25 of Our Favorite Gifted Kids Movies

Guiding the Gifted Reader

Bibliotherapy with Gifted Students

Using Books to Heal & Enthuse Gifted Students

The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales

Some of My Best Friends Are Books: Guiding Gifted Readers (3rd Edition) (Amazon)

Supporting Gifted Children through Bibliotherapy

Books for Gifted Children with Gifted Characters & Themes

Cybraryman’s Teaching with Movies Page

Gifted Homeschoolers Blog Hop: Gifted in Reel Life

Hoagies’ Blog Hop: Gifted in Pop Culture

 

Image courtesy of Vimeo    CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

 

Myths about Gifted Kids

 

This week at #gtchat, we welcomed Kathleen Humble, GHF Press author of Gifted Myths: An Easy-to-Read Guide to Myths on the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional. Kathleen is a writer and homeschooling mum with ADHD in Australia to two wonderful twice-exceptional children. Previously, she was also a mathematician, computer programmer, and a children’s entertainer.

The first myth we discussed was – “All children are gifted” – How should we respond? The idea that ‘all children are gifted’ is tantamount to saying ‘everyone is the same’ and that is simply absurd. We wouldn’t say all children are athletic any more than all children are stupid. It’s wrong and consequential. As argued by Michael Clay Thompson, just substitute the word ‘gifted’ with any other descriptor; it becomes nonsensical. ‘All children are [fill in the blank] … No; no they are not. To say ‘all children are gifted’ is an effort to conflate educational and social meanings of the term ‘gifted’. Have a gift – such as being kind – is not the same as being gifted.

“High achievement = being gifted” – Does it? Motivation is a key aspect of achievement. Gifted children may be motivated, but others are not. Non-gifted students may respond to extrinsic motivation; whereas, gifted students may only be intrinsically motivated. High achievers can be identified as gifted and gifted students may not be high achievers. The terms are not synonymous. This poses a significant issue when providing services to those who need them. Underachievement – a discrepancy between ability and academic performance – is, in fact, a significant issue among gifted students which frustrates parents and is perplexing to educators.

“All children should have gifted education” – Should they? When critics of gifted education use this argument, how are they defining ‘gifted’ education? Most times, it is seen as providing ‘extras’ like field trips or extension opportunities not available to all students. This myth concludes that all children can ‘become’ gifted if they work hard enough or are exposed to higher level opportunities. Requiring students to attempt mastery of content they are unable to handle can have the opposite effect; increasing a feeling of failure and highlighting inabilities.

“Gifted education is elitist” – Why should schools be required to provide it? The charge of elitism in gifted education is usually an excuse used to deny services to GT students. It has no basis in reality. Stating that ‘gifted education is elitist’ is more often a response to a situation meant to evoke emotion; to elicit sympathy for all ‘other’ children. It sets up a false equivalence; an ‘us’ versus ‘them’ mindset. Advocates for gifted education seek educational accommodations based on need; not some sense of superiority. Gifted education should be provided to children with demonstrable need just as special education is provided to children based on their individual needs. Without it, these children become disadvantaged.

“Ability grouping hurts some students feelings” – Why is it necessary? “Grouping gifted children is one of the foundations of exemplary gifted education practice.” In educational terms, it is the ‘least restrictive environment’ for GT students (NAGC Position Statement). Ability grouping is essential to meeting the needs of gifted students. It is the basis for successful differentiation of the curriculum. To imply that other children will be academically or emotionally disadvantaged because of ability grouping is simply not supported by research.

“2E students don’t exist” – Who are they and why do they need accommodated? This is a myth that needs to be eliminated now – that a student recognized as gifted cannot also experience learning difficulties. They can and they do. For generations, education systems have failed to understand or identify twice-exceptional students because ability and disabilities often mask each other. Best practice dictates that ability should be accommodated before disability, but usually the opposite occurs. This severely limits these kids from even considering the fact that they have greater potential than is recognized.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

Yellow Readis (Kathleen’s website)

Gifted Myths: An Easy-to-Read Guide to Myths on the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional (book)

GHF Press (website)

Twice-Exceptional Kids are Education’s Canary in the Coal Mine (pdf)

Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Mathematical Giftedness: A Literature Review (2016)

Optimized Gamma Synchronization Enhances Functional Binding of Fronto-parietal Cortices in Mathematically Gifted Adolescents during Deductive Reasoning

The Effects of Disability Labels on Special Education and General Education Teachers’ Referrals for Gifted Programs (pdf)

Worth the Effort Finding and Supporting Twice Exceptional Learners in Schools (YouTube 1:06)

Giftedness Is Not an Unwrapped Present

Differences Between Academic High Achievers and Gifted Students

The Truth about ‘Gifted’ Versus High-Achieving Students

Being Gifted is Often NOT the Same as Being High-Achieving

A Response to “Everyone is Gifted in Some Way”

How the Gifted Brain Learns: Chapter 1 – What is a Gifted Brain? (pdf)

NAGC Position Paper: Grouping (pdf)

Michael Clay Thompson: Is Everyone Gifted?

The Concept of Grouping in Gifted Education (Fiedler, Lange, & Winebrenner, 2002) (pdf)

Grouping and Acceleration Practices in Gifted Education (Essential Readings in Gifted Education Series) (book)

Sprite’s Site: Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 2

Sprite’s Site: Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 3

Sprite’s Site: Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 8

Sprite’s Site: Columbus Cheetah, Myth Buster – Myth 9

Sprite’s Site: Gifted Under Achievers

Sprite’s Site: 2E is

Sprite’s Site: What makes them 2E?

Grouping the Gifted and Talented: Questions and Answers

Meet the Female Entrepreneur who became an Artist Overnight after a Brain Injury

Graphic images courtesy of Kathleen Humble and GHF Learners.

Graphic created by Lisa Conrad.

Instructional Strategies to Support Gifted ELLs

This week, we welcomed the TAGT Equity Resource Committee to #gtchat – Tish Cawley, Matthew Fugate, and Javetta Roberson – to chat about instructional strategies to support gifted English Language Learners (ELLs).

Gifted ELLs have similar characteristics to other gifted students, but may exhibit them differently. Characteristics of gifted ELLs may be observed in the context of acquisition of a new language – the rate at which proficiency occurs, switching between languages, and accuracy of translation. Academic characteristics to look for in gifted ELL students include advanced reading, creativity, and problem solving abilities as well as above grade level math skills. Behavioral characteristics to look for in gifted ELL students include respect for their culture, social maturity, and an ability to display appropriate behaviors in both cultures.

What are some barriers to identifying English Learners & how can we overcome them? An initial barrier to identification of gifted ELLs is the observer’s inability to communicate with the student in their native language. Educator bias – consideration for gifted programs based on conventional markers and academic achievement only – can be countered by using an inclusive framework that goes beyond standardized tests & anti-bias training.

Once you identify English Learners, what does a culturally responsive GT curriculum look like? A culturally responsive GT curriculum addresses the need for a student’s culture to be recognized and valued. Multicultural literature and classroom discussions about a student’s culture are an effective way of responding to the needs of gifted ELL students. Maintaining a culturally responsive classroom after students are identified is an important role of teachers in supporting gifted ELLs.

How will a Talent Development model benefit English Learners? It will take into consideration a student’s interests and build on individual strengths. Talent Development models have used in Europe and have been very successful in meeting the needs of many diverse cultures.

Gifted ELLs should be supported through the use of linguistic accommodations and scaffolding in both English and their native language. They need to be provided opportunities to speak and interact with other students both in structured and informal conversation.

What are some resources for parents to help support English Learners at home? School can provide learning opportunities for parents on how to support their child at home to learn how to advocate for their child and how to form support groups. Parents should regularly be updated about resources, programs, and academic opportunities available to students related to their child’s interests and abilities.

A transcript of this chat can be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Resources:

How Do We Identify Gifted English Learners?

Recognizing the Gift: Identifying Gifted English Learners

FL: Assessing Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students for Eligibility for Gifted Programs (pdf)

Baltimore Students Learning English Say They Still Don’t Have a Fair Shot at the City’s Top Schools

Identifying Gifted and Talented English Language Learners: A Case Study (pdf) (Plucker, Rapp, Martinez)

Identifying and Serving Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Gifted Students

Teaching Culturally Diverse Gifted Students

Working With Gifted English Language Learners

Special Populations in Gifted Education: Understanding Our Most Able Students From Diverse Backgrounds

Effective Curriculum for Underserved Gifted Students

Identifying and Serving Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Gifted Students (pdf)

Identifying Gifted Children from Diverse Populations

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Gifted Students: Do They Fall through the Cracks (PPT)

Curriculum Approaches that Overcome Learning Gaps and Language Barriers for Diverse Gifted Students

Edutopia: Identifying and Supporting Gifted ELLs

Identifying Gifted and Talented English Language Learners Grades K-12 (pdf)

Gifted, But Still Learning English, Many Bright Students Get Overlooked

Identifying and Assessing Gifted and Talented Bilingual Hispanic Students

Start Seeing and Serving Underserved Gifted Students 50 Strategies for Equity and Excellence

Disclaimer: Some resources contain affiliate links.

Image courtesy of Pixabay Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Building a Successful Gifted Program

Gifted programs should ensure a continuum of services throughout a GT student’s entire K-12 school career. They should include opportunities for all forms of acceleration, differentiation in the regular classroom, and alternative learning environments. All gifted programs need a social-emotional component to fully meet the needs of gifted students.

Best practices in gifted identification require a multifaceted approach. Reliance on only one measurement, such as IQ tests, will result in many students being missed. Out-of-level testing are essential to avoid inaccurate measurements. Because the best programs are tailored to student needs and not vice versa; universal testing as well as parent and teacher recommendations, should be utilized. Gifted identification should be culturally sensitive, linguistically appropriate, and take into account low-SES environmental factors such as lack of access to technology.

The best gifted programs provide challenge to all GT students include PG, twice-exceptional, and ELL. Curriculum should promote authentic experiential learning experiences and be conducive to exploration of student interests. A gifted curriculum should be more complex, provide in-depth study of key-concepts; and stress higher-level thinking, creativity, and problem solving. It can include enrichment and compacting as needed. Services may include standalone gifted classrooms; full-grade or subject acceleration; full or part day pull-out; independent study; early entrance/early out; dual enrollment in college classes; and counseling services.

Parents should be included in district planning and evaluation of gifted programs. Programs serve students and parents are often good judges of their child’s need. Their involvement can be a conduit for advocacy of gifted programs. As programs develop, parents need to be informed of identification criteria and procedures; and have access to application forms. Utilizing classroom tech, social media, and newsletters are all ways to stay connected. Forming a Parent Support or Advocacy group is a great way to build support for a school’s gifted programs. Parents can be invited to special information sessions at Parent Night events or engaged at regular monthly meetings.

Professional development is essential in a high quality gifted program. Few teachers receive any coursework in gifted education during their undergraduate years. PD should be often and on-going to be effective. Gifted endorsement is highly recommended. Most endorsements are attainable online. Many states require teachers of gifted students to receive continuing education credits in gifted education.

What criteria should be used for evaluating effectiveness of program options & design? Criteria for student products should high-level and exemplary. Student products should be comparable to those of professionals in the field, challenge existing ideas, and produce new ones. Criteria for evaluating a program’s success and effectiveness should rely on standardized, achievement, and performance-based assessments as well as program feedback from all stakeholders – students, teachers and parents. All students, including GT students, should demonstrate academic growth with special care identify areas of strength and weakness in order to modify existing programs to better meet students’ needs.

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZDT/Noon AEDT/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Resources:

Gifted Program Development

Building an Exemplary Gifted Program

Elements of a Good School Gifted Program

South Carolina – Gifted and Talented Best Practices Guidelines: Identification (pdf)

Gifted Education in America is Finally Moving Past its Legacy of Inequality

Why School Districts Are Rethinking Gifted & Talented Programs

Why Grouping Kids Based on Ability Works

Duke TIP Study Finds Using Local Criteria Identifies More Students as ‘Gifted’

Featured California Schools for Gifted Learners

Top Four Things to Look for in Your Gifted Program

The Best Kind of Schools for Gifted Kids

TAGT: Program Evaluation

Program Evaluation in Gifted Education (Book)

Gifted Education Strategies

Developing Exemplary Gifted Developing Exemplary Gifted Programs: Programs: What does the research say? What does the research say? (pdf)

High-Potential Students Thrive when School Districts Develop Sustainable Gifted Services

Texas State Plan for the Education of Gifted/Talented Students 2019 Final (pdf)

UK: What Works in Gifted Education? A Literature Review (pdf)

Is Gifted Education a Bright Idea? Assessing the Impact of Gifted and Talented Programs on Achievement and Behavior (pdf)

What Works in Gifted Education: Documenting the Effects of an Integrated Curricular/Instructional Model for Gifted Students

Gifted Education in China

State of the Nation in Gifted Education 2012 – 2013 (pdf)

Photo courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

%d bloggers like this: