Can Gifted Learners Really Be Challenged in the Regular Classroom?

This year’s Back-to-School #gtchat discussed whether or not gifted learners could really be challenged in the regular classroom. Many different opinions were expressed including the belief by many that it was possible, but rarely occurred.  A full transcript may be found here.

Most participants agreed that gifted learners do in fact learn differently; although several teachers pointed out that all children learn differently. This conclusion laid the basis for discussing various instructional strategies; their appropriateness and viability in the classroom over time.

Differentiation seemed to be the most widely used strategy for working with gifted students. A timely blog post by Ginger Lewman, “A Case Against Differentiated Instruction“, posed an alternate view.

Everyone in the chat seemed to agree that two factors … professional development in gifted education for teachers and teachers’ attitude toward gifted students … played a critical role in the delivery of services.

Links:

Instructional Strategies for Gifted Students 

High-Achieving Students in the Era of NCLB

Differentiation for Gifted Learners (Fall 2013) from Richard Cash 

Tips for Teachers: Successful Strategies for Teaching Gifted Learners from Davidson Gifted

Instructional Strategies for Gifted Education from the #gtchat Blog

What All Teachers in Regular Classrooms Can do for the Gifted

High Ability and Gifted Students in the Regular Program: Left Behind?

The Plight of the Gifted from Georgia Tech

The Miseducation of Our Gifted Children from Davidson Gifted

Gifted Kids and Elementary School from the Berkeley Parents Network

CCLebrate Learning 2013 – 2014 Parent Handbook (pdf)

Motivating Without Grades from IEA Gifted

Promoting a Positive Achievement Attitude w/Gifted & Talented Students from Davidson Gifted

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Posted on August 20, 2013, in Differentiation, Education, gifted education and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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