Enrichment for Gifted Students

gtchat 03012016 Enrichment

 

While enrichment alone is not gifted education, gifted students can benefit from it; both in and out of school. Enrichment can strengthen current skills and interests as well as allow students to explore new subject areas. They benefit from the camaraderie experienced when learning with like-minded peers.  When being with others with similar talents and interests, long lasting friendships often develop. Jo Freitag of Gifted Resources explained, “Enrichment can give students experiences and learning that is different -deeper, broader, higher level than the regular curriculum.” Lisa Pagano, Gifted Education Specialist in North Carolina, added, “Enrichment can provide higher level opportunities for students to interact with content.”

“Enrichment” allows time for self-soothing in sensory friendly spaces, mentors and social-emotional development.” ~ Bob Yamtich

Extenuating circumstances may make it difficult for all schools to provide adequate resources for enrichment. Even if enrichment is provided by the school, parents may still want to provide additional enrichment for their children.

Teachers can help parents and families determine the best enrichment opportunities for students. They can suggest specialized topics not typically covered in the regular classroom. Many teachers have a list of programs and academic competitions available in the local area. Students can learn skills such as playing chess in school; then compete in tournaments outside of school.  Some schools use academic competition practice as enrichment activities in school; then take students to competitions.

What constitutes outstanding enrichment for gifted students? Enrichment for academically talented students should be challenging and include research-driven courses. It should expose students to new areas of interest which open their minds and developed a new found love for learning. Enrichment in a relaxed and supportive environment that values creativity and intelligence constitutes outstanding enrichment. Clinical Psychologist Gail Post of Gifted Challenges described outstanding enrichment as, ” What expands and nurtures their passions and strengths; enhances creativity; involves higher level thinking.” Hope Scallan, Enrichment Coordinator at Round Rock ISD in Texas, told us, “Outstanding enrichment has some amount of voice and choice, but also creates a positive environment with highly self-motivated students.” A transcript of this chat may be found at Storify.

 

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Global #gtchat Powered by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented  is a weekly chat on Twitter. Join us Tuesdays at 8E/7C/6M/5P in the U.S. and Wednesdays at  2 PM (14.00) NZDT/Noon (12.00) AEDT/1 AM (1.00) UK. to discuss current topics in the gifted community and meet experts in the field. Transcripts of our weekly chats can be found atStorify. Our Facebook Page provides information on the chat and news & information regarding the gifted community. Also, checkout our Pinterest Page and Playlist on YouTube.

Head Shot 2014-07-14  About the author: Lisa Conrad is the Moderator of Global #gtchat Powered        by TAGT and Social Media Manager of the Global #gtchat Community. She is a longtime  advocate for gifted children and also blogs at  Gifted Parenting Support. Lisa can be contacted at: gtchatmod@gmail.com

 

Links:

Curriculum Enrichment Resources 

Online Math: Options for Advanced Learners

Enrichment Opportunities for Gifted Students in North Carolina (pdf)

Puerto Rico: After-school Enrichment Program for Gifted & Talented Students

Great Books Summer Program

The Tres Columnae Project

Exploring Tomorrow Institute of Meaningful Instruction

Play With Purpose

Disclaimer: Links provided during this chat or in this blog post do not imply an endorsement of any particular program.

Graphic courtesy of Lisa Conrad. Image courtesy of Pixabay  CC0 Public Domain 

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Posted on March 7, 2016, in Education, enrichment, gifted and talented, gifted education, Multipotentiality, parenting and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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