Search Results for age appropriate

Locating Age-Appropriate Books for High Ability Learners

M3352M-1009Young Reader*

Locating age-appropriate books for high ability learners can prove difficult  for several reasons. Asynchronous development may mean that a very young child could comprehend reading material well beyond what may be considered appropriate for their age. As Lisa Van Gemert of American Mensa pointed out, interest levels and sensitivities also play important roles when finding appropriate yet challenging books for these children. Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources commented that material deemed appropriate for a child’s chronological age might be considered too simplistic and unsatisfying to the child. Leslie Graves, President of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, noted that the depth of thought embedded in the content and the pace of information offered would also make many leveled offerings inappropriate as well.

Young reader black and whiteChild Reading**

Reading patterns found in gifted readers can be different than those of typical readers. These kids often start reading earlier than their age peers and demonstrate deeper comprehension of what they read. Kate B.  stated they may be self taught, read faster and be voracious readers.  Justin Schwamm, Latin teacher at Tres Columnae, related that many gifted learners read and enjoy multiple books at once; which can drive others crazy. Moderator, Lisa Conrad, added that it’s still important to respect the developmental process and allow a child to enjoy reading at various levels. Parents should resist the urge to ‘push’ a child to read simply because they excel in other academic areas.

Parent readingParent Reading to Child*

Reading to children was still considered an important role of both the parent and teacher even after children were reading well on their own. Jerry Blumengarten, well known content curator Cybraryman and former teacher, remembered family reading time as enjoyable and an important time to be set aside even after children were reading. When he taught Language Arts, his 9th grade students loved when he read dramatically to them. Jayne Frances reminded us that reading aloud is important for pronunciation of words and sharing more precise or alternate definitions than those gleaned from context. Many also related the importance of emotional bonding that occurs when adults read to children whether it was a parent or teacher.

The popular school reading program ‘Accelerated Reader’ did not fare well in the opinions of many at this chat. This program seemed out-of-sync with high ability learners. Justin Schwamm told us that he was not a fan because extrinsic rewards for an intrinsically-valuable task are problematic at best.

Questions for this chat are here  and a full transcript of this chat can be found at Storify. Links from the chat and additional links are below.  Thank you to all chat participants who shared links with us.

gtchat thumbnail logoGlobal #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Fridays at 7/6 C & 4 PT in the U.S., midnight in the UK and Saturdays 1 PM NZ/11 AM AEDT to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Storify. Our Facebook Pageprovides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community.

Head Shot 2014-07-14About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered byTAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime advocate for gifted children and also blogs at Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Links:

Search Book Titles by Conceptual/Vocabulary Difficulty Age from Armadillo Soft

67 Books Every Geek Should Read to Their Kids Before Age 10

Some of My Best Friends Are Books: Guiding Gifted Readers (Amazon)

Guiding the Gifted Reader (1990)

Reading Lists for Your Gifted Child from Hoagies Gifted

Best-Loved Books: A Unique Reading List for Gifted Students Grades 6-12 (pdf)

Book List for Very Young Precocious Readers (link on bottom right of page)

Book List for Pre-teen Gifted Readers from Suki Wessling

The Challenge of “Challenged Books” Gifted Child Today Magazine Spring, 2002

GT-World Reading Lists

Books for Young Readers from the MN Council for the Gifted & Talented

Appropriate Content for Gifted Readers from Duke TIP

13 Age-Appropriate Books for Young Gifted Readers

Gifted 101: Choosing Books for Your Young Gifted Reader

3 Reasons I Loathe Accelerated Reader from Lisa Van Gemert, The Gifted Guru

Dear Google, You Should Have Talked to Me First from Jen Marten

Reading Lists from Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources

Appropriate Expectations for the Gifted Child from SENG

Slow Down and Look at the Pictures

Early Literacy Page from Cybraryman

Mensa Foundation Excellence in Reading

What Should I Read Next 

Reading List for Key Stage 1 Gifted Readers (pdf) from Potential Plus UK

Reading and Literacy Skills Page from Cybraryman

Books Page from Cybraryman

Newbery Medal Winners 1922 – Present 

Caldecott Medal and Honor Books 1938 – Present

Mrs. Ripp Reads

Additional Links:

Orientation (The School for Gifted Potentials Book 1) by Allis Wade

Revelations (The School for Gifted Potentials Book 2) by Allis Wade

Gifted Readers and Young Adult Literature: A Perfect Match from Duke TIP

Book Lists from Davidson Institute for Talent Development

The Gifted Reader’s Bill of Rights (pdf) by Bertie Kingore

Mind the Gap: Engaging Gifted Readers 

Resources for the Middle School Gifted Reader 

Books for Gifted Readers (Middle School)

Reading Projects for Gifted and Talented Students

Just Because They Can Doesn’t Mean They Should: Choosing Age-Appropriate Books for Literature Circles

*Photos: Courtesy of morgueFile

** Photo: Courtesy of Pixabay

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Appropriate Reading Instruction for Gifted Students

Gifted readers are those kids who read much earlier than expected and quickly progress to advanced reading levels. They enjoy reading, make good book selections, and display enthusiasm about reading. (S. Reis) Gifted readers read independently, read often, and are identified as having advanced language skills. (S. Reis)

Gifted readers possess unique reading needs. It is important to note first what they don’t need: drills on basic word and comprehension skills. Gifted readers need challenging material to remain engaged in the reading curriculum; easily turned off by too easy reading programs. They need level of difficulty to ‘match’ their ability based on their interests.

Learning experiences for gifted learners should encompass experiences that are meaningful and relevant to the student. (T. Johnson) All teachers involved in advanced reading programs should be well informed on best practices in gifted education and give serious consideration to all stakeholders’ concerns regarding the program including students. Student demographics including cultural diversity and generational characteristics must be incorporated into curriculum decisions.

Factors that should be considered in designing reading instruction for gifted learners are grounded in gifted programming standards. Gifted readers will not benefit from simple differentiation of existing reading programs. A wide spectrum of abilities exists in any regular education classroom. They will need a unique approach appropriate to their individual strengths. Reading programs may benefit from being included with cross-curriculum gifted options that are meant to increase depth and complexity, heighten anticipation and stimulate interest. (Reis/Renzulli)

What instructional strategies can be used to develop and enhance advanced reading skills?  Reading books or readers commonly used in the classroom should be supplemented with literature or completely eliminated for advanced readers. Discussion groups can be formed that take a closer look – a deeper dive – into books and novels being used as part of the reading curriculum employing discussion guides and Socratic questioning. Teachers can introduce the study of literature at an early age (provided they how a strong background in literature) by teaching elements of literature and discussing how to analyze what is read.

When setting goals for an advanced reading program, every single student should be expected to become a skilled, passionate, habitual and critical reader. (B. Seney) When considering reading comprehension as a goal of an advanced reading program, the only delivery system to attain the best results is actually reading. Reading motivation should be an integral part of any advanced reading program and can include providing an extensive class library, in-class reading time, respecting student choice of reading materials, and suggested literature. A transcript may be found at Wakelet.

On a personal note … this week, marked the 9th year for #gtchat on Twitter!

 

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at 2PM NZST/Noon AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

Reading and the Gifted: Developing a Program of Reading With a Global Perspective

Reading Instruction with Gifted and Talented Readers: A Series of Unfortunate Events or a Sequence of Auspicious Results? (pdf)

Reading Instruction for Talented Readers: Case Studies Documenting Few Opportunities for Continuous Progress (pdf)

Research-Based Practices for Talented Readers (pdf)

The Neglected Readers: Differentiating Instruction for Academically Gifted and Talented Learners (pdf)

Literacy Strategies for Gifted Learners (pdf)

Engaging Gifted Boys in New Literacies (pdf)

Gifted Readers: What do we know and what should we be doing (pdf)

Literacy Strategies to Challenge Advanced Readers (pdf)

Fostering Critical Thinking Skills: Strategies for Use with Intermediate Gifted Readers (pdf)

Meeting the Educational Needs of Young Gifted Readers in the Regular Classroom (pdf)

The Gifted, Reading, and the Importance of a Differentiated Reading Program (pdf)

Language Arts Needs of Gifted Learners

Guiding the Gifted Reader

You Get to Choose! Motivating Students to Read through Differentiated Instruction (pdf)

A Pentagonal Pyramid Model for Differentiation in Literacy Instruction across the Disciplines

Selecting Instructional Strategies for Gifted Learners

Individual Instruction Plan Menu for the Gifted Child (pdf)

 

Image courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

Culturally Responsive and Relevant Curriculum

Culturally relevant curriculum respects individual student culture and attempts to increase awareness in relating that culture to course content. Teachers using culturally relevant teaching display competence at teaching in a multicultural classroom. This pedagogy is thought to improve academic achievement for all students. Historically, “culturally relevant pedagogy urges collective action grounded in cultural understanding. (Ladson-Billings 1992)”

Why is culturally responsive teaching important in gifted education? It is linked to a wide range of positive outcomes including improved attendance, academic persistence, and much more interest in school in general. In gifted education, it addresses ‘stereotype threat’ – a fear that one is conforming to a stereotype (their culture) – which in turn can lead to lower academic achievement. Motivation is another concern for GT students which can be mitigated in part by providing a curriculum that is perceived as culturally relevant, useful and of interest. Many of the principles of culturally relevant pedagogy directly affect GT students including identity development, equity and excellence, and managing student emotions.

What is the goal of a culturally responsive curriculum? A culturally responsive curriculum replaces deficit-oriented teaching – seeing language, culture or identity as a barrier to learning – with asset-based approaches. The goal for culturally sensitive teachers is to respond to the needs of diverse populations in their classroom with student-oriented instruction. A culturally responsive curriculum might involve choosing non-English translations of material used in the classroom or adaptive technology for twice-exceptional students.

There are many ways to incorporate culturally responsive teaching strategies; first, be invested in learning about your students and their culture through open and honest communication with them. To be truly culturally responsive, teachers need to be immersed in the culture of their students – visit where they live, learn their language (lingo), and remove negative stereotypes from the classroom culture. Teaching strategies considered culturally responsive could include bringing guest speakers into the classroom who are representative of the culture, use real-world problem solving techniques, and use technology effectively.

How can a culturally responsive and relevant curriculum improve classroom management? A culturally responsive classroom acts as a safe haven for students who learn in a far less judgmental atmosphere. This can have a profound effect on classroom management where students want to display appropriate behavior. A culturally responsive classroom is inherently a more interesting place to learn. It empowers students to own their learning and the desire to improve their behavior as opposed to a setting where they feel a disconnect to the curriculum.

Culturally responsive curriculum will remain relevant; especially as gifted education becomes more culturally responsive itself regarding the identification process. Students exposed to a culturally responsive curriculum will be better prepared to thrive in an increasing diverse world and global economy. A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

Resources:

Introducing the Culturally Responsive Curriculum Scorecard: A Tool to Evaluate Curriculum

Striving for a Culturally Responsive Curriculum

Culturally Responsive Teaching A 50-State Survey of Teaching Standards (pdf)

Three Research-based Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies

Turn the Page: Looking Beyond the Textbook for Culturally-Responsive Curriculum

What have districts learned when embracing culturally responsive curricula?

5 Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies

Keeping Students at the Center with Culturally Relevant Performance Assessments

Critical Thinking Skills and Academic Achievement (pdf)

Engaging Curriculum

From Discipline to Culturally Responsive Engagement: 45 Classroom Management Strategies (book)

Teaching to Encourage Motivation (pdf)

Culturally Responsive Classroom Management & Motivation Handbook – Chapter 8: Qualities of Culturally Sensitive Teachers

The Center for Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning (website)

Being Culturally Responsive

Culturally Responsive Teaching – Excerpts from The Knowledge Loom: Educators Sharing and Learning Together (pdf)

Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies

The Two-by-Ten Classroom Management Method

Why a Culturally Responsive Curriculum Works

Culturally Responsive Teaching: Theory, Research, and Practice (Multicultural Education Series) 2nd Edition (book 2000)

Graphic courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad

Role of Assessment and Curriculum Design

The first consideration in assessment is best practices in the identification of GT students. It’s important to use multiple criteria when assessing and identifying GT students. Various assessments should be used at varied times. Consideration should be given to multiple talent areas. When identifying students for a GT program, measures that are relevant to available programs should be considered. Equitable processes for selection, validation and placement are important in the identification process. Consideration of instruments (tests) and other approaches should be sensitive to the inclusion of minority, ELL, low-SES and disabled students. Out-of-level assessments may need to be used and different procedures should be considered for secondary students.

There are many considerations that must be taken into consideration when designing curriculum for identified GT students. Does the curriculum provide sufficient depth, complexity, and pacing? GT students should be provided opportunities for metacognition and reflection. Will they be taught content, process, and concepts? Three characteristics of GT students critical for curriculum design include complexity, precocity and intensity. (VanTassel-Baska 2011) Motivation, persistence, interests, and access to resources and support are also important. GT students are capable of providing high-quality feedback regarding the curriculum. Will they be given sufficient voice to provide such feedback?

Appropriate learning assessments for gifted students include performance-based assessments and off-level achievement tests. Portfolios and informal assessments such as one-on-one discussion or peer-group discussions and observations are also appropriate for GT students.

The NAGC has produced national standards which list expected student outcomes. Standard 3 deals specifically with curriculum planning and instruction. We have provided links to these resources. Student outcomes include students demonstrating growth commensurate with aptitude; developing talents in talent or interest areas; and becoming independent investigators. In addition, student outcomes include developing knowledge and skills to live in a multicultural, diverse and global society; and receive benefits from gifted education that provides high quality resources and materials.

GT curriculum should provide “a means to serve not only the internal characteristics of gifted students, but also develop talent traits that are instrumental for advanced achievement. These talent traits include intellectual engagement, openness to experience, perseverance and passion for attaining long-term goals, a need for Ascending Intellectual Demand & intense focus in areas of personal and professional interests.” (Housand, A)

A transcript of this chat may be found at Wakelet.

Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Thursdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Fridays at Noon NZST/10 AM AEST/1 AM UK  to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found at Wakelet. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news and information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

 Lisa Conrad About the authorLisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Resources:

ASCD: Six Strategies for Challenging Gifted Learners

Standard 3: Curriculum Planning and Instruction

APA: What is Assessment?

SC – Gifted and Talented Best Practices Guidelines: Assessment (pdf 2018)

Developing Exemplary Gifted Developing Exemplary Gifted Programs: Programs: What does the research say? What does the research say? (pdf Stambaugh)

Alternative Assessments With Gifted and Talented Students (aff. link)

Introduction to Curriculum Design in Gifted Education (aff. link)

Assessment of Gifted and High-Ability Learners: Documenting Student Achievement in Gifted Education (aff. link)

Curriculum Planning and Instructional Design for Gifted Learners (3rd ed.) (aff. link)

Methods and Materials for Teaching the Gifted (4th ed.) (aff. link)

HK: Implementation of School-based Gifted Development Programmes

High Quality Curriculum for Gifted Learners

Texas State Plan for the Education of Gifted/Talented Students (pdf)

Gifted Learners as Global Citizens: Global Education as a Framework for Gifted Education Curriculum (pdf)

UK: What works in gifted education? (pdf)

Eight Universal Truths of Identifying Students for Advanced Academic Interventions (pdf)

Texas Performance Standards Project

Graphic courtesy of Pixabay  Pixabay License

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad.

 

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