Asynchronous Transitioning to Adulthood

This chat marked our return to two weekly chats on Twitter at Noon and 7PM EDT. The discussion centered around the topic of how to help gifted teens transition to adulthood especially when they are dealing with asynchronous development. Participants shared their personal stories of what it was like to make this transition when they were that age. The transcript for this chat may be found on this blog.

Several suggestions were made to help ease the transition in high school by using flexible ability grouping to allow students to interact with intellectual peers. Dual-enrollment when available is a good way for teens to experience the rigor of college courses before attending full time. Students who decide to go to a university at a younger age can find it easier to attend a school close to home to avoid residential issues. Mentoring by older students with similar experiences is another good option. Dating/sexuality issues need to be discussed in an open and frank manner.

Links:

Gifted Ex-Child

Intelligence Does Not Equal Maturity from @TxGifted

“‘Play Partner’ or ‘Sure Shelter’: What Gifted Children Look for in Friendship” from @SENG_Gifted

Exceptionally Gifted Children: Different Minds

Genetic Studies of Genius (Terman)

Creative But Insecure

Why Capable People Suffer from the Impostor Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It (book)

 An Introduction to Combined Classes

EQ Versus IQ

Transition from Gifted Child to Adult Producer

Psychological Factors in the Development of Adulthood Giftedness from Childhood Talent

The Transition from Childhood Giftedness to Adult Creative Productiveness: Psychological Characteristics and Social Supports

The Adolescent Gifted Child

When Gifted Children Grow Up

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Posted on June 11, 2013, in Asynchronous Development, Gifted Adults, Social Emotional and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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